EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Our Police
Remembering Our Heroes

 MOTTO OF THE DEPARTMENT

 "EVER ON THE WATCH"

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CITATION OF VALOR
Sworn members who have sustained gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or serious injury under aggravated and hostile circumstances which could result in death or permanent disability while acting in their official capacity are eligible for this award.  Authority for the issuance of the Citation of Valor lies solely with the Police Commissioner.

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Retroactive Citation of Valor Program

Several years back, (about 8 at the time of this writing 2014), while watching the Military Channel with Patty (for those that don't know Patty is my wife), a show came on about the Purple Heart and the number of injured that never received their awards. The show went on to explain a program that was set up to award these men and women their awards, "Retroactively"; it explained that there is a certain amount of closure involved when a solider is injured during combat, and get’s a Purple Heart, that those that are skipped over for the awards miss. When taken out of combat due to an injury and sent home, it gives a sense of never having completed the mission and as such there is never closure for these men and women. So for years they walked around feeling as if they never completed the job. Many blaming themselves for their brothers either being killed, or injured in their absence; bringing on a bit of survivors guilt, mixed with a lack of closure that could have been avoided with an award acknowledging their injuries, service, and sacrifice. It was said to have caused issues that lead to alcoholism, homelessness, and other mental health issues in these soldiers. A program has since been started to retroactively issue awards to those that could prove they were injured during combat. The military went a step further, something Patty was not interested in, and talked over with me and several others extensively; but in the military program with proper documentation the award would be evaluated, and if approved, it would be "FREE" for the injured soldier. If it was not approved (lack of documentation), or provided postmortem to a family member, the award could be purchased for $75 dollars. Patty and other agree, if it is available for purchase, it takes the meaning of the ribbon down to nothing for those that have earned it, others would always wonder if the recipient earned it, or bought it. So in Patty’s program, it is only obtained for those injured LOD that have documentation.

Documentation, i.e. police reports, hospital reports, newspaper reports, and if that can not be found, a letter from someone that witnessed the incident. Using some of our resources we can often find what we need to help prove your case. So give any one or all of the above documentation and we'll file for this award. 

It took her 8 years, but her program up and running, so if our police were injured in the line of duty, and have injuries that have left them with permanent injuries, injuries that have them disabled they can write Patty or me through this website and we will work to get them their Citation of Valor.

Since starting the program Patty has been able to get three officers these awarded. The program is now in 100% perfect working order with all the kinks ironed out. So if you were injured LOD and forced to retired due to these injuries consider letting her file for these awards for you. The more of these we file, the better the chances of having the department starting to evaluate officer’s injuries before they retire so they can be given this award at the time of their retirement. On top of this other agencies are interested in this type program for their officers, so by filing we are actually helping other officers.
So again if you retired LOD and due to injuries that came about due to a struggle or other contact us, let us nominate you for this award. I know it isn't easy filing or having someone file for you, but in this case, it is not just for you, it will help others. Because not only will it show others that your sacrifice was acknowledged, but it will go onto to help future officers in being recognized for their injuries, and help other agencies to recognize their injured, and disabled police. We could use your help in giving us officers to file for so if you were injured or know of someone that was, please contact Patty or me through this site.

Those that were injured and received the award are as Follows: 1. Ret. Det. Kenneth Driscoll - 5 April 2013 for injuries aquired on 10 Aug 2001
2. Ret. Officer Gary Lapchak - 3 Feb 2014 for injuries aquired on 28 Oct 1997
3. Ret Officer Daryl Buhrman - 3 Feb 2014 for injuries aquired on 8 Feb 1981
4. Ret Sergeant Bob Bigos - 18 June 2014 for injuries aquired 9 September 1995
5. Ret. Officer Robert Cirello - 18 June 2014 for injuries aquired on 7 September 2006
6. Ret. Officer Kenneth Driscoll - 18 June 2014 for injuries aquired on 25 June 1992
7. Ret Det. Lennell Robinson - 18 June 2014 for injuries aquired on 17 April 1997
 

Tomlin Mark
Courtesy Mark Tomlin

A City Policeman stood before our God, for which we all must come to pass.
He hoped his shoes were shining just as bright as all his brass.

"Step forward Officer and tell me now, how should I proceed with you?
Have you always turned the other cheek... and to my church have you been true?"

The Officer cleared his throat then said, "I'm Sorry Lord, I have not always used restraint,
Those of us who carry our City's Badge can't always be a Saint".

I've had to work most Sunday's and I'm sorry I've been silent,
  Sometimes I've been a little tough, but our City Streets are violent.

I have never ignored a call for help, and rearly shook from fear
I've never been too big a man, to weep or shed a tear

I know I don't deserve a place among the people here.
They never wanted me around, except to calm their fear.

If you have a place for me O'Lord, it needn't be too Grand
I never expected, or had too much... and if you don't; I'll understand.

There was a silence about the throne, and then he gave his nod
The officer waited quietly to hear the judgement of his God.

"Step forward Officer, you've stated your case, and stated it well...

I’m giving you a post on Heaven's Streets. You're done your time in Hell."

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In The Line of Duty

The deepest sympathy of the community goes out to the wives and sons and daughters of all of the officers that have died while performing their public duty. Families of all of our injured and disabled officers, officers that have lost their vision, their ability to walk, use of arms etc. some will need, seeing eye dogs, and other types of service dogs, wheelchairs, or other specialized equipment to help these men, and women continue their lives.
Every one of these men, and women were injured, or killed while working to make things better for us. Each of them were fulfilling their job of protecting our lives, and property, a job that is dangerous at all times, and deadly all too often. 135 or more times since the department was founded in the 1729 and the first Watchman took to the streets to protect the public from those that would do us harm, Baltimore police have been killed in the line of duty; a tragic reminder of the risks to which we ask, and expect the men and women in our police department to expose themselves to daily, and especially during the nights in the city.
No day is safe, New Years Eve/Day 1938, Christmas Day of 1964 we lost officers; Valentine’s Day 1935 and 1954, Memorial Day 1962 and 1993, Independence Day 1889, Halloween 1935,  and on Good Friday 1976 we lost an Officer. The violence that stalks our streets is often underrated; Rookies and Veteran Policemen alike have found the deaths and unseen but constant presence as they go about their rounds. Add to this the number of serious injuries, injuries that disable, often crippling our police at such an alarming rate that there are no actual records kept.
For years the sun paper has been critical of police operations in the city, but claims to have never minimized the difficulties with the dangers of police service. The ordinary patrolman in particular has one of the most trying, and thankless jobs that public service has to offer, and certainly one of the most essential reports the Baltimore Sun. They went on to say, their concern is and has always been with the slipshod police management; the brass, in a top heavy department that makes the individual police efforts; "less effective than they might be, and thereby distracts from the courage and dedication of the men and women on the street".
The criticism will continue, but never without a continued, full awareness and respect, "We all owe, to such selfless guardians as the slain, the disabled, and all those that have worn, currently wear, or someday will wear; the Badge of a Police Officer for the Baltimore Police Department.

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Blinded Patrolman Wins Full Pension

The Sun (1837-1987); Dec 18, 1970;

pg. C22 

BLINDED PATROLMAN WINS FULL PENSION

A Central District Patrolman who was blinded in a 1967 gun battle has won his flight for a 100% disability pension.

The Board of Trustees of the fire and police pension system awarded Ret Officer Joseph B. Hoffman, 43, a $10,044 a year pension for life Wednesday. It was the first full pay disability award made by the trustees under the new ordinance that was passed primarily because of efforts of Patrolman Hoffman. In November, he picketed City Hall, arousing the sympathy of nearly every politician inside. The pension ordinance, which had been languishing for two years, was quickly resurrected and passed. It went into effect early this month. Patrolman Hoffman – on full paid medical leave since he was blinded – was scheduled to be pensioned off under the an old system that would have given him only about $6000 a year the new pension system will allow him to retire at full pay. “My family is really happy. My family is really happy,” patrolman Hoffman repeated over and over again at his Glen Burnie home yesterday. “That’s why I got out and walked and did what I did to have it the old pension system changed.” Patrolman Hoffman, the father of three children, said he plans to get trained and find a job. He has yet to decide what job to take. He was wounded in the head October 3, 1967, while trying to capture a burglary suspect. The wound force the removal of both eyes. His plight prompted a visit and a pair of cufflinks from then Gov. Agnew, and a funddrive by the police wives association that collected $21,000. The patrolman’s case gained further prominence in February a year ago when the police wives association charged at six Baltimore restaurant refused to serve him because he was accompanied by his seeing-eye dog Ritchie. The restaurants later apologized when informed of the state law permitting service to blind persons with Seeing Eye dogs. Firefighter Edward had tried, a pension fund board member, set a fireman and a policeman Lieut. also are being considered for full disability pension. Full disability under the ordinance is described as brain damage, or the loss of two arms hands eyes feet legs or any combination of the two.

 

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retired pgn
retired police

 

Disabled & Injured Police Officers The disabled men and women of our law Enforcement community are truly our Forgotten Law Enforcement Heroes. It has been said that our sacrifices in Iraq is to great a price to pay for our freedom and safety, and to prevent a repeat of 911. We pay that price every year in injury and death to our Law Enforcement personnel. Should we pull our Police off our streets because the price is to high to pay for our safety? We need to support, not abandon, those who fight for our freedom and safety where ever they serve

 

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Baltimore policeman shot in line of duty survives once again
Gene Cassidy gets life-saving liver transplant

 

By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun
8:14 PM EDT, September 14, 2012

Gene Cassidy thought he was lucky to survive being shot in the  head twice 25 years ago when he was a Baltimore policeman, so a second  near-death ordeal recently seemed unreal. Just 27 years old, Cassidy lost his sight after a man he was trying to arrest on an assault warrant fired at him. The shooting, and his survival, made Cassidy a legend in Baltimore police  ranks and became fodder for "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets,"  the book by David Simon, and later a TV series, about crime in  Baltimore. Last year, bad news struck again. This time Cassidy was diagnosed with end-stage cirrhosis of the liver caused by hepatitis C.  He contracted the disease from blood transfusions while being treated  all those years ago — in the days before blood was tested for the  disease.

Once again, Cassidy faced death. And again he has survived.

In June, the now 52-year-old Cassidy received a desperately needed liver  transplant. He shared his story Friday at a news conference at  University of Maryland Medical Center, where the surgery was performed. It wasn't an easy journey. He had to wait months for a transplant, and  Cassidy said his body and mind deteriorated. He refused to give up and  tried to stay positive, continually telling himself he was a fighter;  that he would continue to live.  "You keep going and swinging away," he said. Cassidy and his family began to suspect something was wrong in May 2011. His  entire body was swollen and his feet hurt so much that he couldn't walk. Doctors couldn't figure out what the problem was until a blood test  revealed the hepatitis. He became one of the thousands of baby  boomers who contracted the slow-progressing disease unknowingly and have been walking around with it for years. It is so prevalent that the  federal government recently called for all members of Cassidy's  generation to be tested for the disease. After the shooting,  Cassidy learned to live without sight. He earned a master's degree from  the Johns Hopkins University and went back to work teaching at the  city's police academy. His presence was a powerful message to recruits  about what could happen in the line of duty. His children, Lauren  and Kevin, now 24 and 21, respectively, hadn't been born when their dad  was shot. All they knew was the strong father who took them to Ravens  games and loved his job. "He was like any other dad, except he couldn't drive," said Lauren, who works for a staffing agency. Kevin said his dad didn't allow negative talk. "He always told us to stay positive and to never give up, no matter what it is," Kevin said. "He would tell us there is always someone in a worse  position than you." It was rough watching their dad succumb to  hepatitis, they said. He dropped 60 pounds from his muscular frame,  developed over years of daily workouts. He was always tired and  eventually had to stop working. Despite his illness, Cassidy kept the rest of the family hopeful. "Every time we would get down, he would say it's just a bump in the road," said his wife, Patti. Simon chronicled Cassidy's story in a March article in The Baltimore Sun. As  he interviewed Cassidy, the once-vibrant man looked gray and weak. Simon said the sight of Cassidy worried him. But Cassidy himself wasn't  worried. "We were scared. Gene wasn't," Simon said. "There is  something very Zen about the way he's dealt with everything since the  shooting." As the disease progressed, doctors said Cassidy needed a transplant to survive. But getting a transplant is not easy. There aren't enough donated livers  for everyone who needs one. Nearly 16,000 Americans, including 500 in  Maryland, are waiting for a liver transplant, said Dr. John LaMattina,  Cassidy's transplant surgeon. The medical community uses a  scoring system to give livers to the sickest patients as the organs  become available. Cassidy was never sick enough to get an organ. His doctors suggested he try living organ donation as an alternative. For  this procedure, a living person donates half of his or her liver. The  liver halves eventually regenerate, allowing both people to live. These  donors need to be the healthiest people and are often family members or  close friends. There was no shortage of people willing to give  Cassidy a piece of their liver. Lauren, Kevin and Patti all wanted to,  but couldn't for various reasons. Lauren's liver was too small, for  instance. Hundreds of police officers also came forward — all claiming  to be his brother. "It was the most tremendous outpouring of support I have ever seen," LaMattina said. Meanwhile, Cassidy's health continued to decline. He was disoriented and became  confused when talking to people. His abdomen was constantly swollen,  even as the rest of him became skeletal. When a living donor was  located finally, Cassidy's body was too frail for the operation.  Meanwhile, his sickness moved him higher on the list for a traditional  liver donation. He would just have to wait. "People have to be so sick to get a transplant," LaMattina said. The wait worried the doctor. Without a transplant soon, there was a chance  of death, LaMattina said. But one became available in June. Before the surgery, Cassidy told his family, "We will win." He told the team of doctors: "You know I'm a fighter." "I heard you are a fighter," one responded.

The surgery went well, and LaMattina said Cassidy should live a normal life.

The jaundice he had been suffering from disappeared right after the  surgery. Cassidy has had some complications common with transplants,  including a hernia. And he will have to take drugs for the rest of his  life to prevent his body from rejecting the new organ. But those are small inconveniences, he and LaMattina said. "Taking the medicine will become like brushing his teeth," said the doctor. Those who know him said Cassidy has a natural resiliency. "If anyone was going to pull through this, it was going to be him," said  Terrence Patrick McLarney, a detective sergeant in the homicide unit  when Cassidy was shot. Simon said it would have been a tragedy if a liver hadn't been found for Cassidy — someone who has made such an  imprint on Baltimore. "We would have failed him if we had not gotten him a liver," Simon said. Cassidy doesn't have a long bucket list now that he has eluded death twice.  Throughout his latest ordeal, he said, all he wanted was a sense of  normality. And it is still the simple things he looks forward to doing  again, like going back to work and attending Ravens games, as he has  every season since the team came to town. He's not sure when he'll be strong enough to do either, but he hopes it is soon. "You never know how many miracles you may see," Cassidy said. "I have to say I've seen one with this transplant."

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Patrolman Donald E. Fisher

Off Donald Fisher1

 

Courtesy Sergeant James Fisher (Son) MAN SHOOTS POLICEMAN IN FACE, FLEES Arresting Officer Had Just Called For Wagon For Suspect 1956 A suspected automobile thief whipped out a gun at a police call box at North and Greenmount avenues and fired into the mouth of a traffic patrolman late yesterday after the policeman had summoned a patrol wagon to pick up his prisoner. The officer, Patrolman Donald E. Fisher, 37, fired four shots at his Negro assailant, who escaped south on Greenmount and west on Lanvale street. Patrolman Fisher was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital, where it was reported the gunman's bullet had ricocheted off a denture, split the policeman's tongue, entered the roof of his mouth and lodged near his right ear. The hospital said last night he was in satisfactory condition and resting comfortably. It said the bullet had not been, recovered. Fires At Pursuers Witnesses at the scene of the shooting said the escaping car thief fired twice at men who pursued him on Greenmount. Preliminary reports were that two young men driving south on Greenmount toward North Avenue spotted a car stolen from one of them Monday night and forced them to the curb. The men, Harold S.Tabb,27,of the 3300 block Avondale Avenue, and Alan Gross, 27, of the 3900 block Maine Avenue, pulled the negro occupant from the car and turned him over to Patrolman Fisher. Patrolman Fisher called for a patrol wagon at 5:26 P.M. from the box at the Southwest corner of North and Greenmount. Second Call Comes A few minutes later a second came in from the box, this one asking for assistance. It was followed almost immediately by a third call for an ambulance for Patrolman Fisher. A police car reached the intersection before the ambulance and took the wounded officer to St Joseph's Hospital. Police said last night they did not know who had put in the second and third calls. They said there had been a scuffle at the call box after the first call, in which James C. Pierce, of the 400 block East North avenue, assisted Patrolman Fisher. Mr. Tabb and Mr. Gross. As police pieced together the next moments, the man under arrest who already had been frisked by the patrolman, pull a gun from his belt suddenly and fired. They said the assist call apparently had been placed during the struggle which preceded the first shot. Two bullets fired in the shooting hit the back window of Mr. Tabb's car. The stolen car belonged to Mr. Gross. Bullet Picked Up One spent bullet was picked up near the call box and sent to the crime laboratory. Police said it might be from a .32 caliber weapon. As the gunman ran south on Greenmount Avenue, Patrolman Frank Wrzosek of the Northeastern District, jumped in the Tabb car with Mr. Tabb, and they chased him two blocks before he disappeared. As soon as it was known Patrolman Fisher had fired at the man who shot him, police put out an order for a check of all hospitals and doctors on the chance the gunman had sought medical treatment. He was described as about 28 or 29 years old and 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing about 175 pounds. Wearing Jacket Witnesses said he was wearing a brown leather jacket and a gray hat. Central District police checked a house in the 1700 block Barclay street last night following a report that a man answering the description of the escaped gunman had been seen there. The Barclay street man was seen leaving the house in a black and white plaid jacket, a light hat with a black band and muddy shoes, and police relayed this information by radio to supplement the description already moved in connection with the city wide search for the gunman. Converge On Area Later police converged on the area north of the Pennsylvania Railroad's North avenue bridge at the Falls road. A Central District post patrolman had reported seeing a man who looked like the suspect there. Soon afterward police received further word that a man resembling the gunman had been seen leaving a shack on a Pennsylvania Railroad siding and running north on the tracks. Mrs. Fisher, wife of the patrolman, and their two sons, Donald,12 and James,11, arrived at the hospital at 6.15 P.M. in an inspector's car. After seeing her husband, Mrs. Fisher said he appeared to be doing all right. The Fishers, who live at 1608 Montpelier Street, have a third child, Barbara Ann, 14. Patrolman Fisher has been on the force for twelve years. He is a Motorcycle Officer. His denture is the result of his tangle last year with a young burglar armed with a chisel.

 

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Crossing Guard Helen Mackall

 

School Crossing Guard struck January 29th, 1970   School Crossing Guard Helen Mackall On January 29th, 1970 School Crossing Guard Helen Mackall was struck by an automobile while performing her duties at Lafayette and Wheeler Avenues. As a result of the injuries sustained in the accident, Mrs. Mackall's right leg was amputated just below the knee on February 6th, 1970 at Lutheran Hospital. In an effort to express their concern for Mrs. Mackall, the School Crossing Guards organized a fund raising campaign aided by Sergeant Charles Hellams of the Western District. The fund was presented to Mrs. Mackall by representatives of the School Crossing Guards on April 2, 1970. "Medal of Honor Recipient"

 

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Fisher Tells Of Shooting

 

Burglar, Chisel, False Teeth Save Patrolman Donald E. Fisher

 

Fisher was struck in the mouth by a bullet from a small, brass revolver fired by a suspected car thief he had caught.  The burly officer should be dead. He definitely is not. He sat up yesterday in his bed at St. Joseph's Hospital to greet his attractive wife, Anna, for the bullet was deflected by his denture and fell out of his mouth..  He has the denture, because on New Year's Day, 1954, a burglar he had apprehended lambasted him in the mouth with a 10 inch steel chisel, knocking all but four of his teeth out. A month later the police department paid for a full upper plate and a partial lower one.  "It's a funny thing, but I owe my life to that burglar“, Officer Fisher said yesterday.  The burglar was caught, tried and sentenced to a five year term, Fisher said. Even with all his teeth out, the tough policeman refused to let to let go of him.  Mrs. Fisher, who received the news that her husband had been shot in the bluntest, most cruel fashion, adds another coincidence to the case.  She says: "All I can say is thank God, and I hope he never has to the corner of Greenmount and North Avenues again. That sure is a bad luck corner for us."  That's the corner where Fisher was shot Tuesday afternoon: It is also the corner where 10 years ago Fisher, while on motorcycle duty, was struck by a car. 

He was chasing a speeding car on his motorcycle and was struck by another car which crashed the red light at the intersection. He received a concussion and was hospitalized for four days, Mrs. Fisher Said. "I asked him the other day to get transferred away from that corner and now he gets shot there." Mrs. Fisher had gone down that ill-fated corner to pick up her husband when he got off duty at 6 P. M. I saw all the commotion and asked what happened. Some fellow came over and said 'If you're waiting for Fisher, you might as well go'." As shocked and as frightened as she was by this remark, she was even more so, she said, when she climbed into the inspector's car and heard over the radio that her husband had been shot. It was not until later at the hospital that she learned he was not seriously hurt. The bullet which struck Officer Fisher in the mouth hit his denture, rattled around in his mouth, lacerated his tongue and fell to the ground. It was found the next day on the sidewalk. Neither of the Fishers know whether it was a steel denture or not. It looked like an ordinary set of false teeth. Dr. Linwood Ortel, dentist, who did the surgical and dental work on Fisher after his first injury, said his plates were made of acrylic resin, a material which is a member of the plastic group. 

This material, Dr. Ortel said, is very hard, light and durable. It certainly proved so when Fisher was shot. Dr. Ortel said Fisher has a complete upper denture made of this material and a partial lower denture. Fisher, who talked like a man with a sore tongue, said the shooting occurred when he was called by two men who had caught a Negro. They claimed the Negro had stolen their car.

Courtesy Sergeant James Fisher (Son)
Wounded patrolman consoled by wife

 

Patrolman Donald E. Fisher, shown with wife, Anna, credits denture with saving his life.

 

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Man, 29, Being Questioned In Shooting Of Officer

 

Police are questioning a 29 year old man arrested early today in connection with the shooting of Patrolman Donald E. Fisher late yesterday. Patrolman Fisher was reported in “satisfactory” condition at St. Joseph’s Hospital today. He was shot in the mouth by a suspected automobile thief at a Police call box at North and Greenmount Avenues. The suspect, a Negro, was taken into custody by two Traffic patrolmen at Calvert and Twentieth Streets at about 10 A.M. He was taken to Central District Police Headquarters for questioning. The shooting occurred yesterday at about 5:30 P.M. minutes after the alleged car thief was turned over to Patrolman Fisher by two men who said they had pulled him from a stolen automobile, Police gave this account of the shooting: Harold S. Tabb, 27, of the 3300 block Avondale Avenue, and Alan Gross, 27, of the 3900 Maine Avenue, were driving south on Greenmount Avenue toward North Avenue when they saw a car stolen from Gross Monday night.

 

On Traffic Duty

 

They forced it to the curb near the corner of North Avenue, collared its occupant and turned him over to Patrolman Fisher, a motorcycle officer who had, been on traffic duty at the intersection.  After frisking the man, Patrolman Fisher put in a call for a patrol wagon. The initial call was followed within minutes by two more calls, one requesting assistance and the second an ambulance for Patrolman Fisher.  Piecing together the chain of events following the first call; police said the suspect apparently began scuffling with the patrolman, Tabb and Gross and James C. Pierce, of the 400 block East North Avenue, who was attempting to assist the officer.  Police believe the suspect then pulled a gun from his belt, which Patrolman Fisher had failed to notice, and shot the officer in the mouth at close range. The bullet crashed into a denture in Patrolman Fisher's mouth, split his tongue and entered the roof of his mouth.  The officer drew his own gun and fired four times at the fleeing man Witnesses at the scene reported that the man returned the fire, shooting twice as he fled south on foot down Greenmount Avenue.

 

Shots Fired In Pursuit

He was pursued by Patrolman Frank Wrzosek, of the Northeastern District, and Tabb in the latter's automobile. One of the shots fired by the fleeing man struck their car and was later found on the floorboards.

 

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Suspect Freed In Fisher Assault

 

Police investigating the shooting of Patrolman Donald E. Fisher released a 29-year-old man, yesterday afternoon after questioning him for several hours.  The man, a Negro, had been picked up by two traffic patrolmen about 10 A,M. at Calvert and Twentieth streets. Patrolman Fisher was shot in the mouth by a suspected car thief late Tuesday at a police call box at North and Greenmount Avenues. St. Joseph's Hospital reported last night he was "doing very well."

 

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Policeman's Hard Luck Continues

 

Patrolman Donald E. Fisher described by fellow traffic officers as '''the hard-luck guy." last night suffered a possible heart attack as he was preparing to go on duty. The 37 year old motorcycle officer only recently recovered from a gunshot wound in the mouth he received while arresting a suspected automobile thief in March.  In January 1955, he was struck, in the face "by chisel when he and another patrolman arrested a burglar attempting to break into a tailor shop.  Fellow officers rushed the stricken patrolman to Mercy Hospital from the Police Headquarters Building in a squad car.  A hospital physician, who described his condition as fair, said Patrolman Fisher had a possible coronary attack.

 

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Fisher Better After Attack

 

Baltimore hard luck patrolman, Donald E. Fisher, thirty- seven, was reported in “satisfactory" condition in Mercy Hospital today after suffering a heart attack as he prepared to, take his post last night. He only recently recovered from a bullet wound in his mouth. He received it as he arrested a suspected auto thief in March. His denture miraculously saved his life. Eighteen months ago, he was struck in the face with a chisel when he another policeman arrested a burglar.

 

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Motorist Is Arrested After 7-Mile Chase

 

Anne Arundel county police reported early this morning that following a 7-mile chase from near the Baltimore City line to Sunset Beach. John J. Cleckner, 23, was apprehended as he jumped from his car near his home on Stoney Creek Road, Sunset Beach.  According to Police, Cleckner was seen traveling at a high rate of speed on Pennington Avenue by Traffic Officers, James Devoe and Donald Fisher. Radioing ahead to Anne Arundel County Police to meet them in the chase, the two officers attained a speed of over 70 miles an hour, they said, before arresting Cleckner at his home.

 

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Taxi Driver Fined

 

Louis Horowitz, 1700 block Ruxton Avenue, whose cab was alleged to have caused injury to Motorcycle Patrolman Donald Fisher at Greenmount Avenue and Thirty-Fifth street on December 16, got off with a $5 fine for making a left turn from a right-hand curb,  It was testified that both cab and motorcycle veered sharply in opposite directions, to avoid collision and that, the motorcycle overturned. Horowitz was charged with reckless driving, but was dismissed on that count.  "However," Magistrate Barrett said, "When you make a left turn from a right curb you can't escape the consequences."  

 

Off Stanley Sierakowski

 

One Police Officer Killed One Officer shot and seriously wounded April 24, 1970   Officer Stanley Sierakowski Officer Stanley Sierakowski, a fifteen year veteran of the department, assigned to the Central District was shot and seriously wounded on Friday April 24, 1970 while working in the 1200 blk. Myrtle Ave. His partner Officer Donald W. Sager, a twelve year veteran, was shot and killed in this incident "Medal of Honor Recipient"

 

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Off Alphonso Wright

 

Traffic Officer Hurt September 9th, 1970   Officer Alphonso Wright On September 9th, 1970, Officer Alphonso Wright, assigned to the Traffic Enforcement Section, suffered extensive in juries while assisting a stalled motorist in the 3300 block of S. Hanover Street. Officer Wright had spotted the vehicle at about 8: 10 on the morning of the 9th. After pushing the automobile out of traffic, he left, and returned with a small container of gasoline which he used in an attempt to restart the vehicle

 

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Off James McFillin Off Daniel Calhoun    
Officer James L. McFillin                                               Officer Daniel J. Calhoun

 

TWO OFFICERS WOUNDED October, 1970 In recent unrelated incidents two young police officers were injured by gunshot wounds within a fourteen hour span of time. Both officers were involved in what might be considered routine patrol efforts: however, the results were far from routine   Officer James L. McFillin, Jr The first incident started casually enough, when Officer James L. McFillin, Jr., Tactical Section, attempted to stop an out-of-state automobile. An auto chase resulted and, after several parked cars were struck, a foot chase began. The chase ended in an alley and, in an exchange of gunfire, both Officer McFillin, and the suspect were injured by gunshot wounds. Fortunately, Officer McFillin suffered only superficial body wounds, while the suspect was rushed to the hospital in poor condition   Officer Daniel J. Calhoun The second incident was the result of a call for service to which Officer Daniel J. Calhoun, Southern District, responded and was felled by another assailant's bullets. The officer was taken to the hospital with a serious chest wound and the suspect was treated at a hospital for wounds suffered in a subsequent exchange of shots by other officers. Officer Calhoun has progressed very well and is on his way to complete recovery. The two incidents underline the fact that the most routine police matters can suddenly become an issue of tragedy and suffering

 

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This is the story of a retired Officer (P/O Frederick Dickens) who waited 43 years to receive his Citation of Valor for being shot on 17 July 1971. He was shot three times (one in each leg, and one in his right shoulder) through our program he was awarded his Citation of Valor yesterday at the Academy. He stopped in with his paperwork in his hand and ask if they could just give him the ribbon for on his chest. When they found out, what had happened to him, they ran around and threw together an ad hoc ceremony since the department does not include OUR retirees in the awards process. Officer Fred Dickens was introduced to our new casino unit and when they learned that he waited 43 years for this award, THEY PAID FOR IT!!! He broke down a little as they gave him a standing ovation and took pictures with him as he told his story. He did this with both training class and they too gave him a hero’s sendoff with full salutes.

I want to congratulate Officer Frederick Dickens for this honor, along with all the other officers that have received this award retroactively. I also want to thank Officer Bob-Carisa Himes for not forgetting a retired hero, is still a hero... God bless you brother


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Off Frederick Dickens Off Charles Smith
Officer Frederick Dickens                                            Officer Charles P. Smith

 

Officers Wounded In Line Of Duty JULY 1971 Tragedy was averted in mid-July when two Baltimore Police Officers were seriously assaulted in unrelated incidents   Officer Frederick Dickens On Saturday, July 17, 1971Central District Officer Frederick Dickens was working Car No. 141 in the vicinity of Laurens Street and Jordan Alley. About 7 :28 P.M. he was approached by a young child who reported that there was a man in the alley armed with a gun and allegedly threatening two citizens. Officer Dickens entered the alley in his patrol vehicle and immediately observed a man fitting the description given by the child. As the suspect began walking away from the scene, Officer Dickens left his vehicle and ordered him to stop. Without hesitation the suspect turned and fired two shots, both of which struck the Officer's legs. Rushing towards him, the assailant attempted to again shoot the Officer in the head. Despite being wounded a third time, Officer Dickens managed to pull his service revolver and fatally wound his attacker. The twenty-three year old Patrolman was transported to Maryland General Hospital where he was admitted in fair condition. Officer Dickens has been a member of the Department less than two years Officer Charles P. Smith, 31 years old, was on routine patrol in the rear of the 3200 block of Reisterstown Road on Monday, July 19, 1971when he surprised two suspects attempting to break into a building. After spotlighting the subjects and calling for assistance, Officer Smith ordered them against a wall where he began searching them. During the search one of the subjects turned and grabbed the Officer's service revolver. A struggle ensued and the gun discharged wounding Patrolman Smith in the left side. Both suspects immediately. fled the scene. The Officer was transported to Provident Hospital where he was admitted in good condition at about 4:30 A.M. He was satisfactorily released from the hospital on Wednesday, July 21,1971 Officer Smith, a Randallstown resident, is a ten year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department   Courtesy Officer Kenneth Hayden

 

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 Officer Kenneth Hayden

Off Kenneth Hayden 1971

Gunman Kills 5, Wounds A Police Officer at paintbrush factory here November 23, 1971 An employee of a Southwest Baltimore paintbrush factory opened fire inside the plant yesterday afternoon killing five co-workers and wounding a sixth and a policeman before being critically wounded by police bullets. Police said the gunman who carried two rifles and wore green military camouflage fatigues, apparently went berserk and moved from “building to building and shot everyone he saw ” The killer was “yelling as he shot, laughing, wild hysterical laughter,” an officer said. But the gunman calmly asked one witness to help him get out of the plant with his rifles. The assailant was identified as Raymond D. Ferrell-el, 30, of the 1300 block Upton Street. He was shot once in the stomach and was listed in critical condition at St. Agnes Hospital last night. Four of the victims were pronounced dead at the scene, the PPG Industries factory, in the 3200 block Frederick Avenue. The fifth died at St. Agnes Hospital shortly after admission. The dead were identified by police as: William Cook, Sr. 30, of the 200 block South Fulton Street. Vernon Ferguson, 23, of the 3100 block Leeds Avenue. Allen Ringley, 37, of the 4400 block Old Frederick Road. Edward Yienger, 35, of the first block Bremmer Drive, Glen Burnie. Listed in serious condition with gunshot wounds of the chest was Robert Lock,45, of the 500 block South Longwood street. Officer Treated Patrolman Kenneth Hayden who was wounded in the left knee, by Mr. Ferrell-el, was treated at St. Agnes Hospital and released. Police said the assailant was a Vietnam veteran, was armed with a 30-30 semi-automatic hunting rifle and an M-1 carbine. No one could offer a rational explanation for the shootings. Russell L. Smith, the plant manager, said he knew of no conceivable motive for the outburst. He said Mr. Ferrell-el was formerly a teacher’s aide in the city school system and had worked six months for PPG during which time he had not been disciplined and had not shown hostility toward his supervisors. Arthur W. Ricker, manager of financial services, gave the following account of the shooting. Mr. Ferrell-el called in sick for his 7:30 A.M. job dipping brush handles in vats of lacquer. About 3 P.M. he was seen on the first floor of the shipping department, where he shot Mr. Fergson, who was leaving a rest room. The suspect then ran through the shipping department, as a fire alarm was sounded, into the alley in the rear of the complex, where a dozen employees gathered after evacuating the building. The gunman then raced to the dipping room building and climbed the stairs to the second floor, where he shot Ringley, Mr. Cook, and Mr. Yienger. He crossed the catwalk back to the second floor of the shipping department building, where he shot Mr. Gilbert. Mr. Lock hearing the shooting ran up the stairs to the second floor, confronted the killer, and was shot twice in the chest. Mr. Lock fell down the stairs and was helped to his feet by Mr. Smith, who had also come to investigate. Police said that one employee struggled with the gunman during the shooting and broke one of the rifles. The gunman then ran down the staircase, across the inner court complex to the main office building and out the front door, crossing the street to a fire station. The rifleman reloaded on the open sidewalk, fired several shots at the PPG plant and shot Patrolman Hayden, who arrived in a squad car in front of the plant. Police said one bullet struck the left fender of the car. After exchanging several shots with police, the assailant was felled by a single shot to the stomach by Patrolman Richard Mioduszewski, who happened on the incident on his way to work. Mr. Smith said he saw the gunman with a rifle and a pistol, but Police could not find the handgun. They said a receipt for the M-1 carbine was found in Mr. Ferrell-el’s jacket pocket, along with a bag of candy. Herbert Russell, another employee who saw the gunman run to the rear of the plant during the shooting, said he, “looked very dazed, strictly a dazed expression.” But he offered no comment on the reason for the shooting. Officer Kenneth Hayden is a “MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT" This was one of the largest mass murders in Baltimore City.

 

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Traffic Officer Injured October 24, 1972 Officer Ronald Tuefer was thrown from his horse on Tuesday, October 24, 1972 in the 200 block of Cross Street and received severe injuries to his head. The incident occurred in mid-afternoon when the Officer's horse, "Zeik," reared up for no apparent reason, back stepped, and then fell over backwards, onto Officer Tuefer. The Officer was rushed to Mercy Hospital where he was X-rayed and treated by four staff physicians. He remains confined there, on the 12th floor. He is recovering satisfactorily. The Officer has been a member of the Mounted Unit since 1968

 

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Officer Thomas E. WhalenSeptember 1973 

Off Thomas Whalen

Police Officer Ambushed Officer Thomas E. Whalen   Officer Thomas E. Whalen In early September 1973 it begins getting dark a little bit after 7:30 p.m. and by 8:00 o'clock the shadows have lengthened and night-time begins to shroud many of the daylight forms of the city. The woods in Cylburn Park were outlines in the headlights as Northern District Officer Thomas Whalen drove slowly up the narrow roadway which leads through the woods to Greenspring Avenue. Just as the homes, which sit across the street from the park, came into view Officer Whalen heard someone shout; "  Hey Officer, wait a minute!" Thinking that someone needed assistance he backed partially off the roadway and was approached by two men. As he turned toward the window to speak to the man approaching from the drivers side Officer Whalen perceived a handgun being pushed into his face. In one instant it took the suspect to fire the weapon Officer Whalen, in the confining area of the driver's seat, was able to jerk his head back and slightly to the side, a move which undoubtedly saved his life. The bullet struck him just over the bridge of the nose and exited near the right temple. Officer Whalen immediately took additional evasive action, to avoid further injury, by rolling out of the patrol car, across the roadway and into a grassy area. In the dark, and away from the lights of his vehicle he fired a shot, then made his way back to the car where he radioed for assistance. Northern District Officer Clyde Andrews was walking his foot post in the 4900 block Poe Avenue when he heard, on his handi-talkie, calls for assistance in the woods of Cylburn Park. He flagged down a passing taxi cab and arrived at the scene to find his fellow officer, bleeding from the grave head-wound. The cab driver transported Officer Whalen to Sinai Hospital just a few blocks away. Officer Andrews began the follow up work immediately. Within moments after the shooting units from the Northern, Northwestern, and Western Districts, the Tactical Unit and the Criminal Investigation Division began arriving at the scene. The entire park area was encircled by police cars. Airmen from the Helicopter Unit flew overhead lighting the thick underbrush so that teams of searchers could move through the woods in search of suspects. K-9 units, who responded, assisted in a thorough search. Unfortunately the suspects were not located. Officer Whalen, meanwhile, had walked into the Emergency Room at Sinai Hospital. Doctors on the staff immediately set to work attempting to assess the damage caused by the head-wound. X-ray tracked the path of the bullet from its entrance point, through the area of the right eye and out through the side of the head. Smashed bone surrounded the exit wound. Specialists worked through the night determining what damage had been caused and what treatment would be necessary. Finally, the most difficult decision was made after careful study and evaluation; doctors were compelled to remove the severely damaged eye. Throughout the evening Officer Whalen remained conscious. Even while being treated in the emergency room he saw and sometimes spoke briefly with his fellow officers. Later, as the doctors and surgeons worked the Police Commissioner visited, spoke with the officer's wife and the surgeons. Other members of the Command Staff had begun arriving at the hospital earlier in the evening, and there was an almost constant stream of concerned visitors rendering all assistance possible even when moral support was the most that could be offered. After the surgery the Police Commissioner paid another visit. As he pinned on the Medal of Valor he noted that Officer Whalen was well along the road to recovery even to the point of discussing a planned vacation trip West. The conversation turned to future plans and discussion of getting out of the hospital. The doctors released him on Friday, September 7, and Officer Whalen returned home to surroundings both friendly and familiar and very far removed from that road in the woods of Cylburn Park.

 

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Off Thomas Cave     Off Charles Walker
Officers Thomas R. Cave                           Charles A. Walker

Central District Officers Wounded December 1973   Officer Thomas Cave Both officers heard the radio dispatcher announce that a man with a gun had been sighted at Gay and Baltimore Streets. Officers Thomas R. Cave and Charles A. Walker, working Central District foot-posts, responded to the scene. Upon their arrival in the middle of Baltimore's "Block" they were told that a man with a gun was in one of the night spots located in the 400 block East Baltimore Street. Leaving the brightly lighted sidewalk they entered the establishment and were directed to the two men seated at the far end of the dimly lighted bar.   Officer Charles Walker It was moments before midnight as the officers approached the suspects who had apparently spent this day after Christmas visiting some of the city's night spots. After observing that the lighting was somewhat better in a rear room of the establishment the officers requested that the suspects accompany them to that area. As the four entered a hallway leading to two small rooms the shorter of the two suspects suddenly opened fire. In the ensuing exchange of gunfire the officers were wounded; Officer Cave was shot through both legs and Officer Walker received a wound which fractured his right arm. The gunman was mortally wounded and his partner received a wound of the chest. Employees and patrons of the bar were still seeking cover behind the bar and tables nearby as officers, responding to a Signal 13, entered to summon medical aid for the injured parties. The on-the-scene investigation commenced immediately. The wounded officers as well as the civilian who had been wounded in the chest were taken to nearby Mercy Hospital for treatment. All were admitted for additional treatment and observation. Investigators from the Criminal Investigation Division discovered, a day later, that the mortally wounded suspect was an escapee from a Western Maryland detention facility. It was learned that he had been convicted of the robbery/murder of a Prince George's County taxicab driver in 1968 and that he had escaped from a work detail on Greenmount Avenue in Baltimore in October of 1973. The second suspect was released from the hospital the next morning to face charges in connection with the incident.

 

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Off Calvin Gene Higdon

 Officer Calvin Gene Higdon

Police Officer Wounded July 30, 1974   Officer Calvin Gene Higdon Shortly after 3 :00 o'clock on Tuesday, July 30, 1974 Officer Calvin Gene Higdon left his desk in the Fingerprint Section of the Laboratory Division and headed for his private auto. The afternoon was hot as he walked toward the 300 block N. Exeter Street, where that morning he was fortunate in locating a free parking space. As Officer Higdon unlocked the door and began to enter his car he heard approaching footsteps and then a male voice state, "Don't move man." Upon turning he faced two armed suspects and immediately drew his service revolver. He pulled the trigger two times, but the gun misfired leaving him at the mercy of the robbers. As one assailant stepped back Officer Higdon attempted to push the other off balance. At this point the suspects fired, striking the Officer in both legs. He then fell to the ground as the second suspect grabbed his weapon. They both ran and were last seen in the area of the projects in the 1000 block of Orleans Street. Patrol Units responded quickly, as a nurse who was in the area applied first aid. He had been struck three times, the left knee, the upper left leg and in the right knee. He was transported by Ambulance to Mercy Hospital where members of the staff stopped the bleeding and began blood transfusions. Officer Hidgon's condition was posted as guarded as Doctors determined the extent of his injuries and prepared to operate. At last report Officer Higdon, a nineteen year veteran with the Department, was in satisfactory condition and an operation was performed on both legs.

 

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Four Officers Wounded In Gun FigOfficer Alric Mooreht October 31, 1974   Officer Alric Moore The streets of West Baltimore were almost deserted as Officer Alric K. Moore, of the Western District began trying-up doors on his post in the early morning hours of Thursday, October 31, 1974. While approaching a bar in the 1600 block of West Baltimore Street he noticed that the side door was ajar. Closer examination revealed fresh pry marks and he immediately called for back-up units. When other officers arrived they discovered that the juke box and other items had been removed. Further investigation revealed a trail of scuff marks, left by the heavy record player, leading down the alley to the rear porch of a house on Fayette Street. Officer Garry Dresser With the front of the building covered Officer Gary W. Dresser and Officer Moore approached the closed door that partly blocked by the stolen juke box. As they got onto the porch of the darkened house rapid-fire gun shots rang out from inside striking Officer Moore in the right shoulder and wounding Officer Dresser in the hand as he dove for cover. As Officer Dresser helped the wounded Officer out of the line of fire Officer Glenn D. Hauze was hit in the right shoulder by a second burst of gunfire as he rushed to their aid. "Medal of Honor Recipient" Officer Glenn Hauze Back-up units responded quickly and tightly sealed off the area. The gunman moved from one window to another firing short bursts from his semi-automatic 45 caliber rifle, as the officers returned fire and Officers Hauze and Moore were rushed to the hospital. One of the bursts struck Officer Joseph E. Hlafka wounding him in the jaw, back shoulder and both arms as he took up a position in a near-by yard. Officer Hlafka was removed and rushed to an area hospital as the officers returned fire and attempted to talk the suspect out of Officer Garry Dresserthe house. The suspect moved to the front and officers continued to ask him to surrender and throw his weapon out. Soon the semi-automatic was dropped from a second floor window. It rested on the front steps as officers cautiously approached the front door. As they edged towards the entrance the suspect yelled, "put your guns away and I'll give up." Officer Charles Thrush holstered his service revolver and advised the suspect that he was going to handcuff him. As Officer Thrush walked towards him, the gunman grabbed the semi-automatic rifle lying next to the steps. Sergeant Anthony Sarro, of the Southwestern District, warned Officer Thrush, who dove for cover, and as the suspect began to raise the weapon Sergeant Sarro fired one round from his shotgun.   Officer Joseph Hlafka The suspect then dropped his weapon and retreated back into the house. After the other occupants of the dwelling came out, the officers entered the premises. The suspect was found dead in the hallway on the third floor. A search of the house revealed a recently stolen 357 magnum revolver. The weapon had been taken in an assault and robbery the day before in the 2000 block of W. Pratt Street. Officers Dresser and Hauze were treated at area hospitals and released. Officer Moore and HIafka were admitted to Bon Secours Hospital.

 

Officer Joseph Hlafka           Officer Glenn Hauze

 

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Officer Looses his Life, 2nd Officer Seriously Wounded

 30 November 1974

Officer Greiner Loses FiOfficer Martin Greinerght For Life Officer John Burns shot and seriously wounded November 30, 1974   Officer Martin Greiner It was just about two in the morning, on Saturday, November 30, 1974 when Officer Martin J. Greiner, assigned to 512 Unit of the Northern District, received a call to 27th Street and Huntingdon Avenue for a report of a man discharging a firearm. He was just a block away from the location in question and informed the communications dispatcher of the fact as he guided his patrol car onto Huntingdon Avenue. He was at the scene in no time and observed four persons, two men and two women walking toward him. He exited his vehicle and before there was an opportunity for him to draw his service revolver he was felled in a volley of shots. Knocked over backward, Officer Greiner radioed for assistance and immediately disseminated a description of his assailant. Within less than two minutes of the original call, and as back-up units were beginning to converge on the scene they had been provided with a detailed description of the wanted assailant. The "Signal 13" brought units from the Northern, Central and Northeastern Districts to the area. A suspect, who perfectly matched the description provided by the wounded officer, was spotted running across the 2600 block of Mace Avenue. He was running in an easterly direction and responding units took up the chase on foot. After a few moments the suspected gunman was cornered in front of a residence in the 2600 block of North Charles Street. Reports indicate the suspect immediately began resisting attempts by the officers to place him under arrest. He had, according to the arresting officers, to be held by several of them in order to allow the placement of restraining devices on his wrists. While the suspect was being apprehended Officer Greiner was being transported ,to Union Memorial Hospital for treatment of two gunshot wounds. Although critically wounded he was conscious when officers brought in the suspect for positive identification. As medical personnel prepared to take Officer Greiner to X-Ray he was able to confirm the identification. At this point the suspect lunged at the wounded officer and had to be restrained from resuming his attack on the victim. Once outside Union Memorial Hospital's accident room the suspect began to forcefully resist the escorting officers. Several policemen were struck and kicked as additional devices were placed upon the suspect for added protection and security. A cruising patrol wagon delivered the suspect to Mercy Hospital for treatment of abrasions. After complaints, on the part of the suspect that he had sustained additional injuries not immediately apparent to personnel at the hospital, he was admitted for observation, and assigned to a private room on the eighth floor. A detail of two Northern District Officers was placed on the room in order to guard the prisoner and ensure against any attempt at escape.   Officer John Burns At 4:00 p.m. Officers John E. Burns and John J. Provenza J r. of the Northern District were assigned to the guard detail at Mercy Hospital. At roll-call they had learned that Officer Greiner was in the intensive care unit at Union Memorial Hospital where he had undergone two extensive operations to repair damage caused by gunshot wounds sustained earlier in the day. The beginning of the detail was routine . . . medical personnel visited the suspect and the officers maintained their watch. The suspect, according to reports, was complaining about a number of imagined or real difficulties and nurses instructed the officers to call for assistance if they felt the patient was in distress and in need of attention. Shortly before six o'clock the suspect told the officers that he needed to go to the bathroom and asked them to leave the room. This request was refused which is normal procedure during a "guarding" situation. A nurse came into the room several times instructing the officers to call if additional assistance was needed. At this point the suspect was sitting on the edge of his hospital bed and was, as Officer Burns observed, havOfficer John Burnsing difficulty keeping his balance, at least that appeared to be the problem. In order to prevent the suspect from falling from the bed Officer Burns approached to steady him. Officer Provenza who was standing in the doorway had an obscured view of the suspect at this particular moment. A quick movement, by the suspect, caught the attention of Officer Provenza just as his partner called for assistance. At the same time two shots were fired and Officer Burns fell to the floor. Officer Provenza fired a single shot at the suspect who, with finger on the trigger, was pointing the other officer's weapon in his direction. He then grabbed the weapon, discarding it in a chair safe from the reach of the victim who by this time was on the floor struggling with the wounded officer. Both Policemen radioed Signal 13's in order to bring additional Officers to the scene. Medical personnel, hearing the gunshots, were entering the room just as Officer Provenza pulled his partner to the safety of the outside corridor. Emergency medical treatment on both the officer and suspect began immediately. Both required surgery for gunshot wounds to the abdomen. Witnesses to the earlier of the two assaults against members of the Department cooperated with investigating officers who were prepared to place the appropriate charges upon the expected discharge of the suspect prior to the second shooting incident. On December 3, 1974 a Baltimore Criminal Court Grand Jury indicted the suspect, William E. Tevas III, charging him with attempting to kill Officer Greiner in the first shooting incident and with attempting to kill Officers Burns and Provenza in the second incident at Mercy Hospital. Assistant State's Attorney Howard Gersh who heads the Violent Crimes Liaison Unit, which assists the Department's Crimes Against Persons Section, says Tevas was also charged with attempt to escape, with the robbery of Officer Burns' service revolver and with using a handgun in the commission of a: felony.

 

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 McKinley Johnson
"Mac" McKinley Johnson, Jr.

 “Mac” Johnson Dies From Wounds December 30, 1975   "Mac" McKinley Johnson, Jr. For the past five years members of the Department have been greeted by McKinley J. Johnson, Jr. as they signed vehicles in and out of the Motor Pool, or just stopped by to visit. He was always ready to help the new man and knew almost everyone by name. His willingness to help extended beyond work. During Christmas Eve while most people were preparing for the Holidays with their loved ones Mr. Johnson was always found distributing food baskets for needy inner city families. The Holiday spirit was high as Mr. Johnson and some friends worked in an area cocktail lounge readying the last of the many food baskets to be handed out. This good cheer ended when he noticed that a can of meat was missing as a patron, who was just lingering by the basket, began to leave. Realizing that the patron was the only one who could have taken the food he had just placed there, Mr. Johnson followed him onto the street. As he confronted him with the theft, the suspect drew a revolver and shot four times. The gunman hit his mark and as Mr. Johnson fell to the ground he fled. An ambulance transported him to an area hospital as Officers and Detectives began their investigation. As everyone was enjoying the Holidays Mr. Johnson struggled to survive. He lost his fight for life on Christmas evening as a result of complications from his wounds. Homicide Detectives worked throughout the night and the next day gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses. Their efforts paid off and an arrest warrant was obtained for a 27 year old suspect.

 

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 Detective Paul Karaskavicz, Jr.
39 December, 1975

Close Call December 30, 1975   DetecDetective Paul Karaskavicz Jrtive Paul Karaskavicz, Jr. for Detectives Allan Williams and Paul A. Karaskavicz Jr. of the Criminal Investigation Divisions Property Crimes Section, December 30th began as a normal one with the usual number of follow-ups and warrants to serve. In the afternoon they decided to look for a juvenile wanted on a burglary warrant and who was known to hang out in the 400 block S. Lehigh St. As they neared the area they spotted the juvenile who broke and ran as the Detectives exited their vehicle and identified themselves. Detective Karaskavicz began chasing the subject on foot as Detective Williams broadcast the information and then joined the chase in his radio car. As they zig-zagged through the alleys the 16 year old youth turned and fired a shot at Detective Kamskavicz grazing his left arm. He fell to the sidewalk, recovered and began to resume the chase. As he did the youthful gunman fired a second shot which went through the Detective's coat narrowly missing him. At this point Detective Karaskavicz was able to return fire as they continued through the alleys. When he turned a corner the gunman dove behind a wall in an attempt to hide. Detective Williams and Karaskavicz converged on the area and an alert citizen pointed out the suspect's hiding place. The Detectives closed in and as they did the gunman pointed his weapon at Detective Karaskavicz who ordered him to freeze, the suspect didn't and he shot once striking the juvenile in the buttocks. The suspect was rushed to an area hospital and later charged with assault with intent to murder. Detective Karaskavicz was treated for a superficial wound and returned to duty.

 

Devider Officer Theodore Staab

 Officer Theodore Staab

Central District Officer Wounded March 1975   Officer Theodore Staab While Officer Theodore E. Staab, Central District, was turning onto Baltimore Street driving to work, two males entered a bar in the 1300 block, produced sawed-off shotguns and announced a hold-up. As they fled out the door with the money in a cigar box the bartender set off the audible alarm. The loud bell and two suspects running across Baltimore Street with a cigar box alerted Officer Staab to possible trouble as he neared the intersection. He followed the suspects in his car to the 1400 block of E. Fairmount Avenue, where he pulled in front of them. As he jumped from his vehicle to confront the two men, one produced a sawed-off shotgun and fired at the uniformed officer. Pellets struck Officer Staab in the face, arm and thigh. He recovered from the impact quickly and returned fire from his service revolver as the gunmen fled in opposite directions. A helpful cab driver spotted the wounded officer and stopped to help, and as he did a bystander grabbed the officer's service revolver. Officer Staab, a three year veteran, was taken in the cab to a nearby hospital for treatment. Central and Southeastern District officers and detectives immediately began an intensive investigation. They obtained a positive identification of the suspect who took the officer's gun and arrested him within three hours and later located the revolver. The search for the hold-up suspects who shot Officer Staab is continuing

 

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Officer Jerome Wilkins  Officer Joseph Dobrosielsky
   Officer Jerome Wilkins            Off Joseph Dobrosielsky

Northwestern District Officer Wounded September 1975 Officer Jerome Wilkins When a citizens flagged down Northwestern District Officers Jerome Wilkins and Joseph Dobrosielsky both believed him when he stated that he had just been robbed by 2 armed subjects. They broadcast a description of the suspects and, believing that they might still be nearby, the officers requested the alleged victim to accompany them to aid in identification while they cruised the area. As they drove, the passenger said he recognized one of the hold-up men and directed the officers to an alley where he pointed out a house. As they looked, Officer Dobrosielsky felt a hard object against his neck. The subject then told Officer Wilkins to give up his revolver or his partner would die. The assailant reached over the seat for the Officer's weapon and a struggle for possession followed. In an effort to distract the man's attention, Officer Wilkins hit the accelerator and drove into a telephone pole. At the point of impact, three shots were fired from the Officer's service revolver. The first went through Officer Wilkins' holster and struck his thumb. The other two shots were fired at such close range that they caused powder burns on Officer Dobrosielsky's back as they barely missed both officers and went through the windshield of the vehicle.   Officer Joseph Dobrosielski Both officers immediately exited the radio car as the shots rang out. While Officer Dobrosielsky was recovering from a fall, he saw the suspect fire another shot at Officer Wilkins. He drew his own service revolver and fired a round at the gunman who then began running down the alley. The Officer gave chase exchanging shots with him until the gunman fell to the ground. Officer Wilkins called for assistance on the radio and then rushed to his partner's aid. As back-up units arrived Officer Dobiosielsky removed the gun from the suspect's control and Officer Wilkins was rushed to an area hospital where he was treated for his wounds and released. The suspect was pronounced dead at the scene. Further investigation revealed that the object placed against Officer Dobrosielsky's neck to obtain Officer Wilkins' gun was a toy pistol. A check of Officer Dobrosielsky's damaged Walkie-Talkie revealed it had apparently deflected one of the shots fired at the Officer by the suspect. Officer Wilkins' service revolver revealed that the assailant had fired all six rounds at the officers. It has not been determined why the suspect was so intent upon obtaining the officers revolvers nor if his alleged hold-up story was true. A fingerprint check on the deceased suspect revealed an extensive arrest history and an outstanding armed assault and robbery warrant

 

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Off-Duty Officer Wounded November 15,1975 Officer Francis Miller, a twenty-four year veteran assigned to the Headquarters Security Unit of the Property Division, spent a leisurely day off on November 15th. Around 8:00 p.m. he had just returned home after dropping off his wife at a local meeting and was walking across the porch when he heard movement behind him. As he turned to see who was there a shot rang out. Without warning one of the two armed assailants shot Officer Miller in the chest. They both immediately pounced upon the wounded officer who was so quickly overwhelmed that he did not have an opportunity to reach for his off-duty revolver. The suspects removed his wallet and gun and then fled on foot across the school yard. Officer Miller was rushed to an area hospital by his son. Members of the hospital staff quickly stabilized the officer and at last report he was listed in fair condition

 

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Officer Alvin Martin

Officer Alvin Martin 

Officer Wounded February 28, 1976   Officer Alvin Martin The activity on the streets of southeast Baltimore was slowing at 1 :00 A.M. as Officer David N. Datsko, Southeastern District, returned to his patrol vehicle parked in the unit block of South Ann Street on February 28, 1976. He had just finished an investigation of a hit and run accident and was about to enter his car when the suspect walked up to him. They stood outside of the vehicle as the man vehemently argued that he had not caused any damage to a parked car. Officer Datsko patiently explained that a report had been made and advised the man to report the incident to his insurance company. The man turned and walked back to his house. Officer Datsko entered his vehicle and was about to leave when Officer Alvin E. Martin pulled along side and asked if Officer Datsko had an extra M.I. Report. He gave Officer Martin the report and suddenly a shot rang out. Officer Martin's windshield shattered' and he felt a sharp pain in his chest and shoulder. He opened the door of the car and rolled to the ground. Officer Datsko immediately called for additional back-up units and took cover behind his car. The officer believed that the shot had come from the same house that the hit and run suspect had entered. Back-up units quickly arrived on the scene. Officer Martin, however, could not be immediately evacuated because he was still in a direct line of fire. Officer Michael K. McCleese, who was operating a cruising patrol, placed his vehicle between the suspect's house and Officer Martin. This allowed Officers William M. Downing and John R. Draa to approach the fallen officer safely. Officer Martin was placed in the cruising patrol and rushed to Church Home and Hospital. A Command Post was established and efforts were made to convince the suspect to surrender. The suspect released two women who were in the house but refused to surrender himself. The Emergency Vehicle Unit responded to the scene and after it had been determined that further negotiations would not be successful, tear gas was fired into the house, forcing the suspect to surrender. A search of the house revealed a number of empty 30/30 caliber cartridge casings in various locations throughout the building and a supply of 30/30 caliber ammunition. Found in the kitchen was the suspect's 30/30 caliber rifle. Officer Martin was admitted to Church Home and Hospital suffering gunshot wounds to the right shoulder and upper chest. The single projectile apparently split upon striking the windshield of his vehicle causing both of his wounds.

 

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Officer James BrennanOfficer Arthur Kennell Jr.Officer Neal SplainOfficer Calvin Mencken JrOfficer Ronald Miller

 

Officer Jimmy D. Halcomb Slain 5 Officers Shot & Wounded April 16, 1976 It was Good Friday in Baltimore. Worshipers, many of them, had returned not too many hours before from afternoon worship services. Others, cleaning up the dinner dishes, were preparing to attend evening services. Many persons were participating in the Passover observances. Still others had spent the ninety degree afternoon in bars, were tilting beer cans on the front steps seeking relief from the steaming temperatures. It wouldn't be accurate to say that it was just a normal April friday. It was too hot, more like July than springtime. It was much too hot.' The sun was crimson as it settled over the Western part of the city. Storefronts, church steeples and rows of houses created shadows which lengthened quickly. It was getting cooler. Officers were patrolling the streets, appreciative of the relief that the quickening darkness would provide. It wasn't really getting busy yet, not for a Friday night. Then the bullets began pouring out of the 1300 block West Lombard Street. The darkness became heavy. A volley from a high powered rifle sent bullets ricocheting along Lombard Street. Another burst and shells wined north on Carey Street. Officers from the Southern, Southwestern and Western Districts responded as did the Quick Response Teams of the Tactical Section. In the military the incident would have been termed a fire-fight. But for the police and citizens, who sought protection and cover it was unreal. It took forty five minutes for the situation to be resolved. The suspect, an 18' year old male, surrendered to officers after telephoning his intentions to the Communications Division of the Department. It became quiet again and the neighbors returned to their front steps. Stories of what had happened were interspersed with personal perspectives. "Where were you when it started?" The press, which had shown part of the incident live to the rest of the state, asked questions. Neighborhood residents appeared on television, they knew what had happened . . . they saw it all. For police there began the laborious task of reconstructing the incident which left one of their brothers mortally wounded, five others sustaining gunshot wounds. Evidence was collected, photographs made, statements prepared. This process would continue for a long time. At University Hospital medical specialists quickly administered to the injured. Families arrived, some relieved that their loved ones were not injured. Others heard the dreaded news. Shock, emotion and grief were real. It affected everyone. Officer Jimmy D. Halcomb was 31 years old. Assigned to the Operations Unit of the Western District he had been one of the first to arrive at the scene. The sniper fired a round which penetrated the automobile Officer Halcomb was using for cover. He lost consciousness immediately and seconds later he was gone   Officer James Brennan Twenty-five year old Officer James A. Brennan of the Western District was crouching behind a van a few feet south on Carey Street. He went down, seriously wounded. The other officers behind the van made him as comfortable as possible   Officer Arthur Kennell,Jr. Officers Neal C. Splain, 28, Officer Calvin R. Mencken, 33, and Officer Arthur E. Kennell, Jr. 27, all of the Southern District were hit by a shotgun blast which came from the rear of the building. A civilian was also wounded   Officer Neal Splain   Officer Calvin Mencken, Jr. Officer Halcomb's funeral, on April 20, was attended by hundreds of officers from more than fifty police jurisdictions. His family, scores of friends and neighbors heard the words of hope and consolation spoken from the altar. The distance to the cemetery was short but the walk was long. At the conclusion of the brief ceremonies they gave Mrs. Angela Halcomb the American Flag and we said goodbye to a brave officer.   Officer Roland Miller Officer Roland W. Miller, 23 of the Western District, who was beside Officer Brennan sustained a minor wound in the left arm. They were to wait long minutes for relief.  

 

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Officer Thomas Gaither

 

City Hall Incident April 13, 1976 During the lunch hour Baltimore's City Hall, like many major offices, undergoes a change. Although the level of activity is barely diminished many of those who work in the building are either coming or going from a lunch break, are out of the building enjoying the noon meal or are filling in while someone takes a break. That's the way it was on Tuesday, April 13, 1976 when a man got off the elevator on the 7th floor of the temporary City Hall in the 100 block East Redwood Street demanding to see the Mayor. A short time after the initial contact with the receptionist this man was spreading terror through the two adjoining buildings which are housing City Government while City Hall is being remodeled.   Officer Thomas Gaither Within a few minutes an aide to the Mayor was shot and seriously injured, one City Councilman was fatally wounded, a second councilman taken hostage and also seriously wounded and a Baltimore Police Officer was down with a serious leg injury. Those moments brought into sharp focus some of the most serious problems confronting cities and governments in the '70's. Baltimore City Councilman Dominic Leone died as the result of a single gunshot wound. Councilman Carroll Fitzgerald and Miss Kathleen Nolan, the Mayor's aide, are recovering from gunshot wounds which caused massive serious injury. Baltimore Police Officer Thomas Gaither continues to recover from a leg wound sustained while the suspect was being apprehended. The suspect, 34 year old Charles A. Hopkins is also recovering from gunshot wounds. Moments after the initial call for assistance to City Hall members of the department had apprehended the suspect, searched and secured both buildings. Thousands of downtown employees milled about at the scene, the tragic curious trying to witness history being made. Members of the Traffic Division stood by keeping the area accessible to ambulances and other officers. That the suspect was apprehended while still in the act of attempting to get to the Mayor and before he could accomplish this phase of his bizarre mission, is a tribute to the members of the Department who responded quickly and took command of the situation. This feeling is reflected in the communication, received by the Police Commissioner, and reprinted below: Dear Commissioner Pomerleau: In reflecting on the tragic events of Tuesday and sorting out the things that happened, one of the things which is now most apparent to me is the exceptional police response and handling of the entire matter. Surely no one could have foreseen and thus prevented what happened, but when the first frantic call for help was issued from my office, I deeply believe that it was immediate police response which kept more persons from being injured. Many officers entered the building rapidly, with no thought of personal risk, knowing fully that a dangerous gunman was loose somewhere in the building. Despite inferences to the contrary in some news reports, the police response to our plea for help was exceptional. Please let your men know that those of us who were here at the time of the shootings are extremely grateful for their quick and efficient action. Sincerely, William Donald Schaefer Mayor

 

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Officer John Swiec 

Southern District Officer Shot April 1976   Officer John Swiec Officer John A. Swiec, Southern District, received a minor gunshot wound to the left shoulder when he recently aborted the hold-up of a service station in the Southern District. During the hold-up attempt one of the suspects was mortally wounded by the officer but not before his coat was partially blown away by the suspect's shotgun. Two other suspects were arrested hours later

 

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Detective Ernell Thornton

 Detective Ernell Thornton

Off Duty Detective Shot September 1976   Detective Ernell C. Thornton, Property Crimes Section, was shot four times on September 22, 1976 while off-duty in the 1700 block Pressman Street. The suspect was quickly apprehended and charged. The nine year veteran with the Department is recovering from his wounds in an area hospital

 

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Officer Charles Mitchell

 Officer Charles Mitchell

Officer Mitchell Wounded October 1976   Officer Charles Mitchell It was obvious who the disorderly man was when Officer Charles E. Mitchell, Western District, pulled up to the 1300 block North Fremont Avenue, responding to a call from Communications. As he approached with Officer Paul B. Oros a citizen signaled that the 21 year old suspect had a gun. Officer Mitchell informed his back-up unit, then ordered the disorderly man to get against the wall. The suspect refused and as he turned toward the officers he drew a .38 caliber revolver and shot Officer Mitchell. Both officers returned fire and as the gunman fell, Officer Oros aided the wounded officer to cover, called for assistance over his walkie-talkie and immediately began administering first aid. Back-up units and two ambulances responded quickly and both the officer and the wounded gunman were rushed to an area hospital. The suspect later died as a result of his wounds. Officer Mitchell, a nine year veteran of the Department, is recuperating from a gun shot wound that struck him below the left eye and exited near his lower left Jaw. Investigation by Homicide Detectives revealed that the suspect, later identified as Bernard Warfield, was involved in a dispute with his girl-friend who refused to let him into the house or come out and talk to him.

 

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Two Eastern District Officers Stabbed
9 September. 1977

Officer EdwardO Byrne JrTwo Eastern District Officers Stabbed September 9, 1977   Officer Edward O'Byrne, Jr. The evening of September 9th had been routine when Officers Kirby R. Croft and Edward P. O'Byrne, Jr., Eastern District, received a call to meet a Northern District Unit. The officer had a disturbing the peace warrant for a 38 year old male, which had been obtained by his sister. She said that her brother, recently released from a mental institution, was acting strangely. The officers went to the house and an additional unit was assigned to watch the rear entrance. They were let in by the suspect's grandmother who said that he was asleep. The officers went up the stairs and were lead down the dark hallway by the suspect's sister who called for her brother and opened the door. The suspect came out swinging with a 9" folding knife which had a 4" blade. Surprising the officers he was able to stab both before they could subdue him or call for additional help. He first stabbed Officer Croft in the lower abdomen causing him to fall and then wheeled around and stabbed Officer O'Byrne several times. Although injured, both officers were able to disarm the suspect, subdue him and call for assistance. Once he was under control and adequate back-up units arrived, both officers were transported to an area hospital.   Officer Kirby Croft Officer Croft was admitted for treatment of the stab wound of the abdomen and was released two days later. Officer O'Byrne was treated for stab wounds to the chin, the left elbow, the right hand, the right side and an injury to his right hand and was then released from the hospital. A later examination of Officer Edward O'Byrne's clothing told a more chilling story than the incident itself. There was a 1/2 inch wide hole in the officer's right fronOfficer Kirby Croftt shirt pocket and inside the pocket was Officer O'Byrne's J.D. carrying case which had been cut half-way through. The knife though, did not penetrate through the case nor the soft body armor the officer was wearing nor did he receive injury as a result of the thrust. Another hole was on the right side of the shirt about 5 inches from the shirt pocket hole. The same area of the soft body armor showed a puncture as did the officer's undershirt. The officer received a slight puncture wound as a result of this thrust. A third hole was discovered through the shirt in the upper stomach area. Examination of the soft body armor revealed that this thrust had only penetrated half way through and there was no injury as a result. Both officers agree that the suspect must have heard them come in and was waiting for them to come to the bedroom. The incident took only a few seconds in the dark hallway and Officer O'Byrne didn't even realize he was stabbed until they had disarmed and subdued the suspect. Officer O'Byrne believes that had it not been for his ID. case and the soft body armor his injuries would have been more disabling if not fatal. Experts in the field of blunt trauma agree that the force used to penetrate the Department's soft body armor would be disabling if not fatal to an individual not wearing it

 

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Officer Frank Lorah

Officer Frank Lorah 

Off Duty Officer Stabbed October 23, 1977   Officer Frank Lorah While all-duty on October 23, 1977, and out with some friends, Officer Frank J. Lorah, Central District, came upon a large altercation as he was exiting a club in South Baltimore. He attempted to break up one of the fights and three of the combatants turned on him. During the fracas they disarmed the officer and one of the suspects stabbed him. Southern District Units responded, gained quick control of the situation and rushed Officer Lorah to an area hospital. The 27 year old Officer was cut on the left cheek, stabbed in the right elbow and received a serious stab wound of the upper left abdomen. The suspects were arrested and charged and the officer's gun was picked up by an alert citizen who hid it until the arrival of other units. Officer Lorah at last report is recovering from his wound at South Baltimore General Hospital.

 

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Agent Andrew Leso

 Agent Andrew Leso

Eastern District Agent Shot November 14, 1977   Agent Andrew Leso Shortly before 9:00 p.m., on November 14, 1977, Police Agent Andrew Leso of the Eastern District was patrolling in the 2000 block of Harford Road. He had conducted several field interviews on the street and was returning to his patrol car when he saw a man in his early 20's who he had arrested previously. Agent Leso recalled that this suspect's name had been read out at roll call several days earlier as an escapee. Agent Leso approached the suspect, called for a patrol wagon and attempted to place the suspect against a wall so that he could be searched as part of the process of arrest. The suspect resisted, turning toward the officer and at the same time placing a handgun, which he had concealed in his belt, against the officer's side. In the ensuing struggle for possession of the suspect's weapon both Agent Leso and the assailant were knocked to the street. The suspect at one point pulled back aiming his weapon at Agent Leso's head, threatening to shoot if the officer moved. At the same time the suspect reached for the officer's still holstered weapon. Once again Agent Leso attempted to gain possession of his assailant's weapon when the suspect moved back slightly and fired point blank at the officer who was lying on his back in the street. The bullet struck Agent Leso's soft body armor, near the collar bone. The suspect immediately retreated through a three foot wide alley-way which runs parallel to 20th Street from the 2000 block Harford Road. Agent Leso was able, because of the protection offered by the soft body armor, to pursue the assailant returning the fire. Officers responding to the shooting scene found Agent Leso standing next to his patrol vehicle. A description, including the name and age of the assailant was broadcast, and the victim was taken to the emergency room at Johns Hopkins Hospital a short distance away. Doctors examining the wound found what amounted to a very serious bruise, a result of the blunt trauma of the projectile hitting the protective soft body armor. Doctors say that without the protection of the soft body armor the wound could very well have been fatal. Instead, after spending the night at the hospital, Agent Leso was released 12 hours later. Crime laboratory technicians recovered the .32 caliber bullet from the soft body armor. It had not penetrated the protective fabric. A little more than an hour after the shooting incident officers arrested a 23 year old escapee from a Maryland Correctional Institution on the street not far from where the shooting occurred. He was arrested without incident and was charged with assault with intent to murder Police Agent Leso. Additional handgun violation charges were also placed against the suspect. Commissioner Donald D. Pomerleau provided the soft body armor to all members of the Department after supervising its development late in 1975. The protective fabric was first developed by the DuPont Corporation to replace steel in radial tires. It was incorporated in the soft body armor, which was developed to specifications after intensive field testing by the Department and experts from Edgewood Arsenal in Harford County. Soft body armor is not a "bullet proof vest." It is instead a lightweight garment which is designed to minimize the impact of projectiles from weapons which are commonly found in the urban area. Although the wearer is most often protected from the damages which can be inflicted by a bullet penetrating his skin, he still runs the risk of serious injury as the result of the blunt trauma or impact of the projectile against the soft body armor

 

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Officer Joseph Wolfe

  Officer Joseph Wolfe

Northeastern District Officer Wounded February 4, 1978   Officer Joseph Wolfe Three women who were enroute to a birthday party in the Northeastern District were terrorized by two men on the evening of February 4, 1978. As the ladies parked their car at their destination in the 3100 block of Weaver Avenue the suspects approached their vehicle displayed a handgun and robbed the occupants of $51.00. After shouting instructions to leave the keys in the ignition the suspects attempted to force the victims from their automobile. One suspect looked inside and shouted to the second that the keys were not there. The second suspect then chased and tackled the woman who had the keys in her possession. The suspects fled, without the car, when another of the victims sounded the horn as the woman who had been wrestled to the ground shouted for assistance. Northeastern District officers quickly obtained and disseminated a description of the suspects, both 20 years of age. Officer Joseph E. Wolfe, 24, was patrolling in the vicinity of Herring Run Park and noted the description as it was broadcast by police radio. As he cruised the area he saw a suspect matching one of the descriptions which had been broadcast about 15 minutes earlier. He parked his radio car at Argonne Drive and Harford Road and waited for the suspect to walk by. As the suspect approached, Officer Wolfe got out of the car and ordered him to stop. At this point the young man turned and fired three shots at the Officer. Although one of the shots struck Officer Wolfe in the right forearm he returned the fire, then chased the suspect for about a block. The suspect was apprehended while he was trying to stop a passing vehicle. Police Officers transported the wounded Officer to Union Memorial Hospital for emergency treatment. He was admitted and held for several days of treatment and observation. The second suspect was also apprehended by Northeastern District Officers who responded to a call from the Department's Helicopter which had been searching the area. The Aerial Observer gave the officers on the ground directions to seek out a man who was hiding behind a tree in the 3900 block of Harford Road. This suspect was apprehended without further incident. The suspects were subsequently charged with Assault, Robbery, Attempted Murder and other counts related to several armed robbery attempts in the Northeastern District that evening. A 32 caliber revolver was recovered at Harford Road and Argonne Drive.

 

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Agent Lawrence Bennett

 Agent Lawrence Bennett

Police Agent Lawrence B. Bennett Seriously Wounded March 1978   Agent Lawrence Bennett Shortly before 4:00 o'clock last Thursday morning, Police Agent Lawrence B. Bennett of the Northern District pulled an automobile over in the 4900 block of Greenspring Avenue for a car check. A few minutes later Police Agent Bennett radioed his dispatcher requesting a Signal 13. He calmly requested an ambulance reporting to the dispatcher that he'd been shot. Even though seriously wounded Agent Bennett was able to broadcast the route of escape used by the two assailants. Northern District Officers who responded to the 4900 block of Greenspring Avenue found Agent Bennett lying face down in the middle of the street. He had been shot in the back. Agent Bennett, still conscious but not able to move, told officers that he had the. assailant's driver's license and registration card in his hand. (The license and registration, in fact, belonged to a third party not directly involved in the incident.) A Baltimore City Fire Department Ambulance transported Agent Bennett to Sinai Hospital where he is under treatment for the gunshot wound. Investigation revealed that a 63 year old West Baltimore man had stopped his automobile in traffic at Mosher and Fulton Avenues shortly before 10:00 o'clock the night before, when two men forced their way into his vehicle at gunpoint. He was forced to drive into an alley and was then prodded, at gunpoint, into the trunk of his own vehicle. The assailants then apparently drove randomly for about an hour before firing three shots into the closed trunk. The vehicle's owner sustained a gunshot wound of the left hand. The suspects then drove for approximately six hours until they encountered Police Agent Bennett in the 3800 block of Greenspring Avenue. Officers from the Northern District immediately began a search for the suspects wanted for the shooting and abduction. Slightly more than an hour after the shooting occurred Officer Richard Lear of the Northern District saw a male subject edging out of the wooded area at Northern Parkway and the Jones Falls Expressway. The suspect's clothing was partially mud-covered. He fit the description of one of the assailants which had been given police by the victim of the abduction the night before. A search for the second suspect continued with Police Officers in all districts receiving a description and a nickname of the person thought to be the second assailant. Shortly after 5 :00 a.m. a Western District Police Agent received a report from a 45 year old taxi cab operator who related that he had picked up a fare at Fulton Avenue and Reisterstown Road and taken him to the 700 block of McKean Avenue. According to the driver the fare then got out of the vehicle, produced a small caliber handgun and announced a robbery. The victim turned over $5.00 in currency and at the same time he alertly grabbed the suspect's gun and stepped on the accelerator causing the vehicle to lurch forward at the moment the assailant discharged his weapon. The projectile narrowly missed the victim and smashed his vehicle's front windshield. The taxicab driver was not injured. After receiving a description of the assailant in the hold-up and noticing the similarity in the description to those given after Agent Bennett was shot, a description was broadcast which linked the two incidents. Police from the Homicide Unit and the Western District then began an intensive search in the Western District for the wanted assailant. Police searched, without success for nearly five hours before arriving at a residence which is located in the 700 block of North Monroe Street. After receiving information to the effect that the wanted person was inside the residence officers entered and arrested the suspect without further incident. Detectives investigated both subjects thoroughly and with the advice of the Violent Crimes Liaison Unit of the State's Attorney's Office placed the following charges against the suspects: # 1 Two counts assault with intent to murder One count of armed robbery One count of kidnapping Two counts of possession of a handgun Two counts of using a handgun in the commission of a felony #2 Three counts of assault with intent to murder Two counts of armed robbery One count of kidnapping Three counts of possession of a handgun Three counts of using a handgun in the commission of a felony Both suspects are incarcerated awaiting adjudication of the charges which have been lodged against them.

 

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Officer Wardell James

 Officer Wardell James

Officer Wardell James Seriously Wounded September 7, 1978   Officer Wardell James Shortly after midnight on the morning of September 7, 1978, the routine radio traffic of the Baltimore Police Department's Communications System was interrupted by an urgent call for assistance by Officer Wardell James of the Northeastern District. He had been shot, he said, and needed an ambulance. Officer James was found lying in the 5200 block of Parkside Drive, shot twice in the right side. Officers quickly obtained a description of the suspect and this was broadcast to all units immediately. Tactical Section Sergeants Richard J. Ellwood, Jr. was responding to the area when he noticed the suspect, who had just been described, operating a motorcycle at a high rate of speed westbound on Moravia Road. As he began to pursue the suspect he notified Communications of the manner and direction of the escape. In the 2400 block of East Coldspring Lane, the suspect lost control of his motorcycle and it overturned throwing him to the ground. At this time he lost possession of his .38 caliber automatic. Sergeant Ellwood pursued the suspect on foot to the rear of the 2400 block of East Coldspring Lane, and lost sight of him. Officer D. K. Ossmus of the Northeastern District, responding as the result of Sergeant Ellwood's communications on the direction of travel of the fleeing suspect was stopped by a distraught citizen who told him that a man fitting the suspect's description had just taken his automobile from him at gun point. The citizen accompanied Officer Ossmus and at Gilray Drive and Southern Avenue they recovered the stolen automobile which was parked at the curb. At this point Ossmus spotted the suspect as he forced another citizen at gunpoint out of a van parked on East side of Gilray Drive. As Officer Ossmus gave chase the van accelerated at a rapid rate. Keeping his radio dispatcher informed of the changing routes of the suspect's vehicle Officer Ossmus gave other responding police units the opportunity to establish a roadblock at the intersection of Roland Avenue and Northern Parkway. The suspect approached the police roadblock at a high rate of speed and in an attempt to drive around the stationary police vehicles he lost control and collided with a utility pole. Officers who had established the road block took him into custody as he attempted to leave the van. At this time Officer James' service revolver was recovered. At Parkside Drive and Sinclair Lane a man told Officers who were assisting the wounded Officer James that he had been the victim of a kidnapping and that he knew the identities of two of three of the assailants. He said that when the vehicle, in which he was being held at gunpoint stopped at the intersection he observe a Officer James with a stopped civilian vehicle on Sinclair Lane. Fearing for his life the kidnap victim had escaped from the vehicle and called for the Officer to assist him. Officer James immediately ran across two lanes of Sinclair Lane and encountered the suspect who produced an automatic weapon. A brief struggle followed in which the suspect wrested the service revolver from Officer James. Two shots were fired and Officer James fell to the roadway, critically wounded. The suspect fled to a nearby apartment complex, where he obtained the motorcycle to be used in the attempted escape. The suspect, 25 year old Sherman W. Dobson of Baltimore, was charged with Assault with Intent to Murder Officer James, Kidnapping, three Armed Assault and Robberies and numerous handgun violations. He is presently awaiting trial. Officer James was taken to Baltimore City Hospitals where he underwent several hours of emergency surgery to repair the damage caused by the two bullets which had been fired into him at point blank range. He is presently under intensive medical supervision as he recovers from his wounds

 

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Traffic Officer Hurt in Presidential Motorcade October 1978   Officer Earl Carter

 

Officer Earl Carter

 

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Officer Michael Dunn

Officer Michael Dunn 

It Did The Job! April 7, 1979   Officer Michael Dunn When a Police Officer gets shot in the line of duty all of us are saddened. Recuperation from gunshot wounds is a long, slow and often painful process. There are occasions, however, when such an incident has a brighter than expected ending. Officer Michael P. Dunn of the Southern District was shot three times during what began as a traffic violation stop on April 7, 1979. When he stopped a van that Saturday night he had little way of knowing how close death would be in just a moment or two. The van was occupied by three people, the driver and two young women, who were being held against their wills; He had kidnapped and raped them earlier in the evening. Officer Dunn, of course, was unaware of this when he stopped the vehicle. Just twelve days after his harrowing experience Officer Dunn visited the NEWSLETTER Office and talked about what had happened to him. In the following excerpts from that Interview he offers a unique perspective on what was nearly a personal disaster: "I just finished backing a unit up on Reedbird Ave. and went down to Reedbird and Hanover to finish the run sheet for the night. I finished and pulled onto Hanover St. to go into the Station when I spotted a black van with no tail lights or tag light. I pulled him over in about the 2700 block of South Hanover St. "I approached the van and requested his driver license and registration. He took them out of his wallet and I advised him that his tail lights were out and he said that he knew because the fuse blew that day. While I was talking to him I heard a low scream coming from the back of the van and 1 didn't think too much of it. I figured that they were playing in the van. "As I was looking at his registration I heard this terrifying scream and as soon as I heard that I said to myself, OK . . . just be calm and don't make any jerky moves. I looked back toward him and there's a gun pointing at my head. I put my hands into the air because I knew that I had no chance for my gun. He said, 'let me have it', it dawned on me that he wanted his license back because it had his picture on it. "As soon as I gave it to him he shot me almost dead center in the chest. (I was) no more than three or four feet away from him. The first shot threw me back and spun me around and I then got it in the left arm and in the left leg.". . . I remember the hit in the chest and the next thing I knew I was down on the ground. If there was any pain in the chest from that I really can't say because my mind was on what to do, what to remember and the things I was hearing from the opposite side of the van. ". . . When the other units got there I was conscious (and) they asked me where I was shot. As soon as I said that I was hit in the chest one guy said, 'Did you have the vest on?' and I said, 'Yes, I think it did the job because I don't feel any pain and no blood running down the chest!' ". . . (In the hospital) I helped them take the vest off because I was anxious to see if it did the job. When I saw just the bruise and just some skin that was more or less cut, I'm yelling, 'It really works! It really works! It did the job!'   The bullet which struck Officer Dunn in the chest passed through his necktie before striking his soft body armor. The bullet is shown just above the impact paints which are marked with arrows "Lieutenant (James L.) Rainey was looking in the door and I told him to go back to Roll Call and tell the men that it 'really works. If I could have gotten up I probably would have been jumping up down for joy. ". . . A lot of men really want to know, does it really work? It's so flimsy and all . . . I found out the hard way. If it wasn't for the vest, I wouldn't be sitting here now. It definitely saved my life. "The vest definitely works. I'll still complain about it being hot, but I'm still going to wear it." After Officer Dunn was shot he was able to broadcast a description of his assailant. A short time later Southern District Officer Samuel Ritch, Jr. saw the fleeing van and placed his patrol vehicle in a position to block the roadway. The suspect's vehicle rammed the Police unit and then spun into a privately owned vehicle. The suspect was captured and was later charged with multiple assaults intent to murder, rape, kidnapping and handgun violations. Officer Dunn is recovering quickly from his injuries and will return to duty in the very near future.


Officer Michael Dunn vest

 

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Officer David Garayoa

Officer David Garayoa 

Police Officer Wounded August 30, 1979,  Officer David S. Garayoa, Southern District, was wounded on August 30, 1979 during a bizarre incident which still remains a mystery. Officer Garayoa, a six year veteran, was walking his foot post and had just completed a business check of a food market in the 900 block of East Patapsco Avenue. He walked from the store to the rear loading dock of the building where he intended to check the parking lot. While in the parking lot he heard what sounded like breaking glass and immediately felt a stinging sensation in his left forearm. He grabbed his arm and turned to his right looking in the direction of the noise. Officer Garayoa looked at his bleeding left arm and realized that he had been shot. He notified his communications dispatcher that he was shot and requested assistance. A unit quickly arrived and transported the injured officer to a nearby hospital. At the hospital, a .44 calibre magnum projectile, probably fired from a rifle, was removed from the officer's arm and examined by a technician from the Laboratory Division's Firearms Unit. As a result of the projectile examination and the circumstances surrounding the incident it is felt that the shooting of Officer Garayoa was not a deliberate shooting, but apparently a stray shot fired from a great distance. This opinion is based upon a number of factors; the relatively minor injury to Officer Garayoa and the non-mutilated condition of the projectile. An unobstructed shot from a .44 calibre rifle has an effective range of 400 to 500 yards. From within this effective range the injury to Officer Garayoa's arm would have been extensive. Total disintegration of the projectile would have almost been a certainty. The trajectory of the projectile was in a downward angle. This would indicate that the shot was apparently fired outside the effective range and apparently at an upward angle. A .44 calibre rifle, being a high powered hunting rifle, has an extremely loud report. The officer and three witnesses, however, reported that the only noise heard was a sound similar to breaking glass.

 

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Officer Michael Cassizzi

Officer Michael Cassizzi 

Eastern District Officer Wounded October 19, 1979,  Officer Michael J. Cassizzi, Eastern District, was wounded on October 19, 1979 during an incident which ended with the suicide of his assailant. The events surrounding the shooting of Officer Cassizzi, a four year veteran, began hours earlier. A relative of the suspect talked with doctors seeking help for his foster brother who was apparently mentally ill. After the doctor spoke with the suspect he advised the relative to obtain emergency commitment papers from a judge for his foster brother. The Court Order was obtained and presented to officers at the Eastern District who were assured that the suspect had no weapons. Officers went to the residence of the suspect to serve the commitment papers and again met the foster brother who told them that the suspect was in the basement. The officers, including Officer Cassizzi, examined the basement with negative results. The officers were then informed that the suspect was probably in a second floor bathroom. They went to the area, found the door locked and a light on inside. The officers asked the suspect several times to unlock the door, but he refused each time. When Officer Leonard Petrovich forced the door open the light went out and gun shots erupted from the room. The officers retreated to the first floor under a rain of bullets. During the retreat; Officer Cassizzi was shot. Officer Cassizzi was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment of a gun shot wound in the lower back. It was later learned that Officer Petrovich's portable radio had been struck by a bullet. A command post was established and attempt» were made to establish communication with the suspect. There was never a reply. Chemical agents were used several times in an attempt to force the suspect from the residence. Quick Response Team members then saw the suspect lying in a hallway. He had taken his own life.

 

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Officer William Surratt

Officer William Surratt 

Officer Spared Serious Injury November 24, 1979   Officer William Surratt Shootings of Baltimore Police Officers continue. The latest incident involved Officer William R. Surratt, a 21 year veteran assigned to the Western District. Officer Surratt is the eighth officer to be shot this year and the fifth within the past three months. Although eight unlawful police shootings in the past eight months is alarming it does not equal the twelve officers injured by gunshot in 1976. Officer Surratt sustained a gunshot wound to his abdomen. Officer Surratt is at home recovering from a relatively minor laceration. He was spared serious injury or death by soft body armour provided by the Department. This is the second time this year that an officer has been spared the ordeal of a serious gunshot wound by his protective body armour. On November 24, 1979, Officer Surratt, while working as an Officer-in-Charge, heard gunshots in a tavern in the 2100 block of W. North Avenue. Officer Surratt had no way of knowing that a few moments before, a suspect had entered the tavern, brandished a .38 calibre revolver and shot a victim four times. The apparent drug related incident proved fatal to the victim. Seeing a person walking from the tavern, Officer Surratt left his patrol vehicle and ordered the suspect, who was reaching into his waistband, to stop. The officer drew his service revolver and commanded the suspect to stop for a second and third time. At this the gunman stopped walking, turned completely and fired a shot at Officer Surratt striking him in the left side. Officer Surratt stumbled forward momentarily and returned fire. The suspect, struck in the right buttock, was knocked to the sidewalk. The officer, having absorbed the impact of the suspect's bullet, was still able to approach, disarm and arrest the suspect. Officers responding to the Signal 13 called by Officer Surratt found him standing in the middle of the block along side his prisoner. Officer Surratt was transported to a nearby hospital where he was admitted in good condition for a blunt trauma laceration to his abdomen. He was released a few days later and is now recuperating at home. The suspect was also taken to a near by hospital in good condition. He has been charged with homicide, assault by shooting with intent to murder and appropriate handgun violations.

 

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Officer Thomas Lewis

  Officer Thomas Lewis

Northwestern District Officer Wounded February 19, 1980   Officer Thomas Lewis Most persons who are skilled law enforcement professionals would agree that much of the work which is accomplished on "normal patrol" could be described as "routine". They will also agree that the distance between tedium and survival is often very slight. It started that way for Officer Thomas H. Lewis of the Northwestern District as he began his tour of duty on February 19, 1980. That Tuesday morning wasn't even 15 minutes old when the Officer was stopped by a young man in the 2700 block of Hilton Street. He told the Officer that his younger brother, about a half block away, had a handgun. Officer Lewis confronted the suspect who assaulted him with a portable radio, then pulled a concealed 22 calibre handgun. The exchange of gunfire left the suspect seriously wounded. The Police Officer's "soft body armour" stopped what could have been two fatal wounds of the chest and abdomen. A third bullet chewed through his left arm. He radioed for assistance and when additional Officers arrived they found him still guarding the seriously wounded assailant. Both were taken to nearby hospitals. Officer Lewis was treated, released and is presently recuperating satisfactorily. His adversary was transferred to a shock trauma unit for treatment of massive injuries. Soft body armour has, on numerous occasions, saved the lives of Officers of the Baltimore Police Department. The addition of the "garment" to the "official wardrobe" of a Police Officer in 1976 was greeted with some trepidation by several members of the Department. Its effectiveness, however, has made it as desirable a piece of wearing apparel as a good pair of shoes. You wouldn't go out without your shoes on, would you?

 

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Officer Michael Herpel

 Officer Michael Herpel

Unusual Accident Injures Officer February 27, 1980   Officer Michael Herpel During the past year, more than 44,000 traffic accidents were investigated by police in Baltimore City. Fortunately, the over-whelming majority of these accidents are of a minor nature. For most officers, a traffic accident investigation is routine. Some officers have probably investigated hundreds of accidents during the course of their careers. On February 27, 1980, Officer Michael Herpel's radio dispatcher sent him to the intersection of Washington Boulevard and Monroe Street for an accident. A dump truck had struck a utility pole. At the accident site he met Officer Richard Palmisano. They had a mess to take care of. As the result of the accident, two large traffic signals were lying in the intersection still attached to their cables which were also lying across the roadway. An intensive traffic tie-up had developed as vehicles attempted to slowly cross the cables. Officer Herpel notified authorities of the damaged traffic light as he and Officer Palmisano began to direct traffic, side by side, in the center of the intersection. The officers were directing traffic across the cables when a truck entered the intersection. As the truck slowly crossed the cable, the rear wheels became entangled with the wires stretching the cables. The truck operator, apparently unaware of what was happening proceeded on, stretching the cable until it snapped. Two traffic signals, which were still suspended, hurtled into the intersection as if hurled by a giant rubber band. One of the stoplights struck Officer Herpel directly in the upper chest causing him to fall back into the arms of Officer Palmisano. Officer Herpel was seriously injured. Officer Palmisano called for assistance and began to render first aid. At the University of Maryland Hospital it was determined that Officer Herpel sustained a broken neck and bruised spinal cord. While undergoing treatment Officer Herpel's soft body armour was removed. Once again, this light weight fabric vest had saved a life. According to one of the attending physicians at the hospital, Herpel's soft body armour saved his life. It has been estimated that the stop light hit the officer with about 1,000 lbs. of force. Rather than absorb this impact in a small area of the chest, the officer's "vest" dissipated the energy of the blow over a wider portion of his body. Officer Herpel has undergone surgery. He has progressed satisfactorily enough to be removed from the intensive care unit of the hospital. Officer Herpel continues to show progress in what will be a long recovery period

 

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Officer Charles Benjamin

Officer Charles Benjamin 

Eastern District Officer Wounded During Ambush March 25, 1980   Officer Charles Benjamin Police Officer Charles H. Benjamin, Eastern District, was wounded on Friday, March 25, 1980 during an apparent ambush. At about 8:30 that evening, Officer Benjamin was on Sinclair Lane. As he approached Homestead Street he was flagged down by a citizen. This simple stop, which has occurred thousands of times was the beginning of a nightmarish few minutes for the officer. Officer Benjamin brought his vehicle to a stop in a nearby parking lot as the person came nearer. Suddenly the person pointed a cloth bag which covered his hand and demanded the officer's portable radio and service revolver. Reacting instinctively Officer Benjamin grabbed his assailant's arm and pulled him partially into his radio car. Gunfire erupted from the bag. Officer Benjamin drew his service revolver which the suspect tried to grab with his free hand. In the struggle the weapon discharged. The suspect wrested free of the officer's grasp, backed away and fired several more times at the officer. The gunfire ended, Officer Benjamin sat in his vehicle, shot in the right hand and upper right thigh. The bizarre incident wasn't over. As he sat wounded he saw an automobile moving in a Westbound direction on Sinclair Lane from the direction of Belair Road. The interior and exterior lighting of this vehicle had been turned off as it cruised toward the shooting scene. As the car drew abreast of Officer Benjamin it stopped, the suspect got in, and it again drove in a Westbound direction. Officer Benjamin drove his vehicle across the street and called for help. Responding officers quickly applied first aid and rushed the stricken officer to a nearby hospital. While in route to the hospital Officer Benjamin gave a description of his assailant which was immediately broadcast to fellow officers throughout the city. Although an intensive search was conducted, the suspects were not found. Officer Benjamin underwent emergency surgery. The following day he was able to assist an artist to draw a likeness of the man who shot him. WANTED   WANTED FOR ATTEMPT MURDER OF A POLICE OFFICER Wanted far the shooting of Officer Charles H. Benjamin, Eastern District, is a black male, 5/11 - 6 ft. 180 lbs., muscular build, short close cropped hair, pencil thin mustache, very light skin, very light hair on chin as if growing a beard, spoke with West Indies or Jamaican accent, wearing a green army fatigue combat jacket with draw strings at the bottom buttoned up to the neck, wearing black or blue dress pants. This suspect is armed with a .38 caliber revolver which was concealed in a cloth or canvas bag. Suspect was seen entering a 1969 Dodge Charger, red or burnt orange in color, dark vinyl top, false louvers in the door, the rear of this automobile was slightly elevated, dark license plates, registration undetermined. This vehicle had shiny hubcaps or possible mag wheels, raised white lettering on the sidewalls of the rear tires. Anyone having any information concerning the identity of the above suspect should contact the Homicide Unit at 396-2721.

 

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Officer Ralph Greaves Jr

 Officer Ralph E. Greaves

Officer Greaves Ambushed July 17, 1980 For the fourth time this year a Police Officer was recently wounded on duty. Fortunately none of these shootings have inflicted serious injury due to the soft body armour the officers wear. In an incident earlier this year an officer's soft body armour stopped what could have been two fatal bullet wounds of the chest and abdomen   Officer Ralph E. Greaves, Jr Southwestern District Officer Ralph E. Greaves, Jr. was undertaking routine patrol shortly after midnight on July 17. He received a call, from the communications dispatcher, that a man with a gun was standing in the 1300 block of Bloomingdale Road. He arrived at the given address, which houses a tavern, and immediately saw, among a group of male suspects, a man carrying a rolled up blue towel. As Officer Greaves approached the suspect the towel was dropped to the pavement and the handgun rolled out. Officer Greaves immediately began the process of placing the young man under arrest, after recovering the weapon. As this was going the Officer heard several gunshots being fired behind him and he immediately felt the sting of two projectiles as they tore into his right shoulder and left. forearm. He turned and returned fire. The 23 year old suspect fell to the ground, then got up and began running as additional Officers arrived at the scene. Officer Greaves was taken, by patrol vehicle, to St. Agnes Hospital. Other Officers pursued the suspect through a series of rear yards in the 1200 block of Poplar Grove Street. The suspect, who scaled fences in his attempt to flee police, took off his shirt and threw it under a bush in the rear of 1227 Poplar Grove Street. Officers finally encountered him in the rear of 1215 Poplar Grove Street. As the Officers approached they ordered the suspect to stay still and not to move. Disregarding this order the suspect made a move toward the Officers and they fired several shots at him. He was then placed under arrest and was transported to St. Agnes Hospital where he was treated for minor gunshot wounds and was released. He was taken to the Southwestern District where he was charged with Assault with Intent to Murder Officer Greaves.

 

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Officer James Weglein

 Officer James Weglein

Central District Officer Wounded August 25, 1980 For the fourth time this year a Police Officer was recently wounded on duty. 4 Fortunately none of these shootings have inflicted serious injury due to the soft body armour ,the officers wear. In an incident earlier this year an officer's soft body armour stopped what could have been two fatal bullet wounds of the chest and abdomen.   Officer James Weglein Just before midnight on August 25, 1980, Officer James Weglein, Central District, assisted other officers and a sergeant serving a search and seizure warrant for narcotics at an apartment on Guilford Avenue. While two officers secured the rear of the building, Officer Weglein went to the front door with another officer and the sergeant. Their knocking and repeated calling out of "Police" produced no response. They forced the door, again shouting "Police" and entered, Officer Weglein in the lead. Suddenly a shotgun blast rang out from a hallway in the apartment. Officer Weglein raised his hands to his face and fell backwards against a wall. He quickly recovered and helped return fire at a man illuminated by the shotgun muzzle flash. The room fell silent. Officers, maintaining their defensive positions, called out for the suspect to surrender. For several moments there was no response. The suspect fired additional shots down the hallway as the officers continued to implore him to surrender. Finally the assailant called out that he was wounded and surrendered his shotgun. The officers arrested the suspect and administered first aid. Although struck in the face by shotgun pellets Officer Weglein led the suspect from the scene to an officer outside. Officer Weglein was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment from a few shotgun pellets to his face, hand and arm. He would return to work within a week, suffering injuries to his wrist from falling backward after being shot, and the multiple gunshot wounds from the shotgun pellets. After a month of light duty, he would return to full and active duty. He was awarded the Departments Citation of Valor. The suspect was hospitalized for a chest wound, and was charged with multiple assaults with intent to murder.

 

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Officer Durwood Hood

 Officer Durwood Hood

Officer Hood Wounded December 23, 1980   Officer Durwood Hood Shortly after 1 :30 a.m. on Tuesday, December 23, 1980, Officer Durwood Hood of the Eastern District heard a broadcast description of a man wanted for the armed robbery of a taxi-cab driver in his District. As Officer in Charge he was responding to the 2200 block East Lanvale Steet, where the robbery occurred. As he drove East on Federal Street the officer saw the suspect walking South on Montford Avenue. He pulled along side, got out of the Police Cruiser and approached the suspect, ordering him to place his hands atop the Police car. It was at this point that Officer Hood saw the gun in the suspect's hand. The suspect fired as the Officer ducked behind the car door for cover. Two more shots were fired at him after he had been struck in the lower back. The suspect ran to an alley in the rear of the 2200 block East Lanvale Street after firing two shots at Officer Larry Evans of the Eastern District who was in pursuit. Officers recovered the hand gun from the alley. They then began knocking on doors of residences of the 2200 block East Lanvale in hopes of turning up information regarding the suspect. A woman at one of the homes whispered to an Officer that the suspect was inside her residence. She dosed the door. Homicide Detectives and Eastern District Officers then knocked on the door once more and the resident and the suspect appeared in the doorway. The suspect was arrested without further incident. Officer Hood was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital for treatment of the gunshot wound to the lower left back. The suspect faces a variety of charges ranging from Assault with Intent to Murder two Police Officers, Armed Robbery and Breaking and Entering.

 

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Officer Theodore BlackOfficer James Clark

 

Officers Wounded January 9, 1984   Officer Theodore Black Shortly after midnight on January 9, 1984, two Central District Officers, who had arrested three men on the 11th floor of the High Rise Apartment Building, located at 734 West Fayette Street, called for a backup unit and a Cruising Patrol Wagon with which to transport the suspects to the Central District. Officers Theodore Black and Harry E. Sheppard III responded within moments and entered the lobby of the building. As they did so the elevator door opened and a woman pointed out a man in the elevator car saying he had just robbed her. The suspect immediately fired a shot which struck Officer Black in the left thigh   Officer James Clark The suspect ran past the Officers to the front door of the building. Outside he encountered Officer James T. Clark, who had just arrived with his Cruising Patrol. The suspect fired twice at Officer Clark who was struck once in the upper right chest. At this point Officers Sheppard and Black came outside and pursued the suspect firing several shots. Medic Teams from the Baltimore City Fire Department arrived in a few moments and after initiating medical stabilization procedures, transported both Officers to University Hospital. Officer Black received medical attention and was listed in stable condition with a bullet lodged in his upper left leg. He was released the next day. Officer Clark's condition was listed as critical and medical treatment and evaluation continued on a round the clock basis. Officer Clark was released from the hospital on January 15th and is continuing to recuperate at home. As the Officers were being administered initial and follow-up medical treatment, virtually every member of the Baltimore Police Department searched for the suspect. Detective Carl B. Layman of the Howard County Police Department, after consulting with the Officers and another witness, produced a sketch of the suspect. This sketch was widely distributed to Police Officers throughout the city and to each citizen through the splendid cooperation of Baltimore's newspapers and television stations. As a result, literally dozens of phone calls were received by Detectives of the Homicide Unit. This resulted in the early morning arrest of the suspect a few days later. Officer Clark's parents reside in Boston, Massachusetts, where his father retired after a distinguished 34 year career with the Boston Police Department. The family was alerted and came to Baltimore to be with Officer Clark during the initial stages of his recovery. Expenses for hotel accommodations and other necessary items were borne by the Signal 13 Foundation which, beginning September 1, 1983, has been making grants to members of the Department during their time of personal emergency. Police Commissioner Frank J. Battaglia pointed out that Officer Clark's unfortunate injury provides an example of just one of the ways in which the Signal 13 Foundation can act quickly to provide meaningful assistance during a time of need. UPDATE Shooting Early last month, Central District Officers Theodore Black and James T. Clark were shot when they responded to assist with the arrest of three men by other Officers. Officer Black was shot in the left thigh and Officer Clark in the upper right chest as they happened upon a man who had just assaulted and robbed a woman in an elevator. The suspect was arrested a few days later. Both Officers are expected to fully recover from their wounds. Officer Clark's parents reside in Dorchester, Massachusetts, where his father retired after a distinguished 34 year career with the Boston Police Department. The family was notified and immediately came to Baltimore to be with their son. Upon Mr. & Mrs. Clark's return to Dorchester, they wrote: Dear Commissioner Battaglia: My wife, myself and our entire family wish to take this means to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to you and the members of the Baltimore Police Department for your concern and sympathy during a most trying period. The courtesies shown to my wife and I were beyond all expectations. When we arrived at Baltimore-Washington International Airport you can well imagine the deep concern we held for our son's condition. We had been advised to contact the Central District of Baltimore Police Department upon our arrival. Because of the pressure and circumstances we had evidently recorded the wrong telephone number. We appealed to the State Police Detachment on duty at BWI. The courtesy and help extended to us by the Sergeant-in-charge and the other officers will always be remembered and was surpassed only by the actions of the officers of the Baltimore Police Department. Unfortunately, because of our distraught state of mind we failed to obtain the names of the officers of your department who were assigned to assist us. Enough cannot be said in praise of them. We would appreciate your extending our sincere gratitude to each and everyone of them. As a retired law enforcement officer. I find new pride in having been associated with a profession that shows such genuine concern for its own. Sincerely, Walter M. Clark Many of the Clarks' needs were met locally. The Signal 13 Foundation, Inc., quickly mobilized their resources and defrayed the cost of the Clarks' round trip air and expenses while in Baltimore.

 

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Officer Johnny LaGrone

 Officer Johnny LaGrone

Off-Duty Officer Shot and Killed Accidentally June 28, 1984, Officer Johnny l. LaGrone, Southwestern District, tragically lost his life due to gunshot wounds he received while off duty on June 28. Officer LaGrone, a 2 year veteran, was in the process of moving from his residence when an 8 year old child obtained possession of his service revolver and shot him with it. Even though responding officers and Fire Department Medical Technicians did everything possible to aid the stricken officer, he died a short time later at the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services.

 

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Officer William Scott

 Officer William Scott

Off-Duty Police Officer Stabbed July 14, 1984, Officer William Scott On July 14, 1984, Officer William Scott, Northwestern District, while off duly, attempted to quell a disturbance between several people. While assisting one of the participants with leaving the area, he was approached from behind and stabbed several times in the back. Officer Scott was able to pursue the suspect and wound him with his service revolver. The suspect was captured by responding on duly officers who also tended to the wounded officer. Officer Scott has been released from Johns Hopkins Hospital and is expected to make a full recovery.

 

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Officer Richard Phillips

Officer Richard Phillips 

Wounded July 24, 1984 - Officer Richard D. Phillips, Western District, was shot as he struggled with an assailant during the evening of July 24, 1984. Officer Phillips was walking foot patrol in the 2100 blk. Pennsylvania Avenue when he entered the rear yard of a vacant house he knew was often used by drug abusers. As the officer went into the dark yard, he was immediately struck in the rear of his head by a heavy object. Staggered by the blow, he withdrew his service revolver to defend himself.. Officer Phillips was attacked by the suspect and a struggle began for possession of the officer's service revolver. The weapon discharged into the officer's thigh and the suspect fled. Responding officers rendered aid to Officer Phillips who was transported by ambulance to a nearby hospital. His gunshot wound was found not to be serious. Officer Phillips is resting at home and is expected to make a full recovery. No suspect has been apprehended in Officer Phillips' shooting.

 

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Officer Donna CooperSergeant John Baker Jr.Officer John McNamera

 

Four Wounded In Six Days November 1984 Four members of the Department were the victims of gunshot wounds in separate incidents during the past two weeks. A fifth officer was the hostage of a shotgun wielding man   Officer Donna Cooper On the morning of November 2, Officer Vincent P. Cole, Central District, arrived at the scene of a shooting call. A man standing outside of a Park Avenue building told Officer Cole that a man living in a second apartment had shot and killed a first floor resident with a shotgun. Officer Cole entered the building, drew his service revolver, and walked through a hallway to the stairs leading to the second floor. Officer Donna M. Cooper arrived to "back-up" Officer Cole and ascended the stairs with him. On the second floor, a man suddenly appeared and pointed a shotgun into Officer Cole's chest. Unable to defend Officer Cole, and to avoid a second hostage taking, Officer Cooper backed down the stairs and summoned additional aid. At shotgun point, Officer Cole was ordered by the man to holster his weapon and sit on the steps. For several minutes, the man discussed the shooting of his neighbor while keeping the shotgun pointed at the officer.   Sergeant John Baker, Jr. While Officer Cole was being held hostage, special units throughout the Department began massing outside of the building to rescue him. Officer Cooper, along with Sergeant John F. Baker and Agent John J. McNamera had taken a position just inside the building doorway when the suspect saw them. He fired one blast from the shotgun wounding all three. Pellets struck Sergeant Baker in the face Agent NcNamera in his left hand and thigh, and Officer Cooper on an elbow. The wounds were minor allowing the three to escape the building and take cover.   Agent John McNamera The gunman forced Officer Cole into his second floor apartment, reloaded the shotgun and said he was going to again confront police. The gunman left the room and began walking down the stairs. Officer Cole, hearing on his radio that Officers had been shot by the man withdrew his revolver and ordered him several times to stop. The gunman continued and the officer fired, fatally wounding the man. Officer Cole disarmed the suspect and walked from the building. Sergeant Baker and Agent McNamera were transported to a nearby hospital where they were treated and released. Officer Cooper received treatment at the scene of the incident. On November 8, Officers Jessie J. McClain, Mason Land, Jr. and Loney Manley, all assigned to the Northern District, Narcotic Drug Enforcement Unit, received information that illicit-drugs were being sold in an apartment building on Woodland Avenue. The officers went to the building to investigate the complaint. Inside, the officers saw several men standing in the apartment building hallway. One of the officers made a purchase of cocaine. After the drug transaction, Officers Manley, Land and McClain identified themselves as police officers and attempted to make arrests. The suspects, however, began to flee. One suspect produced a handgun and began firing on the officers. The officers left the hallway to seek cover while they returned fire. Officer Jessie McClain was wounded in the right shoulder. A Signal 13 was called and other officers, only moments away, responded to assist. Officer McClain was transported to Sinai Hospital by a police supervisor. All six suspects were arrested either at the scene or within several hours and charged. Officer McClain was released from the hospital the next day with the bullet still lodged in his shoulder. It will be determined at a later date if additional treatment will be required. Recovery, however, is expected to be complete.

 

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Officer Paul Coster

 Officer Paul Coster

Merry Christmas Paul December 1984, Officer Paul Coster Christmas gifts this year came in many ways to many people. For most, Christmas morning found families across the metropolitan area around Christmas trees ripping open gaily festooned boxes to delight in their contents kept secret for so long. Toys, clothes, tools, games, food and good will made this a special time of year. The spirit of the season was especially memorable for a retired Baltimore Police Officer thanks to the concern of the Office of Retiree Affairs and generosity of the Signal 13 Foundation. For Retired Officer Paul Coster, the Signal 13 Foundation provided the gift of a better life. In 1968, Officer Coster retired from the Traffic Division. He retired as the result of a line of duty injury to his arm that he sustained while rescuing a trapped woman from a burning automobile. During retirement, Officer Coster developed an arthritic condition so severe that it resulted in the removal of his entire right hip and leg bone to the knee. This disability has confined Officer Coster to a wheelchair for the past several years. Officer Coster was unable to operate his manual wheelchair due to his arm injury. With the help of his wife, he was able to remain mobile. During the past few years, however, Mrs. Coster also developed medical difficulties that necessitated several back and neck operations. These operations no longer allowed her to push her husband's wheelchair. Officer and Mrs. Coster had a problem that seemingly had no attainable solution. A motorized wheelchair was, of course, the answer. But the several thousand dollar cost of the new wheelchair made that solution prohibitive. The quality of life for Officer Coster was rapidly fading. In the Fall of 1984, Officer Coster contacted the Office of Retiree Affairs and spoke to Sergeant Charles R. Daugherty. Under the auspices of the Office of Retiree Affairs, Sergeant Daugherty and his staff have assisted dozens of retired members with information and problems dealing with benefits, insurance, the Credit Union and other things that may affect retired people. Sergeant Daugherty was touched by the critical need of Officer Paul. To assist with the unique needs of Officer Paul, Sergeant Daugherty immediately enlisted the aid of the Signal 13 Foundation. Since August, 1983, the Signal 13 Foundation has provided assistance to members of the Department during times of personal crisis. Under the leadership of its Chairman, former Police Commissioner Frank J. Battaglia, the Board of Directors of the Foundation has enlisted many of Baltimore's prominent business people, community leaders and professionals into its membership. The Foundation has granted funds to assist with extraordinary medical expenses, reimbursement of critical personal property not covered by insurance , and to meet other crucial needs of members and their families. The Signal 13 Foundation Board of Directors met and enthusiastically agreed to underwrite the expense of a motorized wheelchair for Officer Coster. A local distributor of motorized wheelchairs was contacted and agreed to supply a premium machine at a substantially reduced cost. On December 21, 1984, Officer Coster and his wife, Theresa were the special guests of the Signal 13 Foundation and Police Commissioner Bishop L. Robinson at the Headquarters Building. At an afternoon gathering in the Headquarters Lobby of Foundation Board Members, Police Department Command Staff members and friends of Officer Coster, a special presentation was made. Awaiting Officer Coster were former Commissioner Battaglia and Commissioner Robinson with a new motorized wheelchair and a large card offering him Season's Greetings from the Signal 13 Foundation. After remarks by attending officials and from Officer Coster, he was gently lifted from his old manual chair into his new one. With a twinkle of excitement in his eyes, he engaged the chair mechanism and navigated a short course in the Lobby to the smiles and applause of everyone present. Christmas came early for Paul Coster. But this past Christmas will also be one that everyone who attended the ceremony will remember. On that day, the Signal 13 Foundation gave Paul the gift of a more complete life. For that gift to a retired Officer, the entire Department says thank you. To retired Officer Coster we say. . . Merry Christmas Paul.

 

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Officer Stephen Martin

Officer Stephen Martin 

Officer Martin Wounded April 8, 1985, Officer Stephen D. Martin, Northwestern District, was wounded in the face by a man brandishing a sawed-off shotgun during the afternoon of April 8, 1985. Officer Martin was inside a home in Northwest Baltimore in company with Officer Joseph E. Lettau investigating a domestic disturbance. While speaking with the complainant, Officers Martin and Lettau heard . . . "several gunshots and one shotgun blast outside." The officers quickly went out. Seeing nothing nearby, they ran a short distance to an alleyway. Officer Martin entered the alley ahead of Officer Lettau and saw, about 25 feet further in the alley, a man holding a sawed-off shotgun. Officer Martin commanded the man, who was walking away, to stop. At that, the man turned and fired a blast at the officer. Several pellets hit Officer Martin in the face along with debris from a brick wall he was standing next to. The wall absorbed much of the blast. Officer Martin, though wounded, returned fire at the suspect with his service revolver. The suspect fired a second shot, this time at Officer Lettau. Unseen by Officer Martin, but observed by Officer Lettau, were two more armed suspects in the alley. These suspects opened fire on Officer Lettau with handguns. Officer Lettau dropped to the ground as all the suspects ran from the alley. Officer Lettau ran to Officer Martin and led him from the alley as he called for additional assistance. Moments later, the area was flooded by fellow officers along with medical personnel to tend to Officer Martin's wounds. He was taken to a nearby hospital, treated for his injuries and released. He has returned to duty. Officer Lettau narrowly avoided injury. He later discovered a bullet hole in a leg of his uniform trousers! The shotgun assailants of Officers Martin and Lettau currently remain at large.

 

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Officer John Heiderman

 Officer John Heiderman

Officer Heiderman and “Tony” Wounded June 14, 1985, Officer John Heiderman On June 14, 1985, Officer John F. Heiderman, Traffic Division, was patrolling Druid Hill Park when he noticed a parked vehicle bearing only one license plate. He dismounted from his horse "Tony" and approached the vehicle which was occupied by two men. Officer Heiderman requested the driver's license and vehicle registration. At this time the driver of the car started the ignition in an attempt to drive away. Officer Heiderman reached into the car to shut-off the ignition. As Officer Heiderman attempted to get the car keys, 3 shots rang out, striking the officer twice. Police Officer Joseph V. Fonte, Northern District, heard the shots and saw Officer Heiderman stagger to the side of the road and collapse. He exited his vehicle and called out to the suspects who were driving away. Ignoring commands to stop, Officer Fonte fired at the suspect’s car several times. The suspects shot back, striking his vehicle. He then went to the aid of Officer Heiderman and radioed for medical help. Within seconds, a description of the suspect’s car and license tag was broadcast by Officer Heiderman. Police units from throughout the city attempted to locate the suspects' vehicle. Officer Heiderman was flown by Maryland State Police Helicopter to University Hospital's Shock Trauma Unit for gunshot wounds to the right arm and upper chest. In the early evening, an alert citizen called police and reported that a car matching the description of the suspects' car was seen in Northwest Baltimore on a parking lot. Foxtrot responded to the area and located the suspects' car for searching ground units. It was learned that the car was taken in an armed robbery and kidnapping committed in Weehawken, New Jersey the day before. With the assistance of the Weehawken Police Department, the identity of one of the two persons involved in the offense was obtained. Both suspects remain at large. Officer Heiderman was released from the hospital later that evening with a bullet still lodged in his upper chest. It will be determined at a later date if it will be removed. Recovery is expected to be complete. “Tony“, Officer Heiderman's horse, was also injured by one of the suspects' bullets. The bullet is lodged in the horse's right hip and will not require removal unless the horse shows signs of discomfort.

 

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Sergeant Terrance McLarney

 Sergeant Terrance McLarney

Sergeant McLarney Shot September 1, 1985, Sergeant Terrance McLarney Shortly before 6:00 p.m., September 1, 1985, a gunman robbed a service station located in the 2200 block of Edmondson Avenue at gunpoint. After obtaining the money he brandished his weapon at the 30 year old attendant who ran looking for police assistance. Officers quickly broadcast a description of the wanted suspect, warning Officers that he was armed with a handgun. Sergeant Terrance McLarney, 32, of the Western District was responding in the 2300 block of Arunah Avenue when a witness pointed to a spot in the bushes where the suspect was hiding. Sgt. McLarney requested a backup unit and was quickly joined by Western District Officer Reginald Hendrix, 26. Both approached, on foot, to within 8 feet of the bushes, their service revolvers drawn. As the suspect exited his hiding place, both Officers observed a weapon in his hand and ordered him to discard it. The suspect fired two shots, both striking Sgt. McLarney. He and Officer Hendrix returned fire. The weapon, a 9mm automatic, was subsequently recovered. One of its projectiles had penetrated Sgt. McLarney's soft body armor. He received a wound of the left abdomen. The other projectile struck him in the left thigh. He was taken to the Shock Trauma Unit at the University of Maryland Hospital where, at press time, he was in fair condition and recovering from his injuries. The suspect, Raeford Barry Footman of the 500 block N. Pulaski Street was also taken to the Shock Trauma Unit where he is being treated for wounds of the right shoulder and thigh.

 

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Officer Timothy Wade

 Officer Timothy Wade

Officer Wade Wounded September 12, 1986, Officer Timothy Wade On September 12, 1986, around 11 :00 p.m., Officer Timothy Wade, Northwestern District, was patrolling the 4200 block of Pimlico Road when he saw suspicious activity. He stopped his patrol car and approached a suspect to conduct a field interview. Suddenly, the suspect bolted and ran. Officer Wade pursued. After a short foot chase, he turned toward the officer, removed a handgun from his waistband and fired several shots at Officer Wade. The officer slumped to the ground after one of the shots struck him in the left side, just below the protective portion of his soft body armor. Fellow officers rushed to Officer Wade's location after hearing his transmission over the radio. An ambulance was called to transport him to Sinai Hospital. Officers at the scene began compiling information on the suspect's identity. Within hours, they had identified the shooter with the cooperation of citizens from the community. It was later learned that the felon that Detectives were searching for was wanted on two Warrants on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault by Shooting and a previous Handgun Violation. Members of the Patrol Division, Fugitive Unit, and Homicide Unit continued to search for four days in the Pimlico area for the suspect. They developed information that the suspect was hiding in an apartment located in the 2500 block of Edgecomb Circle North. As the Officers approached the building, the suspect hid in a crawl space under the roof of the apartment building. Members of the Department's Quick Response Team were able to capture him. He was transported to the Northern District Station and charged with Assault With Intent to Murder Officer Wade. Officer Wade, 21 years old, has been a member of the Department nearly a year. He joined as a Police Cadet and after graduating from the Education and Training Division was assigned to the Northwestern District in May of this year.

 

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Agent Eugene Cassidy

Agent Eugene Cassidy 

SOME HAVE MORE TO GIVE ~ Agent Eugene Cassidy~ "Medal of Honor Recipient" Baltimore City Police Officer September - October 2005 Volume 32, Number 5 From the Office of the Executive Director Patrick L. Bradley Maryland Police Training Commission Over the last decade I have had the honor of attending many graduation ceremonies for new law enforcement and correctional officers. Given the sentiments at these ceremonies it is not unusual for speakers to reference the sacrifices these (usually) young men and women are making to serve their community. Nearly all have the skills, talents and intellect to earn more money than they will in public safety. They have “answered the call” to serve their communities, and have sacrificed higher compensation, regular hours and a safe working environment. I get a very special feeling of appreciation that comes with the understanding of the willingness of these men and women to give up so much. For some, service as a public safety officer will require even more sacrifice…. when injury and harm go from potential to reality. For a few, thankfully a very few, the ultimate sacrifice of their lives will be the cost of their service. Others may incur physical or emotional injuries. It will be a life-long or life altering consequence of their duty as a police officer, sheriff or correctional officer. For those officers who survive the debilitating line-of-duty service injury there are few choices available. Certainly the career as a public safety officer is over. Insurance, pension or other compensation may offset the lost earnings, but there is nothing to replace the loss of what was once a promised and promising future. There are, of course, exceptions. One of these exceptional people is Baltimore City Police Agent Eugene Cassidy.

 

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In 1987, Police Agent Eugene Cassidy was patrolling the Baltimore City’s Western District when he spotted an individual he believed was wanted. In the ensuing confrontation, Agent Cassidy was shot in the head. His life was spared, but he lost his sight; totally, irretrievably, permanently. After the hospitalization and therapy, Agent Cassidy was faced with the decision as to his future and that of his young family. A full, tax-free, line-of-duty pension was available to him. But that injury-based retirement also meant the termination of Gene’s dream and desire to serve public safety. He wasn’t ready to call it quits. He wanted to stay a police officer. He would become a police trainer. College educated and experienced as a patrol officer in Baltimore’s most challenging neighborhoods, Gene Cassidy felt he had something to offer new recruit police officers. Not only could he instruct them on the knowledge and skills they would need, he could also demonstrate what it meant to be a police officer…..to serve the community and to give, above and beyond the call-of-duty, and to keep giving long after even the most committed would stop. I was the commanding officer of the Baltimore City Police Academy when Agent Cassidy was being considered for appointment as an instructor. When I asked the obvious question about why he would opt to continue working when a full pension was available he response was simple. He said he felt he had more to give. Working with a companion dog, an array of sophisticated Braille-related equipment and a contingent of supportive fellow- instructors, Gene Cassidy developed into one of Maryland’s premier public safety instructors. He is the living testimony of true essence of commitment to a vocation. Over the last fourteen years, Agent Eugene Cassidy has influenced more recruit and veteran police officers as an instructor than he could ever hope to in another capacity. Last month, Agent Eugene Cassidy accepted a retirement from the Baltimore City Police Department. He leaves a legacy of influence that will transcend many generations of officers. I am proud to have once been his commanding officer at the Academy and to have played some small role in his development as a trainer. I regard Gene Cassidy as an outstanding instructor, an extraordinary police officer and an exceptional human being. An example to all. "Butchie Frazier" the COWARD that shot Cassidy 

 

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10807096 10202988896035539 1073262439 n
Kathleen Irwin

 

14 March 2003
Anne Arundel

Police Say Assault Measure is Needed 
They Asked the Senate to Make Attack on Officer a Felony House Has Passed a Bill
Sun Staff Julie Bykowicz

In less than a minute, 54-seconds to be exact, an arrest attempt ended Kathleen Irwin's 11-year-career as a Baltimore police officer and left her bedridden and in a full-body brace for months.  The drunken man who shoved her into a metal shelving unit, rupturing a disk in her lower back, was charged with a misdemeanor and sentenced to 18 months of unsupervised probation.  This legislative session, police officers have stepped up their efforts for passage of a bill that would make assaulting an officer a felony. After four consecutive years of failure, the bill has made it farther than ever this year.  "It is my belief that if I were able to charge this suspect as a felon, he would have gotten a more appropriate penalty," Irwin told state senators this week at a hearing of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.  The House version of the bill passed 134-0 last week, and its Senate twin has 22 co-sponsors. If it makes it out of committee, the bill needs a simple majority of 24 votes in the Senate to head to the governor's desk.  "This will give police officers one more weapon in their arsenal," said O'Brien Atkinson, president of the Anne Arundel County Fraternal Order of Police.  "A lot of seriousness goes along with being a convicted felon, and criminals know that."  Maryland ranks fourth in the nation for assaults on law enforcement officers, with about 29 out of 100 officers assaulted in the line of duty each year.  Of the 3,947 officers assaulted in 2001, 572 were seriously injured, according to the latest Uniform Crime Report available.  Officers say the current felony assault law, which requires intent, does not work for them because their injuries e more often result from someone struggling to escape custody than from someone deliberately trying to hurt them.  Animal cruelty laws make it an automatic felony to assault a police dog, something law enforcement officers repeatedly pointed out at Tuesday's hearing.  `Worthy of no less'  "Surely, the men and women who protect you are worthy of no less consideration," Anne Arundel County Sheriff George F. Johnson IV said during the hearing.  Anne Arundel County law enforcement agencies and unions, who work closest to the state capital, have campaigned hard for the bill, showing up in droves each time there is action on it.  Sen. Janet Greenip, an Anne Arundel County Republican, introduced the bill in January. She said a heavily amended version of her bill addresses the concerns of some of her fellow legislators that every scuffle with police might qualify as a felony assault. The bill excludes "minor, temporary injuries."  Greenip began pushing for the bill last year as a delegate. When it failed to make it out of committee, she brought it to the floor as an amendment to a crime bill.  "People are finally waking up to the fact that we need these policemen, and we need to protect them in any way that we can," Greenip said. 

Staunch opposition

The bill's staunchest opponents have been defense attorneys, who say putting law enforcement officers into a special category could drive a wedge between police officers and the communities they serve.  Testifying against the bill Tuesday, Stanley D. Janor, a public defender in Baltimore, said it is "against public policy, disproportionate and unnecessary."  Prosecutors split on the bill.

Douglas F. Gansler, the Montgomery County state's attorney, spoke in favor of the bill. William M. Katcef, an Anne Arundel prosecutor who tracks legislation for the Maryland State's Attorney's Association, criticized it.  "The committee better look long and hard before it passes this bill," he said. Among his objections, he said, is a fear that bumping into a police officer could be categorized as a felony. Greenip said her bill makes it clear that such minor incidents would not qualify.  Katcef favored a measure introduced by Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr., a Prince George's County Democrat, that instead of creating a separate assault category for law enforcement officers would add five years to first- and second-degree assault sentences when the person assaulted is an officer.  Katcef said the Maryland State's Attorney's Association endorses Giannetti's bill.  Most law enforcement professionals at the hearing did not endorse Giannetti's bill, saying their fight to make assaulting an officer a more serious crime is aimed more at prevention than at increasing sentences.  "When someone is disorderly, we want to be able to look at them and say, `You assault me, it's a felony,'" Atkinson said  20 February 1993 12:03 PM police officer Kathy Irwin was chasing a shoplifter when the shoplifter turned and pushed her into some shelves which eventually turned fell on top of Officer Irwin causing a serious back injury which later needed surgery to area C for of her spinal cord forcing her retirement in 1995.

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Officers Shot During Dice-Game Robbery
30 July 2007

officers shot

July 30, 2007 BALTIMORE - The two officers were interrupting the robbery of a dice game. And they got shot for it. Baltimore police say wounded officers Karen Brzowsky, 34, and Loretta Francis, 29, were doing exactly what they were supposed to do Monday when a gunman opened fire on their patrol car near Patterson Park, striking each officer once. “They were doing everything the city is asking of them,” acting Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick Bealefeld said. “They were dispatched to that block by concerned residents. They answered the call and went there to do something about it. When they got there, they encountered a dangerous person, a violent offender in our city.” Police arrested Ranard Brown, 26, of the 1600 block of East Biddle Street in Baltimore, and charged him with two counts of attempted first-degree murder, two counts of assault and various weapons charges, police said. Attempted first-degree murder carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. Bealefeld said Brown has previously been arrested 14 times. Court documents show that he has been charged with misdemeanor assault, public urination, drug possession, disorderly conduct and a handgun charge, but never convicted of a crime. Margaret Burns, spokeswoman for Baltimore City State's Attorney Patricia Jessamy, said Tuesday that prosecutors had to drop the handgun charge because the police officer in the case did not show up for court. Officers caught Brown on Baltimore Street on Monday night, pulling him over while the department conducted a widespread search for his license plate number, police said. Brzowsky and Francis were shot between 6 and 6:30 p.m. as they encountered a robbery of an ongoing dice game, Bealefeld said. Several gunshots rang out, striking the right side of their car. Francis was struck in the abdomen, and Brzowsky, who was driving the car, was hit in the arm. Francis was treated and released from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Monday night. Brzowsky is “doing well; she’s resting,” said Sterling Clifford, a police department spokesman. Police recovered the gun used in the shooting outside “very near the crime scene” on Monday, Bealefeld said, who added that the gun had been reported stolen in Virginia. The commissioner credited residents for leading police to Brown. “The local residents stepped up and did their part,” Bealefeld said. Mayor Sheila Dixon called the officers “two brave individuals” and also thanked residents for turning the police investigation in Brown’s direction. “Citizens are recognizing that this is a partnership,” she said. Baltimore has experienced 182 homicides and 428 shootings this year. Homicides are up 19 percent and shootings 36 percent over the same period last year. Bealefeld said officers have seized more than 2,000 guns from the streets this year, compared with about 1,800 at this time last year. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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Rigby accident

 

Baltimore Police Officer thrown off I-83, is critically injured   June 21, 2011 Baltimore Police Officer Teresa Rigby was handling the most routine call on one of the city's most treacherous roads. Just three years out of the academy, the officer was assisting a disabled car on the northbound Jones Falls Expressway — an elevated, curving highway with narrow breakdown lanes and lined with Jersey barriers marred with scrapes from cars whose drivers veered out of their lanes. It's a stretch of road where, many officers hesitate to pull over seeders because it's too dangerous an area to stop.

At 9:20 a.m., a black Saab struck the back of Rigby's parked marked cruiser, with all emergency equipment activated, just south of Cold Spring Lane, hitting or forcing her off the highway and onto the parking lot of a Pepsi plant some 30 feet below. The 27-year-old officer was rushed to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where she was listed in critical condition with injuries that included multiple leg fractures. Dr. Thomas Scalea, physician-in-chief of the University of Maryland shock trauma center, told reporters before 1 p.m. that Rigby was on life support and would be going into surgery. Rigby had semi-conscience. She required several surgeries and months of therapy. She was extremely lucky that she did not die as a result of this incident.

 

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Any request for official police information must be made directly to: Baltimore Police Department. 242 W. 29th St., Baltimore, MD Emergencies: 9-1-1 Non-emergencies: 410-396-2037 BALTIMORE POLICE Web Site: http://www.baltimorepolice.org   If you enjoy this site please consider making a donation to the Baltimore Police Memorial Fund. All money goes directly toward improvement and maintenance of our own Baltimore Police Memorial, located at Fayette and President Streets {The Shot Tower Plaza}

 

Mailing address: BALTIMORE POLICE MEMORIAL FUND 3920 Buena Vista Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21211

 

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

 

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

 

 Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

 

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EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Baltimore City Police History
The Official Motto of the Department

Established on 
November 9, 1880
"Semper Paratus - Semper Fideles - Ever on the Watch"

"EVER READY - EVER FAITHFUL"
"
EVER ON THE WATCH"

 Baltimore City Police Historical Timeline

1700 - 1800

1729 - 8 August, 1729 - The preservation of the peace, protection of property and the arrest of offenders has been the goal of Baltimore residents since August 8, 1729, when the Legislature created Baltimore Town, 100 years before the "London Metropolitan Police Department" was founded by Sir Robert Peel (1829) Note: Sir Robert Peel "Bobby" Peel is widely believed to be where the nickname of the police helmet "Bobby Cap" came from, upon founding the London Metropolitan Police Department, officers were quickly called Bobby Cops, or Bobbies, likewise their hats, "Bobby Caps"
1775 - Would be the start of what would come to be 9 years of haphazard policing in "Baltimore Town" where mistakes were made, but those mistakes were learned from, and in 1784 "Baltimore Town", decided to form a paid "Watch", in which the Watchmen could be fired, or otherwise penalized, for neglect of duty. These first attempts to form the Nightwatch had male inhabitant capable of duty sign an agreement, in which they swore to conform to police regulations adopted by the citizens and sanctioned by the Board of Commissioners, to attend when summoned to serve as night watchmen. This committee had some of the functions of the 1888 Board of Police Commissioners. (The town was divided into Districts and in each of these was stationed a company commanded by a Captain of the Nightwatch.)
1775/76 - The first Captains of the watch, or police, in Baltimore, under this primitive arrangement, were Captain James Calhoun, of the First or Central District; Captain George Woolsey, Second District; Captain Benjamin Griffith, Third District; Captain Barnard Eichelberger, Fourth District; Captain George Lindenberger, Fifth District; and Captain William Goodwin, of the Sixth District. At Fell's Point, Captain Isaac Yanbidder, with two assistants, or Lieutenants. Each Captain had under his command a squad of sixteen men, every inhabitant being enrolled, and taking his turn. The streets were patrolled by these watchmen from 10 pm. until daybreak. 
1784 - The First Attempt to Organize a Paid Force to Guard Baltimore occurred in 1784. Constables were appointed and given police powers to keep the peace. Baltimore's Police Department had been developing their police force since the formation of our "Night Watch" in 1784. In the beginning, they were "Necessary to prevent fires, burglaries, and other outrages and disorders." This from (Chapter 69, Acts of 1784). This was 45 years before Sir Robert Peel's London Metropolitan Police was founded in 1829.
1784 - Baltimore would obtain Street Lights by order of the Police Department - These lights were oil lamps and they were lit by order of the police, they were extinguished by the police, and they were maintained by order of the police. It was not so obvious to the public as it were to the panel of commissioners, and to the council of city hall, but the lighted streets in Baltimore were a deterrent that prevented, and decreased crime, in and around "Mob Town". While at first many of the ideas, and or theories of the Panel of Commissioners, and or Our Marshals were often shot down, or put off until they either died in committee or were funded privately. Still, many of these ideas went on to become the norm in law enforcement throughout the country, and around the world.  Furthermore, these concepts would eventually be paid for, and widely approved of and authorized by state legislatures.
1797 - 3 April 1797 - the City Council passed the first ordinance affecting the police. It directed that three persons were to be appointed Commissioners of the watch. They could employ for one year as many Captains and watchmen as had been employed in the night watch the year past for the same remuneration. The Commissioners prescribed regulations and hours of duty for the police.
1798 - 19 March 1798 - An officer known as “The City” or “High Constable”, was created by the ordinance on March 19, 1798. His duty was "to walk through the streets, lanes and alleys of the city daily, with mace in hand, taking such rounds, that within a reasonable time he shall visit all parts of the city, and give information to the Mayor or other Magistrate, of all nuisances within the city, and all obstructions and impediments in the streets, lanes, and alleys, and of all offences committed against the laws and ordinances." He was also required to report the names of the offenders against any ordinance and the names of the witnesses who could sustain the prosecutions against them and regard the mayor as his chief. The yearly salary of the city constable was fixed at $350, and he was required to give a bond for the performance of his duty.
1798 - Baltimore made the first of certain steps toward creating the chief of police, or marshal as he was later called. A high constable was appointed, and it was his duty to tour the city frequently, carried a mace, the badge of authority, and to report on lawbreakers.  By the turn of the century, Baltimore had again become an unmanageable, riotous city. It was now a bustling community of 31,514 in population and one historian remarks naively, "The city was a rendezvous of a number of evil characters."
1799 - 26 February 1799 - Authorized the appointment of a city constable in each ward. This ward constable was thus a policeman, and the term of city constable was not properly his although his duties were defined by the ordinance to be the same as those of the city or high constable.

 

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This is the UNOFFICIAL History Site of the Baltimore Police Department. It depicts the history of the department as was originally conceived of, and told by Retired Officer, William M. Hackley. Sadly Officer Hackley passed away on 15 March 2012 leaving his site to Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll. It took a month or so to take full responsibility for the site and its content. The thoughts and use of certain items, terms, sounds, and implications are not necessarily those that would be agreed upon by the Baltimore Police Department, as an official Governmental Agency. Likewise, we do not seek their permission, or approval to post the things we post, and as such, nothing in these pages should be held against them.

The intent of this site is more than just to tell our history, to have everyone remember our Injured, and Fallen Heroes, those who in the performance of their duties were called upon to make the Ultimate Sacrifice.

So as you surf these pages, you will see the Baltimore Police Department from its infancy, showing the crude methods of policing in the 1700's, through to the 1800's and become the modern highly efficient department that it has become today.

Enjoy the site for what it is, a rendition of the proud history of one of this country’s finest Police Departments, one for which those of us who have worked it, are proud of, and honored to have served. The many men and women that still proudly serve, and those that someday will serve.

Any request for official police information should first be made directly to:

Baltimore Police Department
242 W. 29th St., Baltimore, MD.
Emergencies: 9-1-1  Non-emergencies: 410-396-2037
BALTIMORE POLICE Web Site: http://www.baltimorepolice.org 

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Again please contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll if you have pictures of you, your family, or other members of the Baltimore Police Department and wish to see them remembered here on this tribute site. We are anxious to honor the fine men and women who have served this fine police department. Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll can be reached at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Like us on Facebook, or contact us for a mailing address 

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

 

1800 - 1900

1800 - 30 April, 1800 - At this meeting a committee of three persons from each ward was appointed to plan a reorganization of the “Night-watch”. At a subsequent assembly on April 30, this committee advised that the patrol be increased. The recommendation was approved, and by the vigilance of the watchmen disorder was suppressed for a time.
1807 - 9 March, 1807 - A general ordinance was passed defining the duties of the city commissioners. They were given large powers. Among other things, with the Mayor they were authorized to employ as many captains, officers and watchmen as they might, from time to time, find necessary, but the expense should not exceed the annual appropriation for the service. The board was also required to make regulations and define the hours of duty of the watch; see that they attended to their duties with punctuality, receive their reports and cause them to be returned to the Mayor's office.
1808 - 15 March, 1808 - We lost our Brother Night Watchman George Workner .
1816
- 7 February 1816, The Baltimore Police turned maintenance of the street lights over to Peale's Gas Light Company of Baltimore. The first gas street lamp in America was lit at the corner of N. Holliday St. and E. Baltimore St., where there still stands a replica of this light as a tribute to the rich history of our city, our police department, and the initiation of gas lighting in this country. As a side note the first home to have gas light was the residence of William Henry, a coppersmith located in the 200 block of Lombard Street.
1826 - 9 March, 1826 - the Mayor was given control of the police. The power given the Mayor was unlimited. The ordinance provided that the Mayor should appoint annually two Captains, two Lieutenants for the Eastern District; two Captains, four Lieutenants for the Middle District; two Captains, two Lieutenants for the Western District. He could also appoint any number of watchmen.
1826 - 9 March, 1826 - The Mayor was given control of the police of the city by an ordinance which provided that there should be appointed, annually, two captains and two lieutenants of the watch for the Eastern District; two captains and four lieutenants of the watch for the Middle District and two captains and two lieutenants of the watch for the Western District. They were expected to perform such duties as the Mayor might, from time to time, direct. The latter was also given power to appoint as he chose any number of watchmen, and to dismiss them at his pleasure. He was also to prescribe their duties.
1826 - Central/Middle District History - 9 March, 1826 - Holiday and Saratoga Streets, established 03-09-1826, building that housed it was built in 1802 and was in use until 1870. 202 N. Guilford Avenue, (North Street) built in 1870 used until 1908. Saratoga and St. Paul Streets, renovated school, March 4, 1908 until 1926. Fallsway and Fayette St. built in 1926 and used until 09-12-1977 when they moved to 500 E Baltimore St. from 12 Sept 1977 until present.
1826 - Eastern District History - 9 March, 1826 - 1621 Bank Street built around 1822, still stands. Used
until 31 Aug 1959 at 12:01 am when they opened their new station house at the old Northeastern station at Ashland and Rutland Avenue, until a new building was erected at Edison highway and federal streets, in Dec of 1960 and is the current site on the Eastern District. When it opened (in 1959) it was ran by Capt. Millard B Horton.

1826 - Western District History - Green St between Baltimore St, and Belvidere St. Used from 1826 until 1876 when they moved to their new location, Pine Street, (still stands today and is used by the Maryland University Police) Baltimore Police used it from 1876 until 31 Aug 1959 at 12:01 am when they opened their new station house at
Riggs Ave and Mount St. (1034 N Mount St), which is the current site on the Western District. When it opened it was ran by Capt. Wade H. Poole.
1835 - 9 March, 1835 - A "Supplement” to this ordinance, which was passed on this day, provided for the appointment of twelve lieutenants of the watch, constituted policemen " to preserve the peace, maintain the laws and advance the good government of the city."  These lieutenants were required to reside in certain districts by the Mayor and have conspicuous signs on their houses bearing their names and office. In addition to their police duties, they were required to act as city bailiffs about the markets, their compensation was fixed at $20 a month for their night work as lieutenants of the watch and they received an additional sum of $220 a year for the services mentioned by the ordinance.
1835 - The Middle District - April, 1835 - Located at Saratoga and Holliday streets; the Western District in Green street near Baltimore and in Belvidere street. The last named 'watch house had a belfry, and in April, 1835, an appropriation was made for a similar addition to the Green street watch house; and in this year Mayor Jesse Hunt took occasion to call the attention of the councils to the "Lamentably defective" police arrangements of the city.
1836 - March 1836 - The compensation of the watchmen was increased to $1 for each night they served.
1837 - 17 May 1837 - the first issue of the Baltimore Sun is printed - The first article in the Baltimore Sun that references our police is titled Rioting and as we would expect it is a negative report, that even when police explain the article was incorrect, the paper still runs the story. It was a response to the police briefly being mentioned, however so brief, it was import the initial report is undated (some believe it may have been a morning issue of the same date with the response coming in the evening edition.
1838 - 22 May, 1838 - The councils substantially re-enacted the ordinance of 1835, providing, however, that if any watchman while in the performance of his duty should be wounded or maimed he should receive half-pay during the continuance of his disability, or for a period not exceeding two months. They were also paid for attendance at court. This ordinance provided as well for the annual appointment of three justices of the peace to receive the reports of the night watch. One of these justices was required to reside in each district. The yearly salary of each was $100.
1843 - In 1843 two cells were put in the Western watch house while in the Eastern house there was hut one. In the same year the Baltimore Sun declared that the custom of the watch calling the time notified thieves of the locality of the patrol and gave the former an opportunity of safely conducting their operations. This custom was consequently abandoned.
1845 - 18 February, 1845 - The Southern District was established under an ordinance. Two captains and four lieutenants were appointed for it, and the boundaries of the other districts were rearranged.
1845 - Southern District History -
The Southern District was first located at Montgomery and Sharp Streets, where it sat from 1845 until 1896 when they moved to Ostend Street. Ostend Street and Patapsco Street, where it remained in use from 1896 until 1985/86, when it moved to 10 Cherry Hill Road where it remains in use to present. When it opened on 31 Aug 1959 it was ran by Capt. Elmer I. Bowen.
1848 - The Baltimore police, as constituted in 1848, consisted in the daytime of one high constable, one regular policeman for each ward, who was also lieutenant of the night-watch in his district, and the night watch men. Besides these there were two extra policemen for each ward, who were called into service as occasion required. This system of day police was changed from time to time to keep pace with the increase in the number of wards in the city, until the wards numbered twenty. There was, however, no material alteration in the system until 1857, when a complete reorganization took place under the authority of an act of the Legislature passed in 1853
1850/1861 - (Mayor member Ex-officio) Charles Howard,  William H Gatchell, Charles d Hinks, and John W Davis
1850 - Charles Howard, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1850-1861
1851 - 20 October, 1851 - the first known metallic badge worn by Baltimore Police Officers also known as the 1st. Issue badge.  
1853 - The State Legislature on March 16, 1853, passed a bill, "To provide for the better security for the citizens and property in the City of Baltimore." This statute provided that police officers should be armed and that a badge and commission be furnished each member. The former act of 1812 was repealed with the passage and enactment of this bill. No change occurred in the police organization until 1857. 
1856 - 13 November, 1856 - We lost our Brother Night Watchman John O'Mayer
1856 - 11 December, 1856 - City Council votes on, and passes a bill to arm Baltimore Police Officers - 1857 was a date given by History Channel's "Tales of the Gun" - the "Police Guns" Episode, with an original air date, of 2 April, 2000, in which they reported, "Baltimore as having become the first Department in the nation to issue, and provide each police officer with a firearm." The documentary went on to state The Colt, 1849, Pocket Model, was the weapon of choice, and was 1st issued, and used by the BPD and it's Officers. Sometimes information contradicts information and as such, we located two Sun Paper articles; one dated,11 December, 1856, entitled "Proceeding of City Council", in which arming the individual City Police Officer was voted in to law, then on 25 December, 1856 an article titled "The New Police Bill" the bill was released. While all of the actual revolvers may not have been provided in 1856, they were approved into law on that 11 December, 1856. ALSO NOTE: We're only providing the aforementioned information about, "Baltimore being first to arm their police" out of respect for the Discovery Channel, and their source(s), but I suggest, at least for now, that we take it with a grain of salt. Still, I will leave this until we find further info, or others that read this line from a Sun Paper article, Dated 11 December, 1856, in which a member of City Council at the time trying to pass his bill to arm Baltimore Police said, "In New York and Philadelphia where there is a penalty for carrying concealed weapons, the police are armed by the city authorities." This is being taken by us to mean, we may have been at least 3rd in the issuance of firearms, but by these reports, we were not first.
1857 - 1 January, 1857 – Came the next important change under the provisions of this act; the ordinance, introduced an entirely new order of things, and placed Baltimore's Department of Police on practically the same footing as those of the other large cities of this country. It declared that after; 1 March 1857, The existing watch and police systems should be ABOLISHED, and all ordinances for the establishment and regulation of the same be repealed. The new force consisted of one marshal, one deputy marshal, eight captains, eight lieutenants, twenty-four sergeants, three hundred and fifty police officers, five detective police officers and eight turnkeys. The men were required to do duty day and night, and were given all the powers then vested by law in the city bailiffs, police officers, constables and watchmen. The city was divided into four police districts, whose stations were at the watch-houses. The Marshal, with the concurrence of the Mayor, was given authority to establish the limits of the stations, divide them into beats, making allowance for a proper force to retain at the station houses. He had power also to alter at will the limits of the districts and beats. At this time, the Detective Bureau was established. The City was divided into four police districts. Middle/Central, Eastern, Western and Southern.
1857 - 15 August, 1857 – 200 Revolvers are purchased for issuance to Baltimore's Police Officers.
1857 - 17 Sept, 1857 – City Council approves spending $3845.95 on 200 Revolvers
1857 - 11 Oct, 1857 – Possibly the First Police Involved Shooting with issued firearms. The officers involved were, Deputy Marshall Manly, and Officers G.H.E., Bailey, Nicholson, Saville, Lee, George Bailey, Andrew, Presto, Chapman, and Englar. Shot was Deputy Marshall Manly, and Suspect Andrew Hesslinger was killed, and an African American named Ramsey. The shooting took place at a bar called Seager’s Lager Beer Brewery at 7 o’clock on that Sunday, the establishment situated upon the Frederick Road at its intersection with West Pratt Street.
1857 - 14 October, 1857 - We lost our Brother Sergeant William Jourdan
1857 - In this year 1857 the department compelled Patrolmen to wear uniforms both on and off duty. They had several rules, 1) Winter uniforms were made up of a black cap bearing the policemen’s number, dark blue overcoat, and trousers with a patent leather belt, and the word "Police" prevalently stamped upon its buckle. 2) Summer uniforms were the same minus the overcoat. Policemen were required to wear standing collars. 3) The badge of their authority was a star 3 inches; it was worn on the left breast of their coat. The star was often sewn on to avoid all chances of an officer being without his badge. In the old days our brothers would occasionally leave their badges home; so having them sewn on alleviated that situation. Taking away an excuse used by thugs that would use a badgeless officer as an excuse to assault him and then claim he didn't know his victim was an officer. 4) The final piece to the officer’s uniform was his "Billy Club", known in Baltimore as an "Espantoon" it was recognizable as it was often carried in the officer's hand, spun on a leather strap, or tucked under the officer's arm. While in the station or when both hands were needed otherwise, the Espantoon might be seen hanging from a ring on their belts. 5) They also carried pistols back then.
1857 - 1 March 1857 - First Detective Squad - The first squad of detectives was appointed by the mayor, under the New Police Bill in Dec of 1856 - By this time the city’s chief executive again controlled the force.  There were five Detectives in the first squad and they wore civilian clothes. As was mentioned above Patrolman were compelled to wear uniforms both on, and off duty.  In winter the uniform was a black cap with the policemen’s number on it, a dark blue overcoat, trousers with a patent leather belt and the word police printed on it. These first five apointed Detectives were - Detective Thomas W. German, Detective Christian Barnes, Detective William Stevens, Detective Wm. L. Tayman, and Detective Jerome Airey
1858 - 16 March, 1858 - The Legislature of the State took memorable action in passing a bill to "provide for the better security for life and property in the City of Baltimore." This enactment empowered the Mayor and the City Councils to increase, and in every way strengthen the police, whether officers, bailiffs, night-watchmen, or in any way connected with the organization of the force. When any of these guardians of the peace were injured either in person or apparel, while in the discharge of his duties, the act required that he be fairly indemnified. This statute also provided that the police force should be armed, that a commission and badge be furnished each member, and that it should be no defense for anyone who resisted or assaulted an officer to claim that his commission or badge was not exhibited. This statute repealed the act of 1312.
1858 - 22 September, 1858 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Benjamin Benton
1858 - 5 November, 1858 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert M. Rigdon
1859 - 27 June, 1859 - Police and fire-alarm telegraph adopted June, 1858; first put into operation
1860 - 2 Feb, 1860 - Baltimore Police force placed under State control
1860 - Other innovations of the time was the inception of the Marine Unit in 1860 - 
The Harbor Patrol would begin patrolling the harbor based on wording in legislature that had a large portion of the waters Baltimore City, and therefor had to be protected by City Police. Budget at the time wouldn't allow for steam, or other motor based boats. Marshal Jacob Fray was called in to figure out what could be done about the problem. An 1886 sun article said if the times, "They hadn't the funds to buy a patrol boat. What then? Well Marshal Frey conceived of the idea of placing rowboats at advantaged positions, using points where the various districts touched the harbor waters. Four boats total, two for Eastern, one for Central and one for Southern." (NOTE: There was no "Southeast" at the time, Southeast didn't come until 1958) A second article from 1958 went on to say, "It would then be a simple matter of jumping in the boats at the required time, of pushing out from land and then of rowing over the regulated beats. It was all somewhat surprising, efficient and a novelty that worked for 31 years."
1860 - 1 May, 1860, we switched our badges to the 2nd issue badge. It was a new “Metropolitan Police" force under a Board of Police Commissioner’s (BOC), state-appointed civilians, signaled the retirement of the "Corporation Police force" and the new badge was authorized.
1861 - 19 April, 1861 - was a fateful day for Baltimore police, who had to stop rioting citizens to protect Union Soldiers passing South through the city.
1861 - 27 June, 1861 to 29 March, 1862 - (Under control of the United States Military authorities) Police Commissioners Appointed by the Military authorities - Columbus O'Donnell,  Archibald Sterling Jr.,  Thomas Kelso,  John R Kelso,  John W Randolph,  Peter Sauerwein,  John B Seidenstricker,  Joseph Roberts, and Michael Warner
1861/62 - In March of 1862, the military authorities who had taken control of the Department on June 27, 1861, turned over the Police Department to the authority of the state.
1862 - In 1862 Baltimore's Police commissioner suggested they form a Park Police; the purpose of the Park Police was to police the new Druid Hill Park, which at that time was wholly beyond the city limits and thus beyond the authority or city Police, city's Park Commission was first granted the right to preserve peace in parklands by the City Charter of 1862 (this department disbanded in 1959 with members joining the Baltimore Police).
1862 - 22 June, 1862, a newly formed Baltimore Police force appeared in a completely new uniform with a new series of badges. Known as 3rd Issue it had the same center section of the first badge, and returning the designation of "City Police" surrounded by twenty small points encircled by a narrow rim.  Note: The 20 pointer was replaced by an order from the Commissioner. He said "too many were in the hands of the citizens." (This was found in an article in the newspaper circa1890.)
1862 - 29 March, 1862 to 15 Nov 1866 - (Mayor member Ex-officio) Samuel Hindes, and Nicholas L Wood
1862 - Nicholas L.Wood, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1862-1864
1864 - Samuel Hindes, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1864-1866
1866 - 15 Nov, 1866 to March 1867 - (Mayor member Ex-officio) William T Valiant, and James Young,
1866 - James Young, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1866-1867
1867 - The first State agency to exercise police powers was the Baltimore City Police Force. Established in 1867 under a Board of Police Commissioners, the Force was elected by the General Assembly (Chapter 367, Acts of 1867).  Baltimore's police force, from 1867, was governed by a State board although jurisdiction was limited to the City.
1867 - March 1867  Lefevre Jarrett,  James E Carr, and William H B Fusselbaugh
1867 - LeFevre Jarrett, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1867-1870
1868 24 July, 1868 (Friday) - The Baltimore Flood overtook the city. In a crisis the bravery of Commissioner Carr in rescuing the victims of the catastrophe, became a matter of national fame. Harper's Weekly, at the time, in a long article on the floods, quoted the following editorial notice from the Baltimore Sunday Telegram, of July 26, 1868: "It is a true saying, that in times of great public calamities, some men rise to the position of a greatness, and such was the case with Police Commissioner James E. Carr.
1870 - 5 July, 1870 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James Murphy
1870 - 14 March, 1870 - John W Davis,  James E Carr, and William H B Fusselbaugh
1870 - John W. Davis, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1870-1871
1871 - 12 January, 1871 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles J Walsh *
1871 - 22 May, 1871 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Clark
1871 - 14 September, 1871 - We lost our Brother Detective John H. Richards
1871 - 15 March, 1871 - William H B Fusselbaugh,  James E Carr, and Thomas W Morse
1871 - William H.B. Fusselbaugh, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1871-1881
1872 - 18 August 1872 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Christopher
1872 - 22 Nov 1872 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Franklin Fullum *
1873 - 12 January 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman John H. Dames *
1873 - 12 January 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James T. Harvey *
1874 - Northwestern District History - 1874 - The Northwestern District was first opened at Pennsylvania Ave and Lambert Street where it remained until 1958/9 when they moved to their present district on Reisterstown Rd.
1874 - Northeasten District History - 1874 - The Northeastern District was first opened at Ashland and Chew Streets (Durham) where it remained until 1958/9 when they moved to their present district at 1900 Argonne Drive.
1875 - 15 March, 1875 - William H B Fusselbaugh, Harry Gilmor, and John Milroy
1876 - Baltimore switched from the Colt "Model 1849" Pocket Model to the Smith & Wesson "Baby Russian", nickel plated.  These remained in service until approx. 1910 when various models were purchased for field trials. Flip flipping back and forth over the years from Colt to Smith and Wesson, Smith and Wesson to Colt and so on, up until 1990 when the Department began phasing in the Glock "Model 17" 9mm Semi-Automatic.
1877 - 15 March, 1877 - William H B Fusselbaugh,  Harry Gilmor, and James R Herbert
1878 - 12 April, 1878 - William H B Fusselbaugh,  James R Herbert, and John Milroy
1880 - 9 November, 1880 - The Motto for the department began in the Central District and was displayed on a plaque on the gymnasium wall, "Ever on the Watch" written in English, under the Latin words "Semper Paratus" and "Semper Fideles" - "Semper" can either mean, "Always" or "Ever" - so it could read either "Ever Ready / Ever Faithful / Ever on the Watch" or "Always Ready / Always Faithful / Ever on the Watch". Throughout history "Semper Paratus", and "Semper Fideles" have consistently been read as "Always". However in Baltimore using "Ever on the Watch" over "Always on the Watch" leads us to believe in this case "Semper" stood for "Ever" - Giving us "Semper Paratus - Semper Fideles - Semper Alapa Buris Pervigil" or "Ever Ready - Ever Faithful - Ever on the Watch"
1881 - 15 March, 1881 - George Colton,  James R Herbert, and John Milroy
1881 - George Colton, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1881-1887
1883 - Mourning for fallen officers, and the passing of officers, was ordered upon the death of Capt. Franklin Kenney of the Eastern District. The mourning time was established, and set for a period of 10 days for fallen officers and 5 days for passing officers.
1883 - 15 March, 1883 -  George Colton,  James R Herbert, and John Milroy
1883 - 27 September, 1883 - We lost our Brother Captain Benjamin Franklin Kennney
1884 - 5 Aug, 1884 - George Colton,  John Milroy, and J D Ferguson
1884 - 6 January, 1884 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles W. Fisher
1884 - Southwestern District History - 1884 - 17 July 1884 The Southwestern District was first opened at Calhoun and Pratt Streets (200 S Calhoun St) where it remained until 11 July 1958 when they moved to their present location at 424 Font Hill Ave.
1884 - "Central District" takes on this new title, from it's former "Middle District" as was reported in a 1905 sun paper report in which the author wrote of a library of police docket books "
A single glance along the long row of frayed and weak back books is interesting, as it shows exactly when the old "Middle District" changed its name to the more dignified title of "Central District". The record for 1884 is the first book bearing the name "Central District" Maintenance
1885 - 15 Oct 1885, Jacob Frey begins his term as Marshal from Oct 15 1885 - Jul 12 1897
1885 - 18 October, 1885 - The first Patrol Wagon went into service on October 18, 1885 - and is believed to make Baltimore the second to use patrol wagons in the country, behind Chicago. The story goes; One day Deputy-Marshal Jacob Frey was reading an illustrated magazine, while in the gymnasium of Central's Station when he saw facts on Patrol Wagons being used in Chicago. He brought the idea before the board of police commissioners; they were mildly interested. Frey didn't give up on ideas that he believed in so he called the board’s attention to the matter again some weeks later. They had forgotten about it, but promised to look into it. Wagon's and Police Telegraph Box Systems, were the future in Frey's eyes, so after the legislation failed to act, the board "Marshal Frey" took matters into its own hands. He sent one of the members of the "Board" and "Marshal Gray" to Chicago to see how the "New Fanged" patrols wagons worked. They "Were Charmed" an old records states. And while there they saw Chicago’s new police telegraph box system. (Known as the callbox) result was both facilities were in Baltimore by the fall of 1885. According to Gamewell's records, Chicago was the first to use the Police Telegraph System, and Baltimore was the second in this country to use this system.
1885 - 18 October, 1885 - On the same day the wagons went into effect Baltimore Police Department also began using the Police Telegraph Boxes (Call boxes) the pilot program was begun in the Central District with 58 boxes in that district alone. The system of Call Boxes would quickly spread to be used in all Districts, and on all posts/bailiwicks. The first Call Box tested was Box #63 located on the corner of Franklin and Charles Streets in the Central/Middle District. Our Boxes were described as having been approximately 4 ft from the ground, made in two sections, the phone section in the top compartment, with the lower compartment housing a "Dial" system in which an officer could put the pin of the dial on whatever he wanted, from back-up to a wagon, ambo etc. These first boxes were painted red in color.
1885 - The Harbor Patrol was established in 1885. (Not to be confused with the Marine Unit which was initiated in 1891 when we obtained our first Police Boat, "The Lannan") 
1886 - The Police Helmet, (Bobby Cap) worn in other cities, was made part of the uniform in Baltimore. (It was introduced by Commissioner Alford J. Carr.  Taking the place of the derby or bell cap formerly worn by Baltimore police.  Commissioner Carr specified that the black helmet was to be worn in the winter, and the pearl gray helmet worn during summer months.  The helmet at that time was significant of rank, only patrolman and sergeants wore it.  The Marshal and his Deputy Marshal as well as all Captains and Lieutenants wear the regular cap of the period.)
1886 - 25 Feb, 1886 - George Colton, John Q A Robson, and John Milroy
1886 - 25 Jun, 1886 - George Colton, John Q A Robson, and Alfred J Carr
1887 - 15 March, 1887 - Edson M Schryver, Alfred J Carr, and John Q A Robson
1887 - Edson M. Schryver, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1887-1897
1888 - The Mounted Patrol was established.
1888 - 23 Jan, 1888 - Edson M Schryver, John Gill Jr, and John Q A Robson
1889 - 28 March, 1889,
Ten incandescent electric lights which will illuminate the heretofore gloomy pathway in Druid Hill Park leading from the Clipper gate to the walk from the Mansion House to the main entrance on Madison Ave, were lighted last night (28 Mar 1889) for the first time. The lamps are placed upon cedar posts about the height of a street gas lamp, and are lighted simultaneously by the turning of a lever in the gate keeper’s house at the Druid Hill's Entrance to the park. Street lamps were initially began in this country at the suggestion of the Baltimore Police Department when they used oil lamps that would be lit, extinguished and maintained by Baltimore’s Police, the year was 1784. It was not so obvious to the public as it were to the panel of commissioners, and to the council of city hall, but the lighted streets in Baltimore were a deterrent that prevented, and decreased crime, in and around "Mob Town". While at first many of the ideas, and, or theories of the Panel of Commissioners, and or, our Marshals were often shot down, or put off until they either died in committee, or were funded privately. Many of these ideas would go on to become the norm in law enforcement throughout the country, and around the world.  Furthermore these concepts would eventually become widely approved of, paid for, and authorized by our state legislatures.
1889 - 4 July, 1889 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John T. Lloyd
1890 -
27 May, 1890 - What came to be known as the 4th Issue badge was worn with a new uniform by all members of the force. This is a shield-shaped badge with the word "POLICE" across the top, Maryland seal in the center and a ribbon with the officers number across the bottom. Sergeant's and above had an eagle on top of their shield. Lieutenants and above wore a badge similar to the Sergeant but was gold in color. The eagle on the badges had a ribbon in its beak denoting the rank of the officer. These were worn from 1890 until 1976
1891 - 15 July, 1891 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jacob Zapp
1891 - 10 August 1891 - The Formal Start of Baltimore's Marine Unit -
The little steamer is the harbor police cruiser "Lannan”  named in honor of former Deputy Marshal John Lannan, deceased, who had charge of her construction. The Lannan was built in 1891 by James Clark & Co., from plans kindly loaned the Department by the United States Government. The harbor patrol boat was completed on August 10, 1891, and after a very successful trial trip was accepted and immediately put into commission. 
1894 - 20 June, 1894 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James T. Dunn 
1894 - 20 June, 1894 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Michael Neary
1894 - 1 Dec, 1894 - Edson M Schryver, John Gill Jr, and John C Legg
1895 - 17 October, 1895 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Dailey
1896 - 20 June, 1896 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William Wilder
1896 - The Bertillon Bureau was established to take photographs and measurements of prisoners. Bertillon system n. A system formerly used for identifying persons by means of a detailed record of body measurements, physical description, and photographs. The Bertillon system was superseded by the more accurate procedure of fingerprinting.
1896 - 27 March, 1896 - Daniel C Heddinger,  John Gill Jr, and Edson M Schryver
1897 - 15 March, 1897 - Daniel C Heddinger,  William W Johnson, and Edson M Schryver
1897 - 13 July, 1897 - Thomas F Garnan, was Deputy Marshal / Acting Marshal from July 13 1897 - Oct 6 1897
1897 - 7 Oct, 1897 - Samuel T Hamilton was Marshal from Oct 7 1897 - Oct 7 1901
1897 - 12 July, 1897 - the active connection of Marshal Jacob Frey, with the Police Department ceased. On October 7, 1897, Capt. Samuel T. Hamilton was elected Marshal of Police to succeed Marshal Frey. Marshal Hamilton was a veteran officer of the Civil War and a man of indisputable courage and integrity. For many years following the great civil conflict he had served on the Western frontier and took part in the unremitting campaigns against the Sioux and other Indian tribes, who were constantly waging war upon the settlers and pioneers as they pushed their way toward the setting sun, building towns and railroads and trying to conquer the wilderness and its natural dwellers. In the Sioux campaign of 1876, when Gen. George A. Custer and his gallant command, outnumbered ten to one by the Indians in the valley of the Little Big Horn, were annihilated, Captain Hamilton and his troop rode day and night in a vain effort to re-enforce Custer and his sorely pressed men. It was on June 26, 1876, the Seventh United States Cavalry rode and fought to their deaths, and on June 27, the day following, the reinforcements arrived, exhausted from their terrific ride across the country. Captain Hamilton and his troop fought through the rest of the campaign, which resulted in Sitting Bull, the great Indian war chief, being driven across the Canadian frontier.
1897 - Daniel C. Heddinger, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1897-1900
1898 - Fall of 1898 ground was broke on Northern District. What was being built on a piece of land purchased by the City, at Cedar and 2nd was called Northern's annex. (a new District) to be ran by Capt. Thomas W Morris
1899 - 29 August, 1899 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Alonzo B. Bishop
1900 - 1 Feb, 1900 - Northern District History - 1900 The Northern District was first opened at Keswick and 34th Street on 1 Feb 1900 at 8am ran by Capt. Gittings, Lieutenants Henry and Dempsey; Round Sergeants will be, Warden for Day Duty, and Moxley for Night Duty. At the time they began with 50 officers. It remained at the Keswick location until 2001 when it moved to its current location at 2201 W Coldspring Lane. 

1900 - 2000

1900 - The interesting thing about the Board of Police Commissioners and eventual single Commissioner is that the Commissioner(s) for the City of Baltimore were to be chosen and appointed by the Governor for the State of Maryland.
1900 - 7 May 1900 - George M Upsher,  Edward H Fowler, and John T Morris
1900 - George M. Upsher, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1900-1904
1901 - 8 October 1901 - Thomas F Farnan Deputy Marshal was Acting Marshal from Oct 8 1901 - Aug 7 1902
1902 - 20 May 1902 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John a McIntyre *
1902 - 30 July 1902 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles J. Donohue
1902 - 21 August 1902 - "1000 members of Police Department to re-take Oath" - The entire department was forced to re-take their oath of office, as prior to this day, they had been improperly and illegally sworn in, and this was the case for 35 years. (See - BPD News under the Insight Drop-down Tab)
1902 - 8 October 1902 - Thomas F Farnan,  Appointed Marshal from Oct 8 1902 - Aug 8 1914
1904 - 7 February 1904 - The Great Baltimore Fire raged in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, on Sun, Feb 7 and Mon, Feb 8, 1904. 1,231 firefighters were required to bring the blaze under control, both professional paid truck and engine companies from Baltimore City Fire Departments BCFD and volunteer fire companies from the surrounding counties, along with some out of state units that came in on local railways. The fire destroyed a major portion of central Baltimore City, to include over 1,500 buildings covering an area of some 140 acres. It spread from North Howard Street on the west, north to the retail shopping areas on Fayette Street and began moving eastward as it was pushed by prevailing winds. Baltimore Police not only helped to fight the fires, and evacuate buildings, but they also fault crime associated with this type chaos, in which looting almost always begins.
1904 - 23 March 1904 - George M Upsher,  John T Morris, and Thomas J Shryock  
1904 - 2 May 1904 - George R Willis,  James H Preston, and Thomas J Shryock
1904 - James H. Preston , was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1904-1908 (Gov. Warfield made him a member of the Board of Police Commissioners for Baltimore City, 1904-08) He went on to become Baltimore's Mayor in 1915
1904 - George R. Willis, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1904-1908
1904 - 26 November, 1904 became the first time fingerprints were officially used (to catalog criminals) in the United States when John Randles was held over on a theft charge. He was printed by Sgt. John A. Casey who had recently returned from St. Louis where he had been trained in the technique, initially it was felt the system would work along side the Bertillion system, but instead it was found to be more efficiant and so it quickly replaced all of the Bertalion system except two or three photos, initially they used a front on head shot and two profile shots, now they only use two shots, the front on head shot and a single profile. 
1904 - 7 December 1904 - Fingerprint Identification Section - After becoming the first police department in the country to use the new Fingerprint System of identification when on 26 November, 1904 Baltimore Police Department would go on to use 7 December 1904 as the inauguration date of our Finger Print Identification Section.. 
1905 - 27 July 1905, The "Beauty Squad" otherwise known as the "Traffic Squad" went on duty. Some wore a patch on their left sleeve of the Maryland Coat of Arms surmounted by an Eagle with outstretched wings. This was done to set them apart from other police in the area, an interesting note in the colors of the Calvert family Quarters, instead or Or and Sable (Gold and Black) they were given Orange and Black in error as the patch maker mistook Or for an abbreviation of Orange. Initially all men didn't not wear the patch, before long they all wore the patch and a distinct orange and Black cord on their helmets. To this day we still use Orange and Black for our ribbons and in other city logos and mottos.  
1905 - 
16 January 1905, Might be the department's first recorded attempt at maintaining of our Department's History, when Patrolman William Burgess of the Central District began his new job in his new office as, "Librarian and Keeper of the Archives of the Central District," based on the following as we can see from the following Sun paper report: 
HERE  
1905 - 26 January 1905 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Mathew Boone * (1
1905 - 25 December 1905 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles Spitznagle * 
1907 1 August 1907 - The Department was to receive a Columbia Electric Automobile when complete the machine was put to use in the Central District as an Ambulance and Patrol (Paddy) Wagon. It was said to have been easy to run and easily made 16 miles an hour. Unlike the illustrated picture used to show Baltimore’s New Police vehicle, Baltimore’s Wagon would come with windows and curtains  
1908 - The Traffic Division was established. 
1908 - 4 May 1908 Sherlock Swann,  John B A Wheltle, and Peter E Tome 
1908 - Sherlock Swann, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1908-1910 
1908 - 7 November 1908 - After 22 years, The Baltimore Police Department stop using the Police Helmet, (Bobby Cap), and goes to a more modern round, or oval top, police hat. From the Baltimore Sun - The Baltimore Police go from the Bobby Type Helmet to the more modern cap and Officers donned new uniforms, veteran Captains returned to old Districts, caps supplant helmets and Espantoons are in use once again. 
1909 - 4 March 1909 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas H. Worthington * (2) 
1910 - 2 May 1910 -  John B A Wheltle,  Peter E Tome, and C Baker Clotworthy 
1910 - John B.A. Wheltle, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1910 -1912 
1911 - 16 September 1911 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Joseph Smyth 
1912 - 25 November 1912 - We lost our Brother Officer John McGrain * 
1912 - 19 June 1912 - The first Women Officer was hired under the title of Policewomen was Mary S. Harvey, EOD of June 19, 1912 her hiring was followed by that of Margaret B. Eagleston July 22, 1912 (interesting side note on March 28, 1925 the Baltimore Sun reports - Two female members of department given first lesson in pistol shooting. They were Miss Margaret B. Eagleston and Mrs. Mary J. Bruff - A few days later Mrs. Mary Harvey, Miss Eva Aldridge and Ms. Mildred Campbell were also trained. So basically the first two woman officers hired by the BPD weren't trained in firearms until they had been on the force for 13 years!)  
1912 - 4 April 1912 John B A Wheltle,  Peter E Tome,  and Morris A Soper 
1912 - 6 May 1912 Morris A Soper,  Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1912 - Morris A. Soper, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1912-1913 
1912/13 - The Baltimore police goes from Horse Draw "Patty" Wagons to motorized wagons. Oddly enough our first motorized wagons were manufactured by the same builder. 
1913 - December 1913 - The Police Academy was established. - What later became known as our Police Academy, was first called “The Baltimore Police Department - School or Instruction” - It was house in the Northern District - From a 1934 newspaper article referencing this "School of Instruction", it talks about the effect on its young police, initially they wrote, "It's not long, this eight-week course that they put the newcomers through, upon the filth floor of the Police Building at Fallsway and Fayette, but it is both thorough, and exacting. And since its founding fourteen years ago [an indication that it was moved from it initial location to the new headquarters in 1920] by Commissioner Gaither; the school has served as something of a guide, and model for virtually every big city in the country," Departmental officials said. 
1913 - 31 December 1913 James McEvoy, Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1913 - James McEvoy, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1913-1914 
1914 - 29 May 1914 - The Motor Unit was organized on May 29, 1914 - It began with just five members, Officers, Schleigh, Bateman, Pepersack, Vocke and Louis. 
1914 - 17 October 1914 - The first female officer shot in the line of duty was Policewoman Elizabeth Faber. As she and her partner, Patrolman George W. Popp were attempting to arrest a pick-pocket on the Edmondson Avenue Bridge they were both shot. (An interesting side note, the first woman police hired by the Baltimore Police department were hired two years earlier in June and July of 1912, and none of the women hired received firearms training until 1925) 
1914 - 28 December 1914 - Daniel C Ammidon,  Clarendon I T Gould, and Alfred S Niles
1914 - 14 August 1914 - Robert D Carter Appointed Marshal August 14 1914 - until after 1917 
1914 - Daniel C. Ammidon, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1914-1916 
1914 - "Luxe" and "Morpheus" Baltimore’s first K9 - A little known fact, while not an official unit, Baltimore had two Police Dogs at their call when two Airedale Terriers from London came to enroll as members of the Police Force. Their owners learned two dogs were already here, privately owned, one belonging to Mr. Jere Wheelright, and the other to Dr. Henry Barton Jacobs. “Luxe”, Mr Wheelright's dog was a superb example of a highly trained equine aristocrat, big, powerful and intelligent to a degree that was truly remarkable. Morpheus Dr. Henry Barton Jacobs dog also a superb example of a highly trained K9. It would be 42 years before we would have an official K9 Unit, but off and on since 1914, we had, had Police Dogs used in both a private, and official capacity. But not until 1956 did we establish an official unit, with an official methodology that would go on to become world known as the best K9 unit. 
1915 - 18 April 1915 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George C. Sauer
1915 - 21 September 1915 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Herbert Bitzel  * (3)
1915 - 15 February 1915 - Baltimore begins its first ever Bike Squads, from four booths throughout the city, they worked two shifts, 4x12 12x8, they rode in 2 hour rotations, splitting time with officers in the booth. Dispatch phoned the booth, and calls were sent forward from there to the units on their bikes. The concept was to provide better police service to the rural homes in the city 
1916 - 22 March 1916 Lawrason Riggs,  Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles
1916 - 1 May 1916 Lawrason Riggs,  Edward F Burke, and Daniel C Ammidon 
1916 - Lawrason Riggs, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1916-1920
1917 - 22 January 1917 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Michael Burns * (4
1917 - Circa 1917 (The title Chief was Marshal in Baltimore City) 
1918 - 19 March 1918 - We lost our Sister Police Matron Teresa Foll *
1919 - 3 July 1919 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Lanahan 
1919 - 5 January 1919 - 33 Former Members of Baltimore County Police Department were accepted by the Baltimore City Police Department as the Annexation Act allowed 60 men to patrol the 50 square miles of the Annex, Area's such as "Canton" and "Highlandtown" formerly Baltimore County are now Baltimore City. 
1920 - 2 October 1920 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Michael J Egan * (5
1920 - In 1920 the Board of Police Commissioners was abolished and General Charles D. Gaither was appointed as our first Police Commissioner. Charles D. Gaither was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1920-1937 
1921 - 1 January 1921 - Police Commissioner Charles D. Gaither began the three-platoon system for Baltimore's police force, in less than six months' time the eight-hour tour of duty for Baltimore policemen will be in force. With everything he needed from theNecessary Equipment Including at Least 30 motorcycles with side cars (one article said several of the sidecars were equipped as prisoner transport vehicle. 
1921 - 4 March 1921 - Marine Unit Radios Installed - Commissioner Gaither announces telephone-radio communication from his Marine Unit. He announced he would be using Navy surplus telephone-radios. The radios would be installed in Deputy Marshal George G. Henry’s office, as well as both police boats the Lannan and the Carter. These were set up as one-way radio’s in which the Marshal could pass information on the two police boats. The boats could then go to one of eight police call boxes strategically placed on shore. It would be nearly two years later in June of 1923 that they would have the system converted over to a Two-way radio system. In this instance, they used the most current military surplus radio equipment, set first in the Robert D. Carter, and most of the Fire Department’s Fire boats with more boats to follow. Note: On 4 March 1933 - Radio Communication was established for the first radio communications system between Patrol Vehicles and a Central Dispatcher went into service using the same surplus telephone-radios Commissioner Gaither picked up for the Marine unit nearly 10 years earlier all of this first suggested to the Board of Estimates in September of 1931. 
1921 - Early in the year of 1921 we tested the first signal light (aka Recall Light) on a call box that was located on the southeast corner of Baltimore and Charles Street. The signal (Recall Light) was made up of an electric light bulb, a washbasin to shade the lightbulb and a Marine lens. The mechanism for the operation of this light was located in the old Central Police Station House on Saratoga Street near Charles Street, it consisted of an alarm clock for the flashing apparatus. This method of notifying the officer that he was wanted proved very successful. Every uniformed man from the inspector to the patrolman was enthusiastic over the results, by the end of first week of this "Magic Blinker" there had been a demand for more from the other seven districts. 
1922 - 17 September 1922 – The 1921 Recall Light experiment was so successful that we would put them in every district and on nearly every call box in the city. This would be a first time anything like this had been done anywhere in the country, and just as the experiment caused excitement in getting this program expanded to the entire city, it wouldn’t be long before other jurisdictions also had this system installed everywhere. By 1945 Baltimore had 269 recall light throughout the city on a much better model recall light than that 1st experimental model from 1921. Note: the first light was the idea of Gen Gaither, and was made by in-house maintenance, from spare parts, in fact they used an alarm clock for the flashing apparatus. 
1923 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Edward Swift *
1924 - 2 March 1924 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frank L. Latham
1924 - 20 June 1924 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles S. Frank *
1925 - 2 January 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George D. Hart * (6)
1925 - 17 May 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Patrick J Coniffee * (7)
1925 - 1 November 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Leroy L. Mitchell
1925 - 3 July 1925 - We lost our Brother Patrolman John E. Harris * (8
192528 March 1925- Two female members of our department were given the first lesson in pistol shooting for our women officers. Baltimore policewomen received their first lesson in the use of firearms. Lieut. James O. Downes, expert marksman and instructor of the Baltimore Police Department's Pistol Team, explained the use of pistols to the two policewomen. Mrs. Mary J. Bruff and Miss Margaret B. Eagleston were the students who appeared at the Central police station yesterday. (Note: The first women hired in Baltimore to police, were hired in June and July of 1912. Two years later 17 October 1914, we had our first woman Officer shot in the line of duty, Patrol Woman Elaibeth Faber was shot on the Edmonston Ave Bridge, alongside her partner Patrolman Popp who was also shot, and still it would take 11 years of women to be trained and armed) 
1926 - 09-12-1926 Baltimore Police Headquarters and Central opened at Fallsway and Fayette St. where they remained until 09-12-1977 when Central moved to 500 E. Baltimore St. The building was demolished in 1984 
1926 - 9 February 1926 We lost our Brother Police Officer Milton Heckwolf
1926 - 29 June 1926 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Webster E. Schumann
1926 - 12 July 1926 - We lost our Brother Police Clerk Thomas J. Dillon
1927 - 5 August 1927 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William F. Doehler
1928 - 12 February 1928 - We lost our Brother Sergeant George M. J. May  
1928 - 22 February 22, 1928, The first vehicle actuated control was tried out in Baltimore. (To the best of our knowledge this was the first vehicle actuated signal insulation in the world.) - This was an automatic control was a brake attachment and two funnels placed on poles on the right-hand side of the cross street, ordinary telephone transmitters being installed inside the funnels. These transmitters being connected to the sound relay, which when disturbed by noise for example, the tooting of horns, blowing of whistles, or the sound of voices would actuate the sound relay, releasing the break on the automatic control permitting the motor to run. This would change the signal which had been green on the main street to amber, then to read, permitting the side street traffic to move out on the green. It would automatically reset to red. This device was invented here in Baltimore. - This control would always restore itself back to the main street green, then the break would set and the signal would remain green on the main street, until disturbed again by sound. Several of this type were installed, one being at Charles Street and Coldspring Lane, another at Charles and Belvedere Avenue  
1928 - 19 November 1928 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Joseph F. Carroll
1929 - 26 July 1929 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James M. Moore  
1931 - 7 January 1931 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John P. Burns
1932 - 2 January 1932 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William A. Bell
1932 - 4 October 1932 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas F. Steinacker
1933 - 21 April 1933 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John R. J. Block 
1933 - 4 March 1933 - Radio Communication Est. The First radio communications system between Patrol Vehicles and a Central Dispatcher went into service on March 4, 1933. Note Commissioner Gaither first suggested this system the Board of Estimates in September of 1931
1934 - 12 February 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Blank
1934 - 2 November 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John A. Stapf
1934 - 20 December 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry W. Sudmeier
1935 - 14 February 1935 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Max Hirsh
1935 - 31 October 1935 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Arthur H. Malinofski
1936 - 9 October 1936 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Leo Bacon
1936 - 29 October 1936 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Carroll Hanley
1936 - 28 December 1936 -  We lost our Brother Police Officer John T. King, Jr.
1937 - 31 December 1937 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. Barlow
1937 - 17 November 1937 - We lost our Brother Capt. Charles A. Kahler *
1937 - First African American Officer Violet Hill Whyte, became Baltimore Police Department's first African American officer she worked out of the Western District for her 30 year career with the department.  
1937 - William Lawson, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1937-1938
1937 - 28 May 1937 - For the first time in the history of the Baltimore Police Department, women have been advanced to the rank of Sergeant - Mrs. Cronin and Misses Lillie, Lynch and Ryan Promoted, The women, four in number, joined the force during or immediately after the World War, when there was a shortage of men, and functioned for a time as telephone and signal operators. Under terms of a bill signed Friday (28 May 1937) by Governor Nice, they will hereafter enjoy the rank and the pay, which is $46.50 a week as against their previous $40-of sergeants. 
1938 - 1 November 1938 - We lost our Brother Chief Engineer Joseph Edward Keene
1938 - Robert F. Stanton, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1938-1943
1938 - 21 February 1938 - Accident Investigation Unit Est. The Accident Investigation Unit was established on February 21, 1938. 
1938The first African American male officers hired were Walter T. Eubanks Jr., Harry S. Scott, Milton Gardner, and J. Hiram Butler Jr. were hired in 1938, all of whom were assigned to plainclothes 
1938 - 5 July 1938 - Baltimore Police initiate the “Vice Squad” a name for the unit was going to be, the “Clean-up Squad” set up under the concept of preventing or reducing STDs – The unit was began within hours of a report made to the Grand Jury. Newspapers of the times speculated that there was an underlying reason for this squad, and that it had more to do with combating organized crime, and that it resulted from two tavern bombings, on Druid Hill Ave and Whitelock St. The other on Woodyear St. 
1939 - 5 May 1939 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Charles W. Frizzell
1940 - 13 June 1940 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William L. Ryan
1941 - 11 January 1941 - We lost our Brother Capt. Havey Von Harten 
1941 - Auxiliary Police Force Est. In December 1941, after Pearl Harbor our Police Commissioner (Robert F. Stanton) realized he would be losing a lot of his men to the war effort, so he quickly organized an "Auxiliary Police Force" a unit of Civilian Defense Organization, which now has a membership of approximately two thousand persons, whose services are on a strictly voluntary basis without remuneration of any character. These men are selected from owners of big business, and executives-men in all walks of life including laborers and the unemployed (if you meet the requirements it doesn't matter what you do for a living, your help is welcome). In 1941 they originally provided at their own expense, uniforms and patrol box keys etc. The department furnished badges, whistles and night sticks. They receive ten hours training in first-aid, two hours instructions in handling of bombs, and at least six hours instruction in police work, during which period they are assigned to work with the regular uniformed patrolmen. They were required to report to various districts and to perform two hours actual police duty assigned them by our District Captains. The purpose which the Auxiliary Police was serving and the manner in which its members have discharged its duties are worthy of the highest commendation, for it has been a most effective instrument in aiding in the preservation of law and order. Cooperation between this unit and the regular uniform force are. Basis for the progress made in combating crime. After the war there was a bit of dissension among the Auxiliary Police Force and the regular force  
1943 - 13 June 1943 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Woodcock 
1943 - 7 November 1943 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William S. Knight
1943 - African American officers were finally allowed to wear police uniforms, and by 1950, there were fifty African American officers in the department. 
1943 - Hamilton R. Atkinson, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1943-1949
1944 - 29 January 1944 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Waldsachs * (9
1944 - 7 October 1944 - The Baltimore police switches from the round, or oval top police caps that were worn for a little more than 30 years after the "Bobby Cap" type helmet, to the current "Octagonal" or "Eight point" hat we wear today.
1945 - 2 June 1945 – Policewoman Ada F Bresnan of the Baltimore Police Department, became the first woman elevated to the rank of Sergeant. Sgt. Bresnan was appointed to the department in November of 1929.  
1945 - 17 August 1945 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Burns 
1945 - 10 September 1945 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John B. Bealefeld 
1946 - 1 March 1946, we lost our Brother Patrolman George H. Weichert * 
1946 - 27 June 1946 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James M Shamer * 
1946 - 20 November 1946 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Elmer A. Noon 
1947 - 13 January 1947 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Fred R. Unger 
1947 - 13 October 1947 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles Hart * 
1947 - 25 January 1947, The Baltimore Police Department promotes one of the Department's First African American Officers to the Department's first African American Police Sergeant. Patrolman James H. Butler Jr. now Sergeant Butler was formerly a College Football Player until hired by Commissioner William P Lawson, on 28 July 1938, as he was among the first three African American males hired by the Department. 
1948 - 13 February 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Daniel Benedict 
1948 - 1 October 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. Burns 
1948 - 30 December 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John W. Arnold
1948 - Crime Lab Est. The Baltimore Police Department’s 1st Crime Lab
1949 - 4 April 1949 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James L. Joyce
1949 - 16 October 1949 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. O'Neill
1949 - Beverly Ober, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1949-1955
1950 - 4 August 1950 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles M. Hilbert 
1951 - 6 January 1951 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Roland W. Morgan
1951 - 19 April 1951 - Meritorious Service Board created
1951 - 1 June 1951 - Medical [Section] Bureau Established 
1951 - 7 August 1951 - Central Records Established and Central Records Division was created
1952 - Armory Est. in 1952 the Gun-shop (now called the Armory) was established
1952 - In the department started using a Single Rocket Type Shoulder Patch, it was black with yellow trim, and yellow letters that read, "Baltimore City Police" and was worn on the left shoulder of the officers coat, or jacket.
1953 - 1 August 1953 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James L. Scholl 
1954 - 14 February 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Alfred P. Bobelis
1954 - 19 April 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Aubrey L. Lowman
1954 - 1 July 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Walter D. Davis 
1954 - Mobile Crime Lab Est. May of 1954 The Mobile Crime Lab Unit was established.
1954 - 1 July 1954 - Radar Unit Began it consisted of 2 cars 3 officers. Warnings were given for the first several weeks after that summons were issued. 
1954 - July. 1954 - The practice of paying salaried in cash was stopped and paying by check began
1955 - 24 October 1955 - We lost our Brother Sergeant James J. Purcell
1955 - 1 November 1955 - After nearly 20 years and four police commissioners arguing for and against Parking meters; Parking meters are finally signed into law and on 1 Nov 1955 the first parking meter was installed and went into use on North Ave in Baltimore City. These meters were enforced by Baltimore Police department's Traffic Enforcement Section.
1955
- 28 November 1955 - Polygraph Unit Est. First in the State Commissioner Hepbron brings the machine to help build a polygraph unit within the Rackets Division of the department. (In 1966 this unit would be transferred to the Crime Lab unit - Before the move to Crime Lab this little machine will cause headaches for the commissioner that brings it to Baltimore)
1955 - James M. Hepbron, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioners from 1955-1961
1956 - 27 May 1956 - We lost our Brother Police Lieutenant William P. Thompson  
1956 - 29 September 1956 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John R. Phelan 
1956 - Baltimore’s K9 Unit was initiated - On Tuesday, December 11, 1956, an article was published in one of our local newspapers which was one of a series of articles written by one Martin Millspaugh pertaining to Scotland Yard. This article the last of a series was devoted to the use of police dogs in London. As a result of the letters and inquiries received by Commissioner James M. Hepbron, an article appeared in the Morning Sun on December 17, 1956 which briefly stated that Commissioner Hepbron was interested and saw the possibilities of using dogs in the Baltimore City Police Department. On December 18, 1956, two dogs (Turk & Major Gruntz) that had had previous training were offered to the Baltimore City Police Department and, with two officers (Patrolman Thomas McGinn and Irvan Marders) also with previous dog experience, the program was put into effect on an “experimental basis”. By the middle of January 1957, fourteen dogs had been acquired as potential candidates and fourteen men were selected and assigned to the K~9 Corps. These men were chosen as a result of a questionnaire which was sent to all members of the department asking for volunteers. These men and dogs were trained daily until March 1, 1957. At that time, they were put on the street on Friday and Saturday nights, working the areas where crime was most prevalent. Shortly after this, actually on April 17, 1957~ Commissioner Hepbron, considering the experiment a success, went before the Mayor and City Council and appropriations were made through the Board of Estimates which resulted in the K-9 Corps becoming a permanent part of the Baltimore City Police. (NOTE - 1914 - Baltimore was using private dogs, one such dog, the first ever recorded was "Luxe" privately owned but protecting Baltimore's citizens through canine power) 
1956 - 30 December 1956 - K9 makes their first arrests, James Diggs, B/M 23. Major and Turk apprehend a suspect for breaking into a motor vehicle, and stealing contents. James Diggs, thought briefly about fleeing but quickly changed his mind while in the 400 Blk. of W. Franklin St. as he saw the sharp teeth, and fast legs of Turk, and Major Von-Gruntz (aka Major) Diggs changed his mind, giving the dogs their first arrest. The handlers at the time were Officers, Irvin Marders, William Kerbe, and Robert Johnson. Diggs was sentenced to 30 days, in Central Court for theft from a parked Motor Vehicle. 
1957 - 9 October 1957 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John F. Andrews
1958 - 19 September 1958 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert K. Nelson
1958/59 - Southeastern District History - 1958/59 - The Southeastern District is the youngest of all of our districts, it was first built in 1958/59 at its present location of 5710 Eastern Ave 
1959 - 11 January 1959 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard H. Duvall, Jr.
1959 - Baltimore's Park Police would disband, most members go to Baltimore Police Department where they retained their rank, their time, and their pension. Originally founded in 1862 to cover parks that fell outside Baltimore Police Jurisdiction. 
1960 - January 1960 - Baltimore Police along with Maryland State Police would introduce the Breathalyzer into Maryland's fight against Drunk Driving. It would be used up until 1993 when it was replaced with the a unit called "The Intoximeter". 
1960 - 16 November 1960 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Warren V. Eckert 
1961 - In January of 1961, the Baltimore Police Department merged with The Park Police, to make one big police force that covered the city. This will happen numerous times throughout the department's history. Housing Police and now talks of taking on Baltimore School Police.  
1961 - Bernard Schmidt, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1961-1966 
1961 - 8 May 1961 - Baltimore police starts it's Meter Maid unit, They will work out of the traffic division of the baltimore Police Department with 10 Meter Maids, under the direction of one Sergeant and one Lieutenant. 
1961/66 - The police commissioner was in an elevator in the Headquarters building when an officer steps in, the officer turns his back on the Commissioner and faces the closing doors much the way anyone entering an elevator would. The Commissioner asked the officer if he knew who he was. The Officer apologized, saying he did not. The Commissioner introduced himself to the officer. Not long after this the tradition of a photo of the Police Commissioner hanging in the roll call room behind the Lieutenant's podium was begun. The Commissioner at the time was, Bernard Schmidt he served as Police Commissioner from 1961-1966 just before Donald Pomerleau - 1966-1981 
1962 - 7 April, 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry Smith, Jr.
1962 - 26 May 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard D. Seebo
1962 - 2 July 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edward J. Kowalewski
1964 - 10 January 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Francis R. Stransky
1964 - 6 February 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Claude J. Profili
1964 - 11 September 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Walter Patrick Matthys 
1964 - 15 October 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Teddy L. Bafford
1964 - 25 December 1964 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Jack Lee Cooper
1965 - 20 January 1965 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles R. Ernest
1965 - 17 June 1965 - Baltimore Police begins it Cadet Program, the first Cadet was Edmund Bossle. 
1965 - 22 July 1965 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert Henry Kuhn
1966 - 29 April 1966 - The Nameplate was first worn by City Police Officers on 29 April 1966 at 9 am. - In a program called "Know Your Police,' which was initiated by Interim Police Commissioner George M. Gelston in which he ordered all officers to begin wearing a nameplate for identification purposes. An idea the Maryland State Police started 7 years earlier to the same day (29 April, 1959). At the time Commissioner Gelston felt it would improve the image of the police department. As a side note, Patrolman Edward Campbell would be the first City Officer to wear such name plate as he posed for the Baltimore Sun a day earlier on 28 April 1966. I should add Officer Tom Wade posed for a similar picture in which Commissioner Gelston was seen pinning his nameplate on him.
1966 - 24 August 1946 - We lost our Brother Honorary Police Officer Simon Fried * 1* 
1966 - The department itself had not fully integrated until 1966. Prior to 1966, African American officers were limited to foot patrols as they were barred from the use of squad cars. These officers were quarantined in rank, barred from patrolling in white neighborhoods, and would often only be given specialty assignments in positions in the Narcotics division or as undercover plainclothes officers.
1966 - Police Commissioner Donald D Pomerleau was appointed to the first of three six year terms as our Commissioner, that's 18 years of the same Police Commissioner
1966 - Along with Commissioner Pomerleau came the idea of "Police, Policing... Police", Internal Affairs, Internal Investigations, IID... IAD... call it what you like, but DP said, "Things will change, you may have been on the take yesterday, but you will not be on the take tomorrow, and if you are, you will be arrested just like any other criminal in Baltimore!"  Some officers were smart and yielded to his advice, others were not so smart and ended up someplace alright, "That place was; their place in a perp walk 1966 style". 
1966 - In May of 1966 Inspirational Services Division was initiated
1966 - The FOP Lodge #3 Baltimore City Police was founded by Sgt. Richard Simmons, Earl Kratch and several others. 
1966 - Was the first year that we had what is known today as "In-service training" — where time is taken off the street to learn about things like, new laws, rules and regulations, and other new techniques, equipment and operations with-in the department.
1966 - Donald Pomerleau, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1966-1981 
1967In August of 1967 the Fleet Safety Program was initiated
1967 - The “Operations Unit” was formed, some called them “Flex Squads”. These special units one in each of the nine districts would go where the action is. “Operations Units” the special groups for each be commanded by Lieutenant, who will deploy the men as they are needed throughout the district. 
1967 - February 1967, the Baltimore Police Department instituted a tuition reimbursement program for personnel pursuing college degrees
1967 - June 22, 1967, the Public Information Division was formed. The Division consisted of a Director, two full time police officers and two civilian stenographers. The duties of the Director and his staff consisted of preparing and disseminating all news information and releases to the news media and the public. Preparation of the Annual Report as required by law and the bi-weekly Newsletter are part of the responsibilities of this Division
1967 - July 1967, one of the four Community Relations Store Front Operations was implemented. The purpose of these centers is to reach the community on an intimate basis. This was the first such project in the Northeastern region of the United States.
1967 - 25 January 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Baumer 
1967 - 10 February 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frederick K. Kontner
1967 - 21 August 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John C. Williams
1967 - Baltimore Police opens it's first "Safety City" to teach kids how to safely cross streets 
1967 - Baltimore Police switches from SA 7-1200 to contact police in the event of an emergency to dialing 222.3333 this would remain in use until 1985 when the 911 system was implemented  
1968 - Due to the number of auto accidents involving patrol vehicles, Police Commissioner Donald Pomerleau decided to remove Sirens from two-thirds of the department’s fleet. This action was frowned upon by City Hall, and the MVA. The MVA pointed out that it was illegal still it would take years for the commissioner to reverse his decision. 
1968 - 18 April 1968 - We lost our Brother Detective Richard F. Bosak
1968 -  We lost our Brother Sergeant Frant Ankrom *
1967/68 - Was the last year for the Rocker style shoulder patch. (Baltimore wore a single shoulder patch on their left arm) Was the first year for the Blue Baltimore "City" Police style shoulder patch. (At this stage Baltimore was still wearing a single shoulder patch on their left arm.) 
1968 – As a National First – Baltimore Police Department begins In-service training - The education and training program expanded beyond the traditional entrance level training for recruits to a forty hour annual In-Service Training course attended by all personnel from the rank of Patrolman through Captain
1968 - September 1968 - The department of education and training center, itself relatively new, evolve into a modern version of the Baltimore police academy and became the first fully accredited academy of its type in the country.  The American University in Washington recognized portions of the training program and offered up to 12 credits for completion of specified courses in a program that combined 14 weeks of classroom work, and 6 weeks of Field Training. Three of the credits could be earned at Morgan State University. The course for credit function was later transferred to the University of Baltimore, where it has remained. From time to time officers are sent to the FBI National Academy at Quantico Virginia for courses.
1968 - 16 May 1968, the department installed a National Crime Information Center (NCIC) terminal permitting direct access to the storehouse of information on wanted persons, stolen vehicles, stolen weapons, and identifiable stolen property at the Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters in Washington, D. C. This system enables inquiries from officer• on patrol to be answered within seconds. 
1968 - 23 September 1968, The department officially took possession of its IBM System 360 computer
1968 - 4 November 1968, - As a National First – Baltimore Police Department begins In-service training - The education and training program expanded beyond the traditional entrance level training for recruits to a forty hour annual In-Service Training course attended by all personnel from the rank of Patrolman through Captain - Forty Hour In-Service Training course, designed to indoctrinate our police officers in the latest developments and technique in professional law enforcement.. The concept of In-Service Training demonstrates the department’s goal in development of an officer's capabilities to function amid the complexities of an ever changing society. This coupled with Roll Call training keeps our Officers up to date, on the most current of police procedures. 
1969 - In May of 1969, we have our first father/daughter on police department. Officer James F. Stevens and Police woman Patricia A. Loveless
1969 - 20 June 1969 - We lost our Brother William Wilder
1969 - In October of 1969, we have our first female officer honored by the Criminal Justice Commission. Police Woman Mercedes Rankin
1969 - 10 October 1969 - Lt. Dennis P. Mello is promoted, making him Baltimore Police Department's first African American Captain, a new rank, and new position, which he took at Baltimore's Western Police District.
1970 - 16 January 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George F. Heim
1970 - 24 March 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry M. Mickey
1970 - 24 April 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Donald W. Sager
1970 The Arson Unit was initiated in February of 1970. 
1970 - Fox Trot Est. The Department Aviation Unit "Fox Trot" was officially formed and began flights.
1970 - 1970 - 1 July 1970 Baltimore Police went to an all Blue light emergency signaling system on their patrol cars and emergency vehicles. Twenty-four years later on 28 May 1994, with a new car design, the department did away with the solo blue lights and went back to the traditional red and blue lights.
1970 - Aug 1970 - Police Cars are De-Flagged - If you have ever wondered why Baltimore Police cars lack the American Flag, it goes back to Aug 1970 when Police Commissioner Donald D. Pomerleau ordered the removal or all American flag insignias from Baltimore city police cars. The reason was said to be due to their wearing out quickly, becoming dull and looking torn and tattered. The Commissioner, however, did rule that city officers would be able to continue wearing American flag lapel pins on their uniforms. Note this light scheme would remain unchanged until the mid 90's)
1970 3 December 1970 - Police Commissioner Donald D. Pomerleau introduced the Department's first Police Flag... it has remained our flag since that time with no changes ever since... (BTW the flag cost $180 at the time, and now the same quality flag would cost more than $700 
1971 The Citation of Valor Baltimore Police Department's Purple Heart was started by Commissioner Donald Pomerleau in 1971 but awarded retroactively to 22 Sept 1966, to include those persons that could have received this award. Originally this was only awarded to those officers that have been shot in the line of duty, all other, line of duty injuries did not qualify; stabbings, razor blades, beat unconscious with a club, or ran down by an automobile, was not enough. If the officer wasn't shot he was not eligible for the Citation of Valor. Also, this was the first award that in our agency that was distributed directly from the Police Commissioner without any discussion with the Meritorious Conduct Board. At some point, it was realized that the sacrifices of our seriously injured officers had to be recognized and so the criteria was expanded to include stabbings, cuttings, or any injuries that could result in death or permanent disability while acting in their official capacity are eligible for this award.  
1971 - 12 June 1971 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Carl Peterson, Jr.
1971 - 3 August 1971 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Martin Webb
1971 - 26 March 1971 - Two Hughes 300-C helicopters were formally accepted and registered for the department. The two new helicopters raised to three the number of such craft available for tactical deployment in the department's continuing efforts to combat crime. Purchased under a Federal grant of $100, 000, the Hughes 300-C models represent a maximum combination of utility and modernization within the department's crime fighting efforts
1971 - In June of 1971 - We had our first K9 Dog killed in the Line of Duty. "Shane" RIP 
1971 - 27 July 1971 - the Community Relations and Youth Divisions were combined into a new division known as the Community Services Division. The creation of this division and the resulting centralization of Administrative functions provides an effective channel of communication between the Police Officer and the community he serves. The major thrust of our expanded Community Services function is aimed at our young people. It is the Division's job to keep clear the channel of communication between officers and the community. The accomplishment of this mission is aided by the division's two Summer Camp operations located at Camp Perkins and Camp Ritchie. Also, our Officer Friendly Program geared for its first full year of operation.
1971 - The department begins its Bomb Squad Unit under the supervision of Lt. Karner - Before starting our own Bomb Squad, bomb-dismantling missions were handled by Army experts. A member of this unit invented a device used to more safely detonate bombs. It was made from a shotgun shell, a design of his own design, made right here in Baltimore, and would eventually go on to be used worldwide (Another Baltimore First).
1971 - 30 September 1971 - The Cell Block and District Court closed after 12 years in operation. The courthouse and the 24 adjoining cell-blocks in the Northeast district building will be converted into a detention center for women and offenders under the age of 16. Replacement facility the new facility will replace the present women’s block and juvenile cells on Pine Street, which have been condemned. Note: The court closed without ceremony at the end of a typical day’s business, during which 18 Defendants faced 52 charges ranging from shoplifting to disorderly conduct, false pretense to indecent exposure and assault to violation of probation. The last case heard in the NE Court Room was against Donald F. Goetz, who was charged with burglarizing a house in the 1600 block of these Coldspring Lane. 
1971 - 22 October 1971 - The Charles D. Gaither (boat) is retired from the Police Department and starts a new career as a fire boat
1972 - 26 July 1972 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Lorenzo Arnest Gray
1972 - 1 March 1972 - The department initiated the experimental and innovative program of bicycle patrol. It was learned that the bicycle patrol possesses all of the advantages of foot patrol with an added advantage of mobility. Also, the use of the bicycle provided great potential for more citizen-police contact, a new dimension in establishing good community relations.
1972 - 1 April 1972 - This may sound like a joke but it’s real, and it works – On April Fool’s day 1972 came, Operation Identification was formally initiated by the department. The Operation, encourages citizens to mark their property with an electro-engraver and record the make and serial numbers on a property sheet supplied by the department.
1972 - 11 August 1972 - “Flex Squads”, the department began hiring sworn personnel to create 9 highly flexible Crime Control Teams. These federally funded five-man teams operated within the "total police officer" concept, performing all the activities and functions found within a law enforcement agency. The project's goal was to establish stability within the community based upon freedom from criminal activity and closer rapport between police and the citizen.
1972 - 30 August 1972  - To convert the department's mobile communications system to more versatile portable transceivers and to incorporate 450 MHZ channels. The portable transceivers greatly increase police service to the citizenry by reducing response time for emergency calls, by providing a uniform communications system for command personnel to direct personnel in emergency situations, and by promoting a more efficient and safer foot patrol coverage. The incorporation of 450MHZ channels created an even more efficient communications ay1tem by allowing more practical frequency allocations.
1972 - The present Headquarters Building of the Police Department was opened.
1972 - Baltimore Police Department's Honor Guard is formed
1972 - 8 March 1972 - The Baltimore Police Bike Patrol is started for a second time
1972 - In November of 1972 - The  Baltimore Police Museum is opened in the lobby of Headquarters
1973 - 1 December 1973 - We lost our Brother Detective Wiley M. Owens 
1973 - 29 March 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert M. Hurley
1973 - 6 April 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Norman Frederick Buchman
1973 - 22 September 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Calvin M. Rodwell
1973 - 11 June 1973 - The Civil Service Commission authorized the single classification of "Police Officer" to replace the dual designation "Policeman/Patrolman" and "Policewoman/Patrolwoman". This reclassification was a continuation of the department's efforts in the area of equal employment opportunity. (Female "Police Officers" now had the same prerogatives and responsibilities as their male counterparts. Now only one competitive test for promotions is necessary. Thus, a single career ladder was established for all sworn members.) 
1973 - 12 July 1973 -  Unlimited Medical - It provided that all employees, both civilian and sworn, who entered on duty prior to 16 July 1973, were entitled to sick leave benefits in keeping with the existing Baltimore Police Department’s policy of unlimited sick leave. All civilian employees hired after this· date were entitled to one day of sick leave for each month of completed 1ervice. A maximum of 150 days could be accumulated. If the employee so desired, one of each four unused sick leave days (maximum 3 day1) accumulated during each year could be converted to cash.
1973 - 23 October 1973 - The Evidence Control Unit became the central evidence repository within the department. This unit has the sole responsibility for safeguarding, accounting for, and disposing of non-departmental property which has come into the department's custody.
1974 - 5 May 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frank Warren Whitby, Jr. 
1974 - 1 August 1974 - We lost our Brother Detective Sergeant Frank William Grunder, Jr.
1974 - 15 August 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Milton I. Spell
1974 - 10 December 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Martin Joseph Greiner
1974 - Baltimore's first Gun Buyback program (then called a Gun Bounty) was held 25 August 1974. The idea came to Police Commissioner Pomerleau as he stood graveside to Officer Milton Spell who was shot and killed in the line of duty on 15 August 1974. PC Pomerleau offered $30 for surrendered guns. The surprisingly huge response, more like a metallic flood, to the Commissioner's offer for guns was an indication of how many weapons were and still are at large in the community, each with its crime and possible death potential. Budget considerations rather quickly have required the Police Department to eliminate rifles and shotguns from its bounty program and to limit its offer to city residents.  The program would last nearly a month - The city Gun Bounty program (as it was known) was being declared a success by police spokesmen, but criminologists challenge that appraisal because the program has not been in effect long enough to produce solid evidence, and they insisted that only strong federal gun control measures can significantly limit the availability of firearms. There have been a number of gun bounty, buyback programs since, some sponsored by the Baltimore Housing Authority, The Police Department, Area Churches, and the Occasionally Private Individual/Politician. A buyback in West Baltimore once recovered 750 guns in one day, and another in June of 2005 recovered hundreds more along with several high-powered assault weapons." If only the city would have been more proactive instead of reactive, we might not have had as many police funerals to attend. 
1974 - 23 March 1974 - House panel passes, "Law Enforcement Officer Bill of Rights" In 1974, Maryland became the first state in the nation to enact a “law enforcement officers' bill of rights.” 
1974 - Baltimore's Police Strike 11 July 1974 began a formal strike, after a 7 July campaign of intentional misbehavior and silliness, the strike would last four days ending on 15 July when union officials negotiated an end to the strike when the city promised (and delivered) police officers a wage increase in 1975, but refused amnesty for the strikers. 
1974 - May 1974 – Field Training was initiated, considered an innovative change in the training format by the department. After 11 weeks of recruit training probationary officers were assigned to a Field Training Officer. The FTO's, specially selected experienced patrol officers, trained and evaluated the recruit officer. This new training format effectively blended field training with classroom instruction 
1974 - In the latter part of 1974, a study of the various types of bullet resistant body armor began. The culmination of an exhaustive testing program and the Federal Grant process was the issuance in January, 1976 to all sworn personnel, of a vest made from Kevlar 29, a synthetic cloth-like fiber stronger and lighter than ballistic nylon and steel mesh. The vest will atop the penetration of the most common types of weapons and ammunition found on the street today. 
1974/75 The Departmental Vehicle phased out the old Blue and White with the old Gold Badge on the door to an all-white car with a Blue Shoulder Patch on the door and Red under Blue Stripes. 
1974/75 - Under Commissioner Donald D. Pomerleau the Word "City" was dropped from our large blue shoulder patch. (There are several interesting versions as to why the word "CITY" was drop. All were based on the same 
1974/75 - Ammo change, after one of our brother Officers (Lorenzo Gray) was killed in the line of duty (1972) the department was forced to changed our ammo from the round nose to the semi-wad cutter. (This change came about because Officer Gray's shot merely spun the suspect around allowing him to discharge a round from his shotgun at Officer Gray. Officers wanted something they knew would save them if they needed it, and requested the hollow point, the department rejected that idea, stating they felt it was, dare I say "Overkill") the Wad cutter wasn't issued until late 1974, early 75.) We were recently told this change was a big part of negotiations that lead to the 1974 Police Strike. (BTW while the city and the Department were not happy with the strike, my family and present law enforcement is thankful. The changes made as a result of those strikes made things better for all of us today, our department fired some great men and women; men and women that made a sacrifice for us. 
1975 - January of 1975, our Quick Response Teams were formed. Quick Response Team members are specially trained to handle the most vexing and complex situations confronting law enforcement officers. Their primary objectiveis to conclude a situation without injury to anyone.
1975 - 1 August 1975, the department began the implementation of its on-line booking system. Display units, located at the various districts, were linked to the department's computerized criminal history files and provided the booking districts prior criminal histories of recidivist arrestees.
1975 - 19 September 1975, the department in cooperation with the State's Attorney's Office and various taxicab companies became part of the "Civilian Radio Taxi Patrol" in an effort to increase police service to the citizens of Baltimore. If, while on duty, a cab driver, whose vehicle ii identified by a "Civilian Radio Taxi Patrol" shield on the right and left rear-quarter panels, obaerve1 anything demanding immediate police attention, he notifies his dispatcher, who in turn calls the Communication Division via a special Hotline. This program is another example of the department's efforts to involve the citizens of Baltimore in a united fight against crime. 
1975 - 4 June 1975 - In May of 1954 city Council proposed bullet proof vests for all of its police… Finally in 1975 city Police would get that protection as on 4 June, 1975 City government authorized a $288,379 expenditure for more than 3,000 Bullet-proof vests for Baltimore's police officers. Baltimore was 2nd in the nation to receive vests for all of its officers, behind San Francisco - Vests would actually be issued 1 January 1976 three stories, all convincing, well for the most part convincing, see the Patch page under BPD History) 
1975 - 13 September 1975 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edward S. Sherman
1975 - 27 October 1975 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Timothy B. Ridenour
1975 - 25 June 1975 - Police Agent Lynn A. Allison becomes the department's first female Police Agent
1975 - September of 1975 The Gunpowder Range is opened to the Baltimore Police Department for training purposes 
1976 - 4 April 1976 - the 5th. Issue badge came along and is the Badge currently worn by Baltimore Police Officers to this day. With exception to the 2nd Issue badge, the word Baltimore did not appear on any other official Police badge. The 5th Issue badge is similar to the 4th Issue "Supervisor's" badge with a new center seal that is the same as worn on the large shoulder patch. 
1976 - 16 April 1976 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jimmy Dale Halcomb
1976 - In April of 1976 the Youth Division of Baltimore Police was implemented
1976 - August 1976 Mounted Section was given a mascot named Preakness by the President of the Maryland Jockeys Club Mr. Herman Cole Rookie was the mascot for the prior 10 years
1976 - 15 July 1976 - Baltimore has some of its first recorded academy class layoffs - effected were classes 76-2 and 76-3 both of which were eventually rehired by the department on 14 January, 1977 and 31 January, 1977. Class 76-2 had 29 of the 34 come back and 76-3 had 27 of the original 31 trainees come back 
1976 - In 1976 QRT (Quick Response Team) began training; it was formed out of members of Tactical Section including several of the EVU members as they had been trained in use of high power rifles and already departmental Marksmen. In the beginning, The "New" Tactical Section, circa 1975/76, formed a "Special Weapons and Tactics" team in the BPD. The department however wouldn't let it be called SWAT. They felt SWAT was a negative of term. So they (the team came up with the name QRT (Quick Response Team) Lt. Joe Key has been given credit for naming QRT, it is the exact same team, but with a kinder gentler name. When they finally obtained the body bunkers, and Kevlar helmets, they also purchased black ballistic face shields. However, the department didn't want members of the team wearing the masks because "it made them look evil". So the masks stayed in the box. By 1999, the department finally gave in and let the team be called SWAT. Up until this point EVU were the primary snipers for the city. The original members of that first QRT team each had to buy their own equipment; many shopped Sunny's Surplus, and or H&H Outdoor Supply. So when they see the teams of today, and how well they're equipped; being as it should have been all along, I'm sure all they can do is shake their heads? But at the same time, I know how proud each of these men are to have paved the way. Not to mention the number of lives they saved, while putting their own lives on the line. The G.O. authorizing QRT wasn’t signed until after Lt Joe Key left QRT in Oct. of 1977 
1977 - 9 March 1977 - the Auxiliary Police Unit was formed within the Community Services Division. After training and certification, members were assigned, without compensation, to support the force. . They are assigned to various events as an addition to the normal manpower deployment.
1977 - 9 to 12 September 1977 - The new Central District/Youth Section/Women's Detention Center Complex was completed located at 500 E Baltimore St opens. Moving from the Fallsway and Fayette St. building, built in 1926, to the 500 E. Fayette St. location where it currently stands.
1977 - 20 December 1977 - The Colonel, as Chief of Patrol, was alreadyhighest-rankingnking black officer in the history of the Baltimore Police Department. His new title will be Deputy Commissioner of the Services Division, one of three Deputy Commissioners. The Deputy Commissioner rank immediately under the Commissioner, the next step for this man is Commissioner and that would happen in 1984 making him not only the first Black Deputy Commissioner but also the first Black Commissioner of the Baltimore Police Department.
1978 - 15 February 1978 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edgar J. Rumpf
1978 - 23 April 1978 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Robert John Barlow
1978 - 27 October 1978 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Nelson F. Bell, Jr.
1978 - 23 June 1978 - Police Memorial was dedicated at the Shot tower on the corner of President and Fayette. It was rededicated with Statues, lighting and flags added in 1999 
1978 - 24 October 1978 - Baltimore Police promoted the First Woman Police Major, Lt. Patricia Mullen, elevated two grades as she became Major Patricia Mullen. Promoted from Lieutenant of the Homicide Unit, Major Mullen was put in charge of Youth Section. 
1978 - The Baltimore City Police Department remained under State governance until 1978, when the Mayor began to appoint the Police Commissioner, subject to confirmation by the City Council (Chapter 920, Acts of 1976). - From the MSP website Baltimore City Police Force. The first State agency to exercise police powers was the Baltimore City Police Force. Established in 1867 under a Board of Police Commissioners, the Force was elected by the General Assembly (Chapter 367, Acts of 1867). Baltimore had been developing a police force since the formation in 1784 of a night watch "very necessary to prevent fires, burglaries, and other outrages and disorders" (Chapter 69, Acts of 1784). Its police force, from 1867, was governed by a State board although jurisdiction was limited to the City. From 1900 to 1920, the Board of Police Commissioners was appointed by the Governor. After 1920, a single Police Commissioner of Baltimore City was chosen and also served on the Governor's Advisory Council. The Baltimore City Police Department remained under State governance until 1978, when the Mayor began to appoint the Police Commissioner, subject to confirmation by the City Council (Chapter 920, Acts of 1976). In 1909, the Board of Police Commissioners of Baltimore City urged the creation of a State detective force since the Governor, the Fire Marshal, and State's Attorneys in the counties frequently sought help from Baltimore City's expert investigators. The first tentative step towards a state-wide police force, however, was taken in 1914 as a corps of motorcycle officers under the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles began to enforce motor vehicle laws throughout Maryland (Chapter 564, Acts of 1914)
1978 - 23 June 1978, The Shot Tower Park and Police Memorial were dedicated. In addition to the Memorial Trees surrounding the area, an appropriate plaque is prominently displayed on a granite stone with the inscription: "This living memorial is dedicated by the Department to all members, past and present, who have served with honor, dedication, and loyalty, many of whom have made the supreme sacrifice." 
1978 - 2 October 1978 - A long time goal of the Department's Education and Training Division was realized with the opening of a library specializing in law enforcement material. The facility provides entrance level sworn personnel in the E&T Center with a location to study, apply required research work and exposure to supplemental text material, and offers other personnel many unique features to meet a number of scholarship needs.
1979 - The Video Production Unit of the Education and Training Division began producing and distributing Video Taped Roll Call Training productions designed to carry specific training messages to the Department's Officers.
1979 - 2 March 1979 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John H. Spencer 
1979 - 7 April 1979 - Police Officer Michael P. Dunn was the first City officer to be saved by his Kevlar vest after being shot in the chest.
1979 - 19 August 1979 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William D. Albers
1981 - 20 July 1981 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Ronald L. Tracey
1981 - 5 August 1981 - The original five digit sequence numbers were assigned alphabetically. The lower the number, the lower in the alphabet your last name. The numbers were often re-issued after an officer left the department. The "new" Short Number, sequence number system began late in 1981. The change came about from a district court requirement for a unique number to identify officers.  
1981 - Frank Battaglia, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1981-1984
1982 - 11 January 1982 - The department began it's Telephone Reporting system telephone reporting unit, police will not argue with citizens who specifically request police service. According to Dennis Hill, the Police Emergency Number, 222·3333, will remain the same. If a person calls this number and requests a patrol car, one will be sent within an average of six minutes.
1982 -20 January 1982 - The Baltimore Police Department work side by side and hand in hand with the Checker Cab Company on a project to form the TOP - Taxi On Patrol program. What began here in Baltimore went on to become a national program, to report and solve crimes all over the country
1982 - 1982, Kathy Adams became the first female member of QRT (Baltimore's SWAT Team)
1983 - 15 January 1983 - The First Woman Promoted to District Commander - Major Bessie R Norris, was promoted to Major and assumed her duties as Commander of the Southwestern District 
1983 - June of 1983 the department initiates it's Hostage Negotiation Team (HNT)
1983 - 30 July 1983 - The first female K9 officer is assigned. Officer Charlene M. Jenkins is handler to Max
1984 - 3 December 1984 - We lost our Brother Detective Marcellus Ward
1984 - The Latent Print Unit began the use of Printrak. Printrak enabled the department to use computerized fingerprint searches to assist examiners with respondents for potential latent print identifications. 
1984 - Bishop Robinson, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1984-1987
1985 - 1 March 1985 - Baltimore City Police officially begins it's 911 emergency call number, a program that was in the works since the first call came in at 11:36 am from someone that had locked their keys their car. Prior to 911 emergency calls went into 222-3333 and non-emergency calls went into 396-1111 
1985 - 6 March 1985 a senior at Johns Hopkins University, by the name of Michael Patrick Sullivan, 22 years of age at the time, a resident in the 300 Blk. of East University Parkway, was arrested for making a false report to Baltimore Police Department’s newly formed 911 Emergency Call Center. This made him the first person arrested on the charge since the inception of said, Emergency Call Number. Baltimore’s 911 system went into effect just 6 days earlier, after the inception of the system on 1 march 1985. 
1985 - 8 October 1985 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard J. Lear 
1985 - 18 November 1985 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo 
1985 - Adopted a computerized booking procedures for prisoners, and 911 emergency systems
1986 - 21 July 1986 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard Thomas Miller 
1986 - 20 September 1986 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert Alexander
1987 - Edward J. Tilghman, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1987-1989 
1987 - 24 October 1987 - Baltimore Public Housing Projects were patrolled by "Baltimore Housing Authority Police" a police agency that was State funded and took over private security in the projects of Baltimore city, it initially was patrolled by 15 officers and 6 supervisors.  Part of REACT (Responsible Enforcement and Aggressive Community Training) officers, which was designed to eliminate drug trafficking at the 53 public housing projects. These officers trained with City Police, under Maryland training Commission guidelines. 
1989 - 10 October 1989 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Martin 
1989 - Edward V. Woods, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1989-1993 
1990 - 7 Feb 1990 - Random Drug tests are began, the first 59 members of the department tested were Commissioner Edward V woods, and his 58 member command staff. A week later Officers were randomly called into the medical section for urine tests. - Woods ordered a study of the idea after he took over the top job at the Police Department last July. "We've had drug testing for cause and tested applicants in the past," said police spokesman Dennis Hill. "This represents the first [time] everybody will be randomly tested." Seven officers were charged criminally, suspended from duty or stripped of their police powers in the year prior to these tests because of allegations of drug involvement.   
1990 - In 1990 the range switched from the NRA-B27 target to the FBI-Q target. The reason stated at the time was that the NRA-B27 was a silhouette target, a black figure of a man with a white background, while the FBI-Q was a grey, and white target; some describe as a bottle, or bowling pin. There were two justifications for the switch, one was that some felt we were training to shoot black men, and that the FBI-Q target being grey, and white eliminated any misrepresentation of race. The other reason for the switch was the size of the targets, and that had a twofold justification. One the Q target was smaller which would improve our accuracy in shooting; the other was that the smaller targets cost half as much, which significantly reduced budget, and operating cost at the range. In any case it was a move that had to be made. There will be photos of the two targets elsewhere on this site.  
1990 - 1 Aug 1990 - One of our horses in the line of duty - "Sox" was a 14-year-old gelding bent down to nibble some grass on Federal Hill and got his right foot caught in the reins. This caused the horse to become excited and trip, falling down the hill to the street below, breaking the horses back in the fall. 
1990 The Department begins phasing in the Glock model 17 - 9mm semi-auto handgun, to replace the S&W model 19 / model 64 - .38 cal. pistol. This transition took approximately 3 years to complete.  (The first academy class to use the Glock's were 90-2 and 90-3)
1991 - Gunshot Residue Analysis (GSR) using Scanning Electron Microscopy began in 1991. 
1992 - The Baltimore Police Department re-initiated their Bicycle unit, a unit that was brought back after nearly 20 years as it was formerly used in 1972 and even as many as 70 or more years earlier. 
1992 - 21 September 1992 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Ira Neil Weiner
1993 - 26 May 1993 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Herman A. Jones, Sr. 
1993 - The Breathalyzer was replaced with a computerized version, a unit called "The Intoximeter". 
1994 - Construction was due to begin construction on the Police Annex Building in October and complete by late 1996. In 2007 it would be renamed after former Police Commissioner Bishop L. Robinson. 
1994 - 28 May 1994, While awaiting their identifying marks Baltimore Police cruisers hit the street with no decals, and unlike the previous 24 years of Baltimore Police cars, these would feature both red and blue lights, as in July of 1970 Police vehicles started using only blue emergency lights. In 1994 however as they got rid of the Ford Taurus' and brought in 162 new Chevy Caprice Police cars all white, with light bars, but no decals we also started a new era in BPD Light-bars, now with both Red and Blue lights.
1994 4 Aug 1994 - Police Horse dies in the line of duty. The 14·year-old American quarter horse named "Bozman" died in the line of duty as his rider was thrown during a chase and Bozman ran into a parked car causing injury that had him die on the scene. 
1994 - 16 November 1994 - The department ended authorized use of the Slap Jack
1994 - The Polygraph Unit began using a computerized polygraph instrument for conducting polygraph examinations. 
1994 - 7 April 1994 - SCAN (Scientific Content ANaylysis) was brought to Central District's Major Crime Unit. SCAN was a Linguistic Polygraph technique that at the time was so new the department refused to pay for the course. Within a few years of Officer Driscoll showing it to different units throughout the department he was allowed to use it to analyze statements in just about every unit or division within the department; everything from Homicide, to Sex Offence, to Robbery, Missing persons and Theft units in the department. He started being limited to "Area 1", and before long doing all three Areas, Statements for the State’s Attorney’s Office, and various outside agencies. Before leaving department in 2001, for a surgery due to a LOD injury Det. Driscoll was asked to teach his introductory course to Baltimore's Homicide Unit. BTW His course was authorized by Avinoam Sapir, from LSI. Avinoam Sapir developed and refined Statement Analysis, and because Det. Driscoll took it so serious and found several observations that had not yet been discovered, Avinoam called him a Guru on the subject. "Point of Perspective" - "Here" vs. "There" was just one of Kenny's many observations that were eventually included LSI's training after Kenny brought it to Mr. Sapir’s attention. Kenny still uses the technique and practices reading statements even though he has been retired for more than 12 years. One of the more known cases he was involved in was the Laci Peterson case, in which he contacted the Modesto, California Police and offered his assistance, providing an observation on Scott Peterson's words. These observations came within 5 days of Laci’s going missing. Based on something Scott said to the media about his wife's disappearance, Kenny knew she was dead, and not missing as Scott was reporting. To Det. Driscoll it was pretty easy if Scott Peterson knew she was dead, when everyone else only suspected her as missing, then he must have killed her. At the time The Modesto, California Police said it was too early, they didn’t want to accuse him of anything too early. But within the year they asked Ret. Det. Driscoll for a complete write up of his observations. Kenny was able to tell them what room she was killed in, and what time she was killed, all based on Scott Peterson’s words. With-in a year Laci’s Body was recovered, and Scott Peterson was arrested, tried and convicted for her murder. Other cases he assisted with included Haleigh Cummings, in which police were told to look more closely at the girlfriend, a few years later, it was determined the girl was taken from the girlfriend over money she may have owed them for drugs. The technique is very strong in the right hands, and has been used to solve many cases throughout this country and internationally
1994 - Thomas C. Frazier, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1994-1999
1994 - June 8, 1994 - Juan Rodriguez and Linda Rodriquez became the first husband and wife to be promoted to the rank of Sergeant on the same day in the history of the Baltimore City Police Department. 
1994/95 - The City had Officers wearing, dark blue pants, white shirts, a black ties, with a dark blue blouse (jacket) and black shoes. They also had us carrying a briefcase. The idea was our Brass wanted us looking professional, more like businessmen. In 1994, the finally let us start wearing dark blue shirts that matched the pants. 
1994 - 14 October 1994 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Richard Harris 
1995 - April 1991 - Regional Auto Theft Task-force - Having your car stolen off the streets of Baltimore in the 1990s was far from unusual. Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Maryland State Police knew something had to change, they joined forces and formed RATT (Regional Auto Theft Task-force) y 2005 they cut auto-thefts in Baltimore by 50%. 
1995 - 28 November 1995 CBIF Central Booking Intake Facility opens closing down cell-blocks all over the city. Moving court from the districts to East side court was the first step in taking prisoners out of the districts.
1995 - Under Police Commissioner Thomas Frasier comes another of Baltimore's many shoulder patch changes, Up until 1995 our Officers either wore no patch, a single rocker patch, or one of the two "City" "No City" Patches on their left shoulder. Commissioner Frasier changed that when he ordered patches be worn on both shoulders. The story behind the change is almost as bazaar as the stories for the dropping of the word "City" from the patch in 1977. You can find the story) 
1995/96 - There was another change to the uniform, Officers started wearing dark blue shirts to match their dark blue pants. This was a welcome addition to the midnight officers as it helped them sneaking around the streets and alleys. (It helped distinguish rank and didn't get as dirty as fast, your average municipal police officer will have someone resist arrest two to three times a week, this makes for a dirty uniform shirt- Another note about the Baltimore Police Officer Uniform, it was designed to look like a businessmen, a nice blouse, white shirt tie and pants, they even issued a brief case so we looked professional.) 
1996 - The Mobile Unit began using CAD aided design programs to do computerized crime scene sketches. 
1996 - The Identikit sketches were replaced with a computerized version called E-Fit.  E-Fit was adopted by the department because it could be used on any computer by the investigating Detective, to more quickly obtain a sketch of the suspect. 
1996 - Baltimore Police Officers lose their Espantoon when it was replaced with the Koga Baton in Mid-August of 1996. According to an 11 August 1996 Sun report, Peter Herman reports this change explaining in detail, Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier thoughts, and reasoning for the change. That report can be found in an article entitled, "Police Get Rid of an Old Weapon - Baton Training Aims to Supplant use of Traditional Nightstick" on the Espantoon page of this website. 
1996 - August 1996 - The Baltimore Police Department became the first ever with a non-emergency 311 system. - If the pilot program worked, the number would be used in other cities to offer residents an alternative way of getting assistance from their local police without tying up lines designed to quickly handle life-threatening emergency situations. The initial news reports began in July of 1996 and the program went into testing by August of the same year. 
1997 - Less Lethal Bean Bag rounds were issued Remington 870 green handle shotguns were being used with a less lethal bean bag round.
1997 - 7 May 1997 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Owen Eugene Sweeney, Jr.
1998 - 30 October 1998 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Harold Jerome Carey
1998 - 4 November 1998 - We lost our Brother Flight Officer Barry Winston Wood
1997/98 - Headquarters had major improvements and modifications with the addition of the Annex Building.


2000 +

2000 - 8 March, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jamie Allen Roussey
2000 - 21 April, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Kevon Malik Gavin
2000 - 14 October, 2000 - We lost our Brother Sergeant John  David Platt
2000 - 14 October, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Kevin Joseph McCarthy
2000 - It was mentioned earlier that in 1996 Police Commissioner Thomas Frasier Banned the Espantoon, in 2000 Police Commissioner Edward Norris learned of our tradition and brought the Espantoon back. There were a lot of thankful police, to have had been given back one of our favorite tools. Many don't understand, the Espantoon wasn't so much for hitting suspects and is was not to have to hit them, it was also used in many arm-bar type holds, and the spinning/twirling of the Nightstick mentioned earlier, that spinning, kept distance between an officer and those that might try to get into their person space.
2000 - Ronald L. Daniel, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2000 - 2000
2000 - Edward Norris, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2000-2002
2001 - March 13, 2001 - We lost our Brother Agent Michael Joseph Cowdery, Jr.
2002 - 22 August, 2002 - We lost our Sister Police Officer Crystal Deneen Sheffield
2002 - 23 November, 2002 - We lost our Brother Detective Thomas G. Newman
2002- The Firearms Unit obtained a NIBIN system, which performs both fired cartridge cases and bullet comparisons as a part of a nationwide network. This is like NCIC and will let us know if a gun used in Baltimore to kill someone also matches a gun used in DC, LA or anywhere else in the US
2003 - The Annex building was re-named in dedication to Commissioner Bishop Robinson in 2003
2003 - Kevin Clark, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2003-2004
2004 - 3 July, 2004 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Brian Donte Winder
2004 - Leonard Hamm, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2004-2007
2005 - In 2005, the Housing Authority Police of Baltimore were disbanded and operations taken over by the Baltimore Police Department. Housing Authority officers, had to apply for jobs if they desired them with the city police. They were formerly working for the state so losing their time and seniority was assured from their previous employment with the Housing Authority Police of Baltimore City.
2006 - 19 May, 2006 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Anthony A. Byrd
2006 -
20 May 2006 - The Underwater Recovery Unit is official; it's fully equipped. On 7 December 2005 Sgt Kurt Roepcke of the Marine unit was able to start to process of getting it back up and running with help from Col. Scott Williams, and Sgt. George McClaskey; on this day 20 May 2006 the team was fully equipped and operational.
2006 - QRT (Quick Response Team) is renamed SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) after 32 years the department finally changes the name of this highly trained, elite team. (Initially in 1974 while forming the team the department was against using the name SWAT because they felt the name was too harsh for the department image. Political correctness circa 1974.)  During this time the Baltimore Police Department has had 38 Commissioners, starting in 1850 with Charles Howard, until 2012 with Anthony W. Batts. More info on our Commissioners can be found by - The above was altered from reports written by BPD's Public Affairs Office - Monday, March 17, 2008; 7:00 pm
2006 - In 2006, President George W. Bush signed the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA) bill. This new law allowed retired police officers to carry a firearm anywhere in the United States. As a result, a number of police departments around the country set up training programs for retired officers to be able to carry firearms.
2007 - 9 January, 2007 - We lost our Brother Detective Troy Lamont Chesley, Sr.
2007 - Frederick Bealefeld III, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2007-2012
2010 - 27 September, 2010 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James Earl Fowler, III
2010 - 16 October, 2010 - We lost our Brother Detective Brian Stevenson

2010 - 20 October, 2010 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas Russell "Tommy" Portz, Jr.
2011 - 9 January, 2011 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William Henry Torbit, Jr.
2011/2012 - X26 Taser - Baltimore Police are armed with Tasers - They issued the X26 Taser to some officers in 2011 and then all officers by 2012
2012 - 29 August, 2012 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Forrest "Dino" Taylor
2012 - Anthony W. Batts was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 2012-2015
2013 - 5 April 2013 - Retroactive "Citation of Valor" program is started and approved; Commissioner Batts listened to the concept submitted by Mrs. Patricia Driscoll, MD Adopt-a-Cop to allow disabled retired officers that were permanently disabled in the line of duty, to apply retroactively for the "Citation of Valor". This is done through Mrs. Driscoll’s Adopt a Cop program, and can be submitted to her either by the retired officer, another officer with information on the case, or the officer’s family. Mrs. Driscoll began working on this program back in 2004. After many attempts, and a lot of hard work; she finally got her program through. To date ten officers’ names have been submitted. Mrs. Driscoll is thankful to Commissioner Batts, Sgt Stephanie Lansey, and Officer Robert Brown. Anyone wishing to nominate an officer for this award can write Mrs Driscoll here at the site.
2013 - The Baltimore Police Department, goes from a six pack photo spread, in which the victim or witness of a crime is shown a photo spread containing six photos, one is the suspect, and five fill-in's, of similar looking males or females. The new concept would be to show six pictures as they did in the past, five fill-ins and the actual suspect in random order, but now one at a time. Prior to the 1980's when the six-pack photo spread was used, we used physical line-ups, in which we normally used the suspect and five fill in plain clothes officers, or civilians; so that the victim/witness' could make their pick. In the end does it really matter, if evidence points to the suspect, the victim/witness picks the suspect, be it through a physical line up, six-pack of photo’s, or individual photo’s, one guy in the line could be the guy. We never charge the guy they pick if the guy they pick is a fill-in and not our suspect. Still if it helps in anyway, to catch a crook and close a case. Then more power to them.
2013 - Baltimore Police begins its LEOSA program based on the following - Baltimore City FOP Lodge 3, Trustee Ed Wagner took it upon himself to convince the Baltimore Police Department to change course. He worked on implementing the program with Sam Walters, a member of the Baltimore Retired Police Benevolent Association (BRPBA) Board of Directors at the time, for 7 years, through several Police Commissioners. Baltimore City FOP Lodge 3 also committed to funding the start-up and equipment necessary to implement the LEOSA program. This is part of Baltimore Police History, great Job by members of both our FOP and our BRPBA
2014 - The Baltimore Police Department says it will begin to post a log of its investigations into serious use of force by officers online, and for the first time will ask the city's civilian review board to look at shootings involving its officers, and deaths of people in custody.

2014/2015 - The Baltimore Police Department is beginning there steps toward changing the logo on its marked patrol vehicles, the new design matches that of the new Fox Trot Helicopter unit, and several other departments within the department, such as the command unit, and  really rough S.W.A.T. truck. They are using both a White base, and a Black base. 
2015 - 2 January 2015 - Taking a page from the Baltimore City Police History Site, The Baltimore Police Department begins Tweeting memorials to our fallen brothers when they tweeted their first memorial Tweet "We will always remember Police Officers George D. Hart ‪#‎EOW‬ 01/02/25 & William A. Bell #EOW 01/02/32 ‪#‎BPDNeverForget‬" We hope this becomes a long lived tradition.
2015 - 9 January, 2015 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Craig Chandler
2015
- 11 January, 2015 - Baltimore City police are changing tactics in how they schedule officers work schedule. In an effort to make officers' jobs more efficient and city streets safer, offices, will work 4 days per week, 10 hour days.

2015 - January, 2015 - Officer will now wear, "Service Hashes" on their sleeve to indicate their years of service.

2015 - April an in-custody death of Freddie Grey caused civil unrest, and the arrest of 6 officers as a States Attorney and mayor circumvent the law in efforts to stop riotous protesters. This leads to a Mayor giving protesters room to destroy, ordering police to stand-down (or similar words that forced police to standby but not take action as bottles, bricks, and rocks were thrown at them, protesters shouted obscenities at them.
2015 - 30 May 2015 - There was a FaceBook page started to show support for police, and a Rally held on the 30th of May that had a turn out of about 200 to 250 people showing their support of police and maybe 15 to 20 police haters, chanting their hate for police and all things American - to see pics visit the
2015 - 5 June 2015 - Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday (5 June 2015) the creation of a new unit to oversee internal affairs, audits and the writing of police procedures, a move he hopes will strengthen public confidence in his agency. The unit us to be called the "Bureau of Professional Standards" and will be headed up by Deputy Commissioner Jeronimo "Jerry" Rodriguez 
2016 -
1 June 2026 – New Prisoner Transport Vehicles (PTV) were introduced. These new vehicles not only have the new color scheme of Black with a thick blue stripe, but they also come equipped with four cameras to film and record the actions of those being transported. A second new feature in these vans is a second side entrance to keep prisoners separate of one another, most commonly to separate the sexes, male and female, but also juvenile, or perhaps two people that were fighting and both are being arrested, in the old days we would have had to shut down two paddy wagons, now we can use one wagon to transport the two without fear of having to break up another fight on the way to CBIF or a medical facility  
2016 - 3 October 2016 - Police Officer's discipline hearing were held in public for the first time since the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring that such proceedings be open. So on that Monday [3 Oct 2016] Officer Alice Carson-Johnson's trial board was held with open doors.  
2016 30 November 2016 - The media (WMAR and FOX Baltimore) air the first body cam footage of a Baltimore Police Involved Shooting
2017 - 26 June 2017 - The Baltimore Police Museum is reopened after more than 20 years through the efforts of The Baltimore Police Historical Society, Det Robert Brown, and Ret Det Kenny Driscoll in cooperation with Commissioner Kevin Davis. It took 18 months from start to finish but it opened on the 26th of June 2017, complete with a 200 plus year history using photos, documents, uniforms, badges, guns, an original 1953 polygraph machine, district cell block, and other memorabilia. Guests can walk into the old cell block, stand in front of a physical lineup, and use their smartphones to hear, read and see more information by scanning our interactive QR codes which we have set up throughout the museum. We think the 360 QR codes will be a real treat as they allow visitors to use their phones to virtually pick up various items and turn them around to view them from 360 degrees. The museum is on the ground floor in the "Gallery" of the Bishop L. Robinson Sr. Police Administration Building 601 E Fayette St.. 

 

Baltimore City Police History
  Baltimore City Police https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU2bZGBdA4M&feature=youtu.be 39 Minutes of TerrorLOMBARD & CAREY Hail of sniper bullets in 1976 changed five lives forever. The incident forever changed the Baltimore Police Department One Officer dead four others shot and critically wounded A detailed account of the incident from official reports including the time ...
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Baltimore City Police History
  The Baltimore FloodIn 1868, The Jones Falls OverflowedCausing a Disaster Known as "Baltimore’s Black Friday Flood.” In 1868, the Jones Falls overflowed, a disaster now known as Baltimore’s “Black Friday Flood.” The flood, which is illustrated above on the cover of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, took 50 lives and caused millions of dollars in ...
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Baltimore City Police History
HISTORY of FOP LODGE #3 These are Old Brass Printers Plates for FOP Letterheads and Envelopes FOP Stamps Some background History on the FOP Logo The five-cornered star reminds us of the allegiance we owe to our Flag it is a symbol of the authority with which we are entrusted. It is an honor the people we serve bestow upon us. They place their confidence and trust in us to do the right thing, ...
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Baltimore City Police History
    Our PoliceRemembering Our Heroes  MOTTO OF THE DEPARTMENT  "EVER ON THE WATCH" CITATION OF VALORSworn members who have sustained gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or serious injury under aggravated and hostile circumstances which could result in death or permanent disability while acting in their official capacity are eligible for this ...
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Baltimore City Police History
  Baltimore City Police   Wagons in a Pinch Sun Paper Jun 29th 1949 BY FIRST HAND TESTIMONIAL, Baltimore’s new police wagons are vehicles in which their passengers are proud to ride. They are roomier, more fordable, faster, of smarter design and, in dozens of other ways, a world of improvement over the department's former free transportation fleet. The enthusiasm of the ...
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Baltimore City Police History
  Police History It is no secret that America inherited much of its governmental institutions from Great Britain. American law enforcement is no exception. British policing can be traced back to before the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The first Europeans who landed on our shores, found a strange and wondrous new land, inhabited by strange and wondrous people. The newcomers had ...
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Baltimore City Police History
    The Maryland Seal and the Baltimore Arms For The SunCOSMOS The Sun (1837-1987); Nov 1, 1880; pg. 6 The Maryland Seal and the Baltimore Arms In the Library of the City Hall you will find two electric types, one of which is called “The Seal of the State of Maryland” the other “The Coat of Arms of Lord Baltimore” and the ...
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Baltimore City Police History
Women and the Baltimore Police Department Timeline of some of Baltimore's Women in Law Enforcement In the 1915 BPD Rules and Regulations, a Policewomen's job was described as Rule 20 Page 48-49 Matrons of the Police Force (Policewomen) 1. Matrons of the Police Force (Policewomen), are conservators of the peace and members of the Force; they are amenable to the rules and regulations of ...
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