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Fallen Heroes Page 2

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EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Remembering Our Fallen Heroes
The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

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VINCENT J ADOLFO
12-W: 13
End of Watch: November 18, 1985
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Officer Adolfo was shot and killed, apprehending a suspect who had fled from a stolen car. His assailant Flint Gregory Hunt was later captured and returned to Baltimore. Hunt was tried, convicted, sentenced to death, and executed. At approximately 5:30 p.m., Monday, November 18, 1985, Eastern District Police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo’s attention was drawn to vehicle traveling eastbound on Biddle Street. A routine license tag check, via the Police Communications System, revealed that the vehicle was stolen. Noting that there were four occupants in the vehicle, he notified other Eastern District units of its location and direction. Two other marked units responded and began heading westbound on Biddle Street. All police vehicles activated their lights and sirens. The suspect’s vehicle slowed and the driver bailed out leaving the automobile in drive, which then collided head-on with a responding police cruiser. While one responding officer arrested the three suspect passengers, Officer Adolfo chased the driver north on a cluttered thoroughfare, called Iron Alley. He caught the suspect in the 1200 block of Iron Alley and attempted to place the man up against a wall. Officer Adolfo then attempted to place the suspect’s right hand behind him while the suspect grabbed a traffic sign pole for support. At this time, witnesses to the event state, the suspect pushed off the pole, turned and used his momentum to push Officer Adolfo off of his balance. As Officer Adolfo struggled to regain his balance, the suspect pulled a gun from his waistband and fired, striking Officer Adolfo in the chest. The officer staggered several feet and then fell face first onto the ground. Flint Gregory Hunt then stood over top of Officer Adolfo and ruthlessly fired a second round into his back. Officers still on scene with the other suspects and car, heard the gunshots and ran to the alley, only to find the 25 year old officer crumpled on the ground, mortally wounded. His fellow officers called a paramedic and began CPR. Officer Adolfo was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital only a few blocks away. The gunshot to his heart was so severe that Officer Adolfo was pronounced dead at 6:00 p.m., less than one half hour after he first saw the stolen vehicle. 

Flint Gregory Hunt was found hiding in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


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WILLIAM D ALBERS
41-E: 8
End of Watch: August 19, 1979
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Officer Albers had been working part-time at Johns Hopkins Hospital. In the early morning hours of the day a 34 year-old man entered the Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Room seeking psychiatric help. Since the man appeared to be in a highly emotional state, he was given a sedative and placed in nearby psychiatric care room. He slept while his wife and hospital staff completed arrangements for long-term care.

At about 10:15 a.m., the patient awoke and wandered into the hallway. A nurse confronted him, who instructed him to return to the room. Instead the man fell to the floor in a “spread eagle” position refusing to move. The nurse summoned the Hospital Security Staff to the scene. Officer Albers also responded. The Security Staff and Officer Albers picked the man up and carried him into the room and placed him onto the mattress. An injection was given to the patient and the Staff left the room to allow the sedative to take effect. As they filed from the room, Officer Albers remained momentarily to close the door. Before he could close the door, the man lunged at the officer and ripped the service revolver from its holster. The man fired a shot, which passed through Officer Albers arm and into his abdomen. A violent struggle ensued during which Officer Albers was shot four additional times. The sixth and final shot was fired and the suspect fell with a wound to the chest. Doctors and nurses worked heroically to save the lives of both men. The patient died in surgery. For nearly three weeks Officer Albers fought to live. Doctors performed several operations in an effort to repair several organs, fight infections and improve the chances for survival. Officer Albers succumbed to his injuries on August 19th.

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ROBERT ALEXANDER
1-W: 12
End of Watch: September 20, 1986
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
During the early morning hours on September 20, 1986, a citizen was traveling home from work. As he was stopped for a red light at Frederick and Boswell Avenues, his 1978 Dodge was struck in the rear by a pickup truck. They flagged down a motorist who offered help and said he would call police. Officer Robert Alexander of the Southwest District responded to the scene. He activated his overhead lights to provide a margin of safety for other motorist, hopefully alerting them to the accident at that location. Officer Alexander got out of his car and began to interview the other drivers. Suddenly, a 1985 Nissan pickup truck came around the curve, speeding towards them out of control. Officer Alexander pushed the citizens into a wooded area, out of the path of the oncoming truck, saving their lives and sacrificing his own. The truck crossed over the centerline, hitting the police car and then Officer Alexander. The truck then overturned and struck the other vehicles involved in the accident. The two drivers rushed to the aid of Officer Alexander, who just moments before had saved their lives. Another citizen traveling down Frederick Avenue saw the accident scene and ran to the patrol car to use the fallen officers radio to summon help. An off-duty officer, John W. Parrott, was driving by and saw the accident, stopped and used Officer Alexander’s radio to notify the dispatcher. Paramedics were already on route to care for the citizens involved in the initial accident and were there in seconds. Officer Alexander’s injuries were so severe that he died at the scene. The suspect was arrested on scene and charged with DWI, and vehicular manslaughter as well as a host of other charges. Officer Alexander was 22 years old, served as a Cadet, graduated in class 85-3, and had 9 months on the street.

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JOHN F ANDREWS
21-E: 9
End of Watch: October 9, 1957
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1957 we lost our brother Police Officer John F. Andrews to an auto accident based on the following:
On October 9, 1957 at approximately 9:50 a.m., Officer Andrews was pursuing a speeder in the 900 block of S. Monroe. Officer Andrews was on a motorcycle with all of his emergency equipment on traveling at approximately 70 to 75 miles per hour. As the officer was overtaking the speeder, the driver swerved in front of Officer Andrews, causing his motorcycle to jump the sidewalk and hit a cement wall. He was killed immediately. Officer Andrews served in the U.S. Navy from March 9, 1943 to February 5, 1946. He saw three years of combat in the Pacific.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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LEO BACON
40-E: 1
End of Watch: October 9, 1936
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 9 Oct 1936 we lost our brother Police Officer Leo Bacon to a surgery that came about due to a Line of Duty Injury that had occurred sometime earlier based on the following:
Drawn from correspondence between Commissioner Charles D. Gaither and the Law Offices of Hargest, LeViness, Duckett and McGlannan On February 26, 1932, Officer Bacon was injured when helping move a semaphore house through traffic at the intersection of Eutaw and Saratoga Streets. Officer Bacon was assigned to the Traffic Division and was on duty while directing this movement. During this incident, Officer Bacon received an injury to his kidneys. This injury continued to aggravate him and he finally went to a doctor. After some initial treatment for his injury, his injuries continued to disturb him and a diagnosis was made by Dr. A. J. Gillis of epididymitis (a medical condition characterized by discomfort or pain in of the epididymis) in the right side. Officer Bacon was also diagnosed with a stone in the left kidney severe enough to warrant surgery. Dr. Gillis believed that this was also related to the accident and injury sustained on February 26, 1932. This surgery resulted in death as a result of pneumonia on October 9, 1936. The Department awarded Line of Duty Death benefits to Mrs. Leo Bacon in January 1937.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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TEDDY L BAFFORD
25-E: 5
End of Watch: October 15, 1964
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Appointed: August 6, 1953
Assigned: Northwestern District
Date: October 15, 1964
Length of Service: 11 years, 2 months
Baltimore Sun Article Dated 10/16/1964 

A policeman was shot to death last night in the 3300 Block of Garrison Boulevard almost immediately after he reported an earlier shooting to Police Headquarters on a callbox. Patrolman Teddy L. Bafford, 33, of the Northwestern District, was shot about 10:30 p.m. and died en route to Sinai Hospital a few minutes later. Police apprehended three young men, one with a gunshot wound in his foot, within fifteen minutes. They were the same three Patrolman Bafford had reported as being wanted in connection with the shots fired at a couple down the block from the callbox. Patrolman Bafford was shot once in the back and once in the nose, according to hospital officials. Police and witnesses gave this account of the patrolman’s death: Patrolman Bafford, a 14-year veteran of the Police Department, had been in a restaurant in the middle of the 3300 Block of Garrison Boulevard when he heard a shooting… The policeman went outside to investigate and found the couple that said three men in a 1962 green sedan had fired them at. Patrolman Bafford went to the callbox at the corner of Garrison Boulevard and Liberty Heights Avenue and reported the shooting to Police Headquarters. He said that the three young men were riding in the car, one in the back seat. Emanuel Brown, an attendant for a filling station near the callbox corner, said he saw the policeman making the telephone report to Police Headquarters and then run suddenly south along Garrison Boulevard. “Then I heard three shots fire and ran out and saw the officer on the ground,” he said. Police swarmed the shooting scene and picked up three young men. Inspector Frank J. Battaglia said one had been shot in the foot but made it clear that Patrolman Bafford had not done the shooting. Patrolman Bafford left behind a pregnant wife and two children. Patrolman Bafford served in the U.S. Marines from March 1949 to March 1952, he saw combat in Korea and was discharged with the rank of Sergeant.

 
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THOMAS J BARLOW
52-E: 13
End of Watch: December 31, 1937
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this date 31 Dec 1937 in Baltimore Police History, we lost our brother Patrolman Thomas J. Barlow to an automobile accident based on the following:

On 31 December 1937 at approximately 2:00a.m., while investigating a call of a woman screaming for help, as she was having trouble with her drunken boyfriend.

Officer Barlow and his partner Officer James M. Leverton were handling the call when they were both struck by John E. Kelly, of the 3300 block of Hamilton Avenue (Kelly was the son of a retired Central District Officer) Officer Barlow was killed instantly, and Officer Leverton was seriously injured. This took place at the intersection of Belair Rd. and Pelham Ave. It would be eight blocks, to nearly one mile from the scene of the accident before Kelly would be stopped by another radio car operated by Patrolmen, John M. Dippel and John W. Campbell. Once stopped Kelley was arrested, and charged with Driving While Intoxicated, Driving Under the Influence, Hit and Run personal injury, Hit and Run Property Damage and numerous other vehicular, and Criminal Offenses.

Kelly would be held in city jail without bail from the time of his arrest until the 6th of January 1938, because Dr. F. L. C. Helm, “Acting Automobile Coroner”, declined to set bail after his arrest. It would be a week later before Kelly would receive a hearing via a Habeas Corpus Hearing when we would hear a defense attorney make a statement that lets us know today, things back then were just as bad and seemingly unjust as they are today, and that Defense Attorneys were 100% just as heartless. The Defense Attorneys of 1938/39 was just as much a disgrace with a lack of couth back then, as they are today… being represented at the time by an attorneys named John E. Magers and Bernard H. Herzfeld.

Attorney Magers said one of the most disgusting and disturbing things I may have ever heard come from the mouth of someone that is suposed to represent integrity and equality in our court system when he said, “If he were not a policeman involved in this case, the defendant would have been admitted to bail,” then he went on to say, “Defendants in cases more serious than this one have been released on bail.” SMH… I mean seriously, WHAT COULD BE MORE SERIOUS THAN "KILLING" A POLICE OFFICER, Taking the LIFE of someone that's sole job is to uphold PEACE, maintain ORDER & FAIRNESS in society. Don’t get me wrong, I know there are some serious crimes out there... Child Abuse, Kiddie Porn, Rape, Murder etc. But this Attorney John Magers, said it like the life of a Police Officer, the life of our Brother, the life of Officer Thomas J. Barlow was no big deal, like he was disposable, a police officer to a city, a husband to Mrs. Irene M. Barlow and Daddy to his four children, disposable to a drunk driver, to a defense attorney, and sadly to a court system, that would set bail on a man's freedom, that valued another man life at just $3000. And then that is just what Judge Robert F. Stanton did as he set Kelly’s Bail at $3000.00 – roughly $51,000.00 in today’s value. I’m not sure what crawled up Stanton’s court dress that day, he was normally a pretty good judge, and pro police, especially in cases where police were injured or killed, and in this case we have both. Yet he did what he did, and Kelly was bailed out by his wife, Mrs. Leopoldina “Leo” Kelly, who lived with her husband in the 3300 block of Hamilton Avenue.

On 10 Febuary 1938 Kelly would have his day in court, being convicted of manslaughter charges by Judge J. Abner Saylor in the criminal court in connection with our brother; Patrolman Thomas J. Barlow's death; Based on testimony of, the arresting officers, and a cab driver that saw the entire incident. The sentencing was suspended on the request of Kelly’s attorney. John E. Majors and Bernard Herzfeld. Pending a motion for a new trial. Once again I am sitting here shaking my head... did they have something on this Judge Stanton, I mean seriously what in the world was going on.

But this was not the end… while I couldn’t find anything else on this case, I did find the following: In a Sun Paper Article dated - 8 April 1939… it was about several suits involving vehicular manslaughter that had added up to more than $125,000.00 ( in today's money that would be $2,125,000.00 ) and one of those actions involved Mrs. Irene M. Barlow, the widowed mother of four who was at one time married to Patrolman Thomas J. Barlow. ( I copied just the part of the article that pertained to this story. ) "Mrs. Barlow seeks $50,000 ($850,000.00) - Mrs. Irene M. Barlow widow of patrolman Thomas J. Barlow, who was killed in a hit-and-run accident last December, filed an action in Superior Court seeking $50,000 from John E. Kelly who was serving one year in the House of Corrections for manslaughter, in connection with the death of Officer T. J. Barlow. The suit was entered jointly by Mrs. Barlow and her three juvenile children." (Apparently on of their children had reached the age of 18 - or we have a newspaper error) OK… so from this brief article we learn - John E. Kelly received a one year sentence in the House of corrections for killing a police officer, a manslaughter, taking the life of our brother Patrolman Thomas J Barlow. Not as much time as one should get for killing anyone, much less killing a police officer… but it's better than a suspended sentence. And while we don’t know if Mrs. Barlow and her three children won their civil suit, we can only hope they did, as $50,000.00 in 1939/1940 would be worth: $850,000.00 in today’s currency. would show Tommy Barlow's life was more important than taking away a year of Kelly's life.

Thomas J Barlow, was a member of the Baltimore Police Department since 1919. He was husband to Mrs. Irene M. Barlow and was the father of four children.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

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ROBERT JOHN BARLOW
54-W: 22
End of Watch: April 23, 1978
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1937 we lost our brother Police Officer Thomas J Barlow based on the following - On December 31, 1937 at approximately 2:17 a.m., Officer Barlow was struck and killed by an automobile at the intersection of Belair Road and Pelham Avenue. Officer Barlow was investigating a call for a “woman screaming in the street.” Officer Barlow was hurrying to the aid of a woman who was having trouble with her drunken boyfriend. One patrolman was killed instantly and another· injured early yesterday when they were struck by a hit-run driver on the Belair road at Pelham avenue. The officer who was killed was Thomas J. Barlow, a member of the Baltimore Police Department since 1919 and the father of four children. Patrolman James M. Leverton, his radio-car teammate. was injured. Almost a mile from the scene of the accident, the crew of another radio car arrested John E. Kelly, of the 3300 block Hamilton avenue, and placed four charges against him. Both officers were standing beside their machine when struck, after answering a complaint.

John E Kelly was found guilty of Manslaughter in the Fatal Accident that took the life of Officer Thomas J Barlow - John E. Kelly yesterday was found guilty of manslaughter by Judge J. Abner Sayler in the Criminal Court in connection with the death of Patrolman Thomas J. Barlow of the Northeastern district last December. Sentence was suspended on the request of Mr. Kelly's Attorneys. John E. Majors and Bernard Herzfeld. Pending a motion for a new trial. Kelly, son of a retired Central district policeman. Pleaded not guilty in the hit-run accident in which Barlow and Patrolman James Leverton. Crew of a Northeastern district radio car were struck while standing by their parked machine at Belair road and Pelham Avenue. Killed Almost Instantly I Barlow, who lived at Rossville was Killed almost instantly. Leverton suffered an injured hip cuts and bruises Testimony adduced by William H. Maynard Deputy State's Attorney, and Charles H. Knapp Jr. Assistant State's Attorney was that Kelly's machine hit the policemen and went on eight blocks before Kelly was apprehended.

Chased By Other Officers 

Kelly's car was halted according to the testimony by Patrolman John M Dipple, and John W. Campbell of the Northeastern District, who had witnessed the accident and chased the machine. Kelly said he did not know of the accident until hailed by police. Francis Einwick of 3300 Block Cliftmount Avenue a taxicab driver testified that he had parked his machine near the scene of the accident: that he saw Kelly drive at approximately fifty five miles per hour toward the police officer, He said he called to the Officer to, “watch out!” just before the were hit. Kelly lives in the 3300 Block Hamilton Avenue

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WILLIAM C BAUMER
18-E: 15
End of Watch: January 25, 1967
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 25 January 1967 we lost our brother Police Officer William J. Baumer to a heart attack on the job during a struggle based on the following:

Officer Baumer suffered a fatal heart attack Early 25 January 1967, as he attempted to arrest a 21 year-old man after a disturbance at a sandwich shop at the comer of Orleans street and Patterson Park avenue, while struggling with a suspect that he was arresting he felt pain in his chest and collapsed.

It happened during the struggle when Patrolman Baumer was taking the young man to a police call box about a block and a half away, the suspect broke free after a brief struggle, as Officer Baumer started to give chase when he collapsed and crumpled to the sidewalk.

He was dead on arrival at Church Home and Hospital. An Autopsy showed that a heart attack was the cause of death. It was ruled that the struggle was not responsible for the attack.

Patrolman William Baumer, was 49 years of age at the time of his Death - A requiem mass was offered for William J. Baumer, at 9A.M. Saturday at Sacred Heart. Catholic Church, 600 South Conkling street.

A veteran of twenty years on the force, he was born and raised in East Baltimore, and graduated from Patterson Park High "School Army Service In Europe” Patrolman Baumer joined the Baltimore Police Department in 1947 after service in that Army tour which included duty in Europe during World War II

Baumer's survivors include two sisters: Mrs. Margaret Punte and Miss Barbara Baumer, and two brothers John Baumer and Germanus Baumer, Jr., all of Baltimore

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

While struggling with an arrested suspect for a disturbance in a sandwich shop at Orleans Street and Patterson Park Avenue, Officer Baumer died of a heart attack. Officer Baumer was able to take the suspect to the nearest callbox where he collapsed and the suspect broke free.


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JOHN B BEALEFELD
29-E: 15
End of Watch: September 10, 1945
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1945, we lost our brother Police Officer John B. Bealefeld. On August 30, 1945 Officer Bealefeld was sent to investigate a family disturbance in the 1500 Blk. Boyle St. Upon arrival he met up with two brothers, Thomas and Joseph Geisler, these brothers were not exactly what one would call, model citizens; in fact from the street these two could be heard inside their 1526 Boyle St home swearing, yelling and fighting at all hours. Because of their language and actions, they were menacing to the neighborhood; frightening those that lived, or passed by. Neither would listen to Officer Bealefeld’s orders to quiet down, and act civil. We have all heard their senseless argument, “No one is coming into my house and telling me how to act, what to say, or how loud I can say it!” So Bealefild did what many of us have done, and or would have done, “I can’t tell you how to act in your house, fine; you’re under arrest, I will take you to my house, (the stationhouse) and while there, I will give you a free lesson in how to act, what to say, and how loud you can say it!” Bealefeld was a big man... he informed them of their arrest, and lead the way out of their house where he would have begin to escort them down to the callbox, to call for a wagon. As the three exited the building into the night, neither brother was handcuffed, and neither brother wanted to go to jail... Joseph in particular, so first chance he got, he balled up his fist and struck Officer Bealefeld in the back of the head with everything he had. At this point something else we have all experienced in Baltimore came into play that night. Those beautiful marble steps; those marble steps that when wet are as slippery as ice. Considering his size, the weather, and an unexpected attack, he did what any of us would have and fell several steps to the ground below. As he fell he twisted, and turned with a force so strong the femur in his leg broke into two, and while suffering pain from a broken leg, and a blow to the back of his head he still managed to have the presence of mind to reach out and grab Josepha Geisler as he attempted to run passed. Now with a broken leg, busted head and a POS in his hand, he began to call out for help. Other officers were arriving on scene almost as he was falling from the porch and took control of Joseph Geisler. Joseph and Thomas Geisler were both taken to Southern District for processing, Officer Bealefeld was taken to South Baltimore General Hospital where he would stay for several days before passing away on September 10th due to an embolism resulting from the fracture in his femur. Joseph Geisler was charged with his murder.

Officer Bealefeld was married to Lillian Bealefeld they had no children – He gave 16 years and 6 months service to the Baltimore Police Department. As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten. His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Police Department. RIP Officer John B. Bealefeld


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WILLIAM A BELL
41-E: 14
End of Watch: January 2, 1932
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 2 Jan 1932 we lost our brother Officer William A. Bell - Officer Bell was shot and killed instantly on 2 January, 1932, while trying to arrest a burglary suspect, Willie Wright, in a 3rd floor apartment at 1709 Madison Avenue. The suspect was wanted for a series of burglaries in the Northwestern District. He was apprehended in Washington, D.C. on January 4, 1932. Officer Bell was 52 years old and unmarried. Officer Bell joined the department on October 1, 1908. We lost our brother Officer William A. Bell to gunfire based on the following –

On 2 January, 1932, while attempting to arrest burglary suspect, Walter Wright, on a series of burglaries warrants in the Northwestern District; and while in a 3rd floor apartment located at 1709 Madison Avenue. The suspect opened fire on Officer Bell hitting him two times in the upper body, killing him instantly. The suspect jumped over Officer Bell’s lifeless body as he made his escape down a back set of stairs. When Officer Bell’s partner, Officer William Sempeck came in, he was slowed as he briefly stopped his pursuit to capture Suspect Walter Wright as he stopped momentarily to help Officer Bell to the ground, and render first aide, it was only after he realized the fate of his friend that he continued on in his chase for Walter Wright. Due to unfamiliar area, steep, long winding stairwell, Officer Sempeck would lose his suspect that night; he was quoted as saying, “He must’ve leaped down them, he got away so fast!” Wright would be arrested 2 days on 4 January 1932 while in Washington D.C.

The following are from two newspaper articles dated, 3 Jan 1932 and, 26 Jan 1932. They wrote a little differently back then; so some words were changed to represent a more modern way of expressing events.

BLACK MALE HOLDS UP SUSPECT KILLED PATROLMAN - 3 January 1932

Black Male Holds Up Suspect Kills Patrolman, William A Bell - 52

The Death in an Apartment House - Assailant Jumps Over Body, and Flees

Wilbur Wright, Accused by Police, is Sought Throughout The City

Patrolman William a Bell, 52 was shot and instantly killed shortly before 9 o’clock last night (2 January 1932) by a Black male believed by the police to a been Wilbert Wright. - William Bell and Patrolman William Sempeck were about to make the arrest in the third floor apartment at 1709 Madison Avenue.

The Black male jumped over the body of Policeman Bell as Patrolman Sempeck chased him down three flights of narrow, winding stairs. He escaped before his pursuer had a chance to fire a single shot.

WRIGHT IS HOLD UP SUSPECT

Wright, a suspect in a series of holdups and robberies in the northern section of the city, is said to have killed Bell as the patrolman was standing guard at one of the doors to the apartment in which detectives asserted they had learned the suspect (Wright) was visiting.

Patrolman Sempeck had gone to a door about 20 feet from the stair landing in the hall and Bell had stationed himself at a door to the apartment near the stairway. Sempeck said he entered the apartment, and as he was walking through a dark room heard a shot.

SAW VICTIM FALLING

He said he then ran to the living room in the apartment, and saw Officer Bell falling to the floor in the doorway. A Black Male was leaping over Officer Bell’s body, while two black females, and a man stood huddled in a corner.

“I tried to catch Bell as he was falling.” Sempeck said, “Then I laid him on the floor and started after Wright who was already running down the rear stairs. He must’ve leaped down them, he got away so fast.”

POLICE DRAGNET SPREAD

In a few minutes a score of policeman from the Northwest District Station and a detailed Detective from Headquarters had reached the scene. Every police station in the city was notified of the killing and a police dragnet was spread in an effort to capture the killer. Police headquarters in Washington and other nearby cities also were told of the shooting and asked to watch for the fleeing suspect. Policeman looked for the fugitive at railway stations and area wharfs.

Charles D Gaither, Police Commissioner, announced that he personally would give a $250 reward for information leading to the arrest of the killer.

OCCUPANTS ARREST

The three occupants of the apartment at which the shooting occurred were arrested and held as states witnesses they were Dorothy Paulson, 29, who lived in the building, Andrew Walker, 29, who also lived in the building, and Katherine Dobson, 23 from the 1500 block of McCulloch Street.

Detectives found two guns – a .45 caliber automatic with a .45 caliber Army Revolver – both were in a white paper bag within the apartment. The residents of the neighborhood described Wright as a, “Bad man” and said he usually carries two pistols.

HELD WARRANT FOR ARREST

The police said they had been holding numerous wants for Wright’s arrest during the last few months. And that patrolman Bell had learned from an informant that Wright could be found in the Madison Avenue apartment house. The policeman had a warrant last night for Wright’s arrest in connection with a burglary in the 300 block of E. 25th St.

Wright has served five years in the penitentiary. He was arrested for the first time September 27, 1918, for the theft of a bicycle and was paroled of by Judge John J Dobler. In April 1919, he was sentenced to six months in the house of corrections for purse snatching.

SENTENCED TO PEN

He was sentenced to the pen in 1923 on charges of burglary, larceny and carrying concealed weapons. He received five years on each count, to be served at concurrently.

He appears in police records under various aliases – Walter Brian, James Wheatley, PD right and William Taylor.

The shooting attracted hundreds of persons, and the police were originally hampered in their investigation by the milling crowd.

BLACK MALE DESCRIBED

Wright, a light-skinned Black Male, is about 5’5” tall and weighs about 135 pounds. Patrolman Sempeck said the Black Male who fled the shooting was wearing light trousers, but had no coat or hat, when he fled.

Norbert Norris, 26, a taxicab driver living in the 2200 block of E. Fayette St., said he picked up a Black Male who answered Wrights description at McCulloch and Mosher streets about 15 minutes after the shooting this black male, however was wearing a hat and coat Norris said he took him to Madison and Bond Streets.

GAITHER OFFERS REWARD

In announcing the reward for Wright’s capture, Commissioner Gaither said, “It is a case of another policeman shot down in the performance of his duty, and just goes to show the Baltimore police are ready to make the supreme sacrifice at any time.” Gaither went on to say, “This man (Officer Bell) was one of the Boy Scouts”

Patrolman Bell recently had been assigned to day shift, but last night was on a special detail because a large number of robberies, and holdups on the northern end of the city in the last few months.

APPOINTED IN 1908

Patrolman Bell was appointed to the police force on October 1, 1908. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Emma Bell, and his sister, Mrs. Jeanette McGeoch. All lived at 2949 Clifton Ave.

Patrolman Bell is also survived by two daughters, and a son. They are Mrs. Ruth King, of New York, Mrs. Naomi Bell and Edward Bell of this city

FIVE POLICEMAN KILLED BY BLACK MALES SINCE 1926

Five Northwestern district policemen have been fatally shot by black males since the summer of 1962.

Patrolman Webster E Schuman and Thomas Dillon, clerk at the station house, were fatally injured by a crazed black male at Lafayette and Argyle Avenues, on June 28, 1926 seven other persons were injured at that time.

PATROLMAN KILLED

on August 5, 1927 patrolman William F Doehler was shot and killed by David Berry, a black male, as the officer, with the suspect in custody, waited for the patrol wagon at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Biddle Street. The suspect in that case never was caught.

Patrolman John P Burns was shot over the heart by Willie Smith, a black male, on January 26, 1931, as patrolman Burns, accompanied by another officer, attempted to arrest the black male in the house in the 500 block of St. Mary Street. Patrolman Burns died the following day. The suspect in that case was riddled with bullets as he fled the scene.

HONORED POSTHUMOUSLY

Last week Mrs. Margaret Burns was the recipient of the honor award intended for her husband. Gov. Ritchie made the presentation

The following is the 2nd article

BLACK MALE CONVICTED OF KILLING OFFICER

Wright found guilty of First-Degree of Murder of Patrolman Bell

Sentence due soon

Death Penalty or Life Term Mandatory – Prisoner Visibly Affected by Verdict

Walter F Wright a Black Male who shot and killed patrolman William a Bell, of the Northwestern District, was found guilty of murder in the first degree late yesterday by Chief Judge Samuel K Dennis and Judge Duke bond. The verdict was announced following the trial of Wright in criminal court.

Sentence was suspended to enable Wright to confer with his court-appointed counsel, Welford F Coyle Jr. Under Maryland law, the verdict makes either the Death Penalty or Life imprisonment mandatory.

SENTENCE TO BE IMPOSED

Unless a motion for a new trial is requested, sentence will be imposed before the end of the week.

The verdict was announced after the judges had conferred for a few minutes in chambers. Wright, who had listened intently to the witnesses and the attorneys during the closing arguments, but without displaying any emotions, was affected visibly by the verdict.

KILLED A JANUARY 2

Patrolman Bell was killed January 2, when accompanied by Patrolman William Sempeck, he went to the third floor the house at 1704 Madison Avenue to arrest Wright, wanted on a warrant charging burglary, Wright fired while escaping and was caught the following day in Washington DC.

Wright did not testify, but in a confession read into the record by the state, he said, Patrolman Bell fired first, apparently, however, without intending to hit anyone that he (Wright) then fired over his (Patrolman Bell’s) head, that patrolman Bell fired a shot at him, and that he then fired two more shots in the direction of the patrolman.

ENTRY HELD ILLEGAL

The defense contended that the facts as presented by the state failed to show premeditation, and that the patrolman illegally entered the Madison Street home and did not actually have the warrant for Wrights arrest in their possession.

Charles C. G. Evans and William Carswell Baxter, assistant state’s attorneys, the prosecution argued that Wright, who lives in Washington, knew he was wanted by the police here and that he came to Baltimore armed with an automatic pistol and two revolvers.

FIRST-DEGREE VERDICT ASKED

The shooting was done by Wright in an attempt to escape justice, the prosecution held, and ask for verdict of first degree murder.

Patrolman Bell was shot twice. The weapon used by right had been stolen from the home of a Washington patrolman.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

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NELSON F BELL JR
17-W: 16
End of Watch: October 27, 1978
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On October 22, 1978, shortly after 8:00 p.m. a security guard approached two Central District officers He stated that an armed man was menacing citizens at the rear of the downtown Trailways Bus Terminal. The officers quickly passed through the crowded terminal and exited to the bus loading area where they confronted the suspect, who was armed with a rifle. As the suspect raised the weapon to a firing position, the Central Officers sought cover behind a parked bus. They then ordered the suspect to drop his weapon. He refused and continued to aim at one of the officers. At this point the officers fired as the suspected retreated into a dark shadow. The officers notified the dispatcher of the situation at hand. Other units immediately began responding, including K-9 Officer Nelson F. Bell. Officers who began arriving at the scene heard several shots and fellow officers pleading with the suspect to drop his weapon. As they inched their way through three narrow alleyways, which accessed the bus loading area, they observed the officers seeking cover as the suspect threatened them with various weapons. The events were moving quickly, the suspect was not responding to the efforts of the officers who were trying to calm the situation. Two officers began climbing the nearby rooftop in an effort to obtain an advantageous position should additional application of deadly force become necessary. Before they could get to their destination, the suspect, armed with a bow and arrow, lunged at the officers. There was a volley of shots, involving several of the many officers who had responded. The suspect went down. Officers went to the suspect’s side in order to provide first aid. The suspect was dead. At this time, an officer noticed that Officer Bell had been shot. He sustained a massive head wound and lay bleeding thirty feet from the suspect. He was transported to University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Unit where teams of medical specialists worked to save his life. The injuries were too massive and he died on 27 Oct 1978 after five days of treatment. The question of where the fatal shot came from may never be answered. Officer Bell’s position was such that he was not in direct line of fire from any of those Officers who were involved in trying to ricocheting from the tall brick walls, which surrounded the bus loading area, may have found Officer Bell.
On this day in Baltimore Police History we lost our Brother K9 Officer Nelson F. Bell to gunfire based on the following; On October 22, 1978, shortly after 8:00 p.m. a security guard approached two Central District officers He stated that an armed man was menacing citizens at the rear of the downtown Trailways Bus Terminal. The officers quickly passed through the crowded terminal and exited to the bus loading area where they confronted the suspect, who was armed with a rifle. As the suspect raised the weapon to a firing position, the Central Officers sought cover behind a parked bus. They then ordered the suspect to drop his weapon. He refused and continued to aim at one of the officers. At this point the officers fired as the suspected retreated into a dark shadow. The officers notified the dispatcher of the situation at hand. Other units immediately began responding, including K-9 Officer Nelson F. Bell. Officers who began arriving at the scene heard several shots and fellow officers pleading with the suspect to drop his weapon. As they inched their way through three narrow alleyways, which accessed the bus loading area, they observed the officers seeking cover as the suspect threatened them with various weapons. The events were moving quickly, the suspect was not responding to the efforts of the officers who were trying to calm the situation. Two officers began climbing the nearby rooftop in an effort to obtain an advantageous position should additional application of deadly force become necessary. Before they could get to their destination, the suspect, armed with a bow and arrow, lunged at the officers. There was a volley of shots, involving several of the many officers who had responded. The suspect went down. Officers went to the suspect’s side in order to provide first aid. The suspect was dead. At this time, an officer noticed that Officer Bell had been shot. He sustained a massive head wound and lay bleeding thirty feet from the suspect. He was transported to University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Unit where teams of medical specialists worked to save his life. The injuries were too massive and he died on 27 Oct 1978 after five days of treatment. The question of where the fatal shot came from may never be answered. Officer Bell’s position was such that he was not in direct line of fire from any of those Officers who were involved in trying to ricocheting from the tall brick walls, which surrounded the bus loading area, may have found Officer Bell.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

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JOSEPH DANIEL BENEDICT
11-W: 11
End of Watch: February 13, 1948
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 13 Feb 1948 we lost our brother Patrolman Joseph D. Benedict to gun fire based on the following.
After a series of cab hold ups, Sgt. Mann of the Northern District was making a routine cab check, pulling alongside a cab he called out to a cabbie to see if everything was alright. It just so happened that cabbie Michael J Kozak had in his car as a passenger the suspect police were looking for; 24-year-old Roy Arnold Wood was sitting alongside Kozak with a gun to his ribs, he ordered Kozak to refuse cooperation with the Police Sergeant, and to “KEEP GOING… KEEP GOING” The cabbie bravely double clutched causing his cab to stall, Officer Benedict quickly exited his car and approached the cab on the side away from the driver, the suspect threw open the door and fired one shot which struck the policeman just below his badge. The gunman then jumped out of the cab and fled as Sgt. Fred Mann the Patrolman’s companion, fired three shots. Police believe that the gunman was the same man who had robbed Howard Profft, a cab driver, of the 1500 block of E. Baltimore St. of his cab and $16 at about 3:30 o’clock that same morning. He had freedom for a few days, but as you will read in the following sun paper articles, he was eventually captured.

First and article that says it all for all of of our fallen brothers and sisters:
A COMMUNITY TRAGEDY

A Community Tragedy - Feb 14, 1948  - The murder of Patrolman Joseph D Benedict is something far more than the personal tragedy of his bereaved family and his intimate friends. It is a tragedy in which the entire community shares. That is because Patrolman Benedict, as he performed his fatal duty in the early morning of Friday 13 Feb 1948), embodied the law. And the law is the set of rules by which a civilized community lives-without which, by definition; it cannot deserve the description "civilized." The murder of Patrolman Benedict was a direct attack on the embodiment of the law. Such an attack cannot go unpunished, because it is a direct challenge to society. The police, we may be sure, will do their utmost to capture the murderer(s). They have a right to expect aid from any member of the community who is in a position to give it. It is to encourage such aid by the community at large that the Sun paper has offered a reward of $1,000 for the person or persons who may be responsible for the apprehension of the murderer(s).

After this the following events took place, from the Baltimore Sun

MAN QUIZZED IN KILLING OF POLICEMAN

16 February 1948

Caught in elaborate police trap as girl gives tip; found armed

Police last night overpower and arrest a 24-year-old armed man in connection with the slaying of patrolman Joseph D Benedict. The man was taken in the custody at Broadway and Pratt Street at 8:30 PM to head out on a date with his girlfriend. Although he had not been entered on the police docket early this morning, he was being questioned at the detective Bureau where he was taken immediately after his arrest.

PREARRANGED SIGNAL

Leading the squad of 30 men which participated in the capture were Hamilton R Atkinson police Commissioner; chief inspector M Joseph Wallace; Capt. Henry J Chris, commander of detectives and Capt. Julie and I Forrest, commander of the northern district.

THE ENTIRE DETAIL WAS DRESSED IN PLAINCLOTHES

Key figure in elaborately arranged trap, however, was the girlfriend, who gave a prearranged signal when the man approached and spoke to her.

CROWD GATHERS

Immediately the police converged and grappled with the struggling man. A crowd of several hundred gathered almost immediately to watch as the police disarmed the man and rusting away in a private automobile. Plans for the arrest began to unfold at 6 PM when the police detectives assembled and Capt. Chris’s office for instructions. Participating for the entire homicide squad, led by Lieut. George Brian, approximate 20 detectives and several plainclothes in the northern district.

WAITED IN DOORWAYS

After being briefed, they took their post shortly after 6 o’clock. 12 automobiles were stationed strategically around the intersection, eight of them being placed at and near the corners and the others at the far end of the block. In order to be inconspicuous, the automobiles were all privately owned by individual policeman, and each was occupied by two men. Other men in the detail waited inside doorways or paced up and down the street.

SHE WAITED ON THE CORNER

The man the police had been told was to meet the girl at 830 o’clock. At 815 the girl, whose identity police declined to reveal appeared at the corner. She took up the vigil with Her back to the Goodwill industries. Capt. Chris stood waiting in the doorway, three other detectives the ordering on each of the other corners. At precisely 8:30 a young man appeared, walking south on Broadway. He was dressed in a tan garbage in topcoat, dark felt that, Brown shoes, brown pants and Red Sox.

CAPT. CHRIS DIVED

He crossed and Pratt Street to the Southeast corner there he stopped in front of the young girl. They spoke a few words. The girl then gave the prearranged signal. Capt. Chris dived from the doorway while other police rushed from their positions of concealment and from the opposite corners.

POLICE ON TOP OF HIM

In a moment they were grappling and then the man was on the sidewalk with at least a police pilot on top of him. The girl fell to the sidewalk. A woman pedestrian on the other side of the street screamed. Commissioner Atkinson and himself rushed up to help collar the man and disarmed him of a 38 caliber pistol. The captive was rushed to the nearest sedan, pushed into the back seat with Capt. Chris and Commissioner Atkinson and driven away.

SUITCASE AT STATION

At police headquarters he was searched and police took from his pockets a number of 38 caliber cartridges and a baggage check from the Mt. Royal station. Detectives took the check to the station where they recovered a cheap cardboard suitcase which contained a number of freshly laundered shirts, and unprecedented. Six dice, a blank notebook a slip of paper, bearing three telephone numbers. Capt. Chris and inspector Wallace was still questioning the man in Capt. Chris’s office and an early hour this morning. Meanwhile, police revealed that they had been covering a house on 33rd St. since Saturday morning. The man taken in the custody was said to have occupied a room there. Commissioner Atkinson and said that a discharged 38 caliber shell was found in the room which had been occupied by the tenant. Northern district police early this morning were still holding a 25-year-old man who had been arrested Saturday morning at his Mosher Street address. His 17-year-old wife, arrested at the same time, had been released a few hours after the arrest.

THREW OPEN DOOR

Patrolman Benedict was shot about 4:30 AM Friday on 33rd St. near the Alameda by a passenger in a taxicab which was approaching to investigate, a short time after another cab had been held up in the same general vicinity. As the patrolman approach to the cab on the side away from the driver, the passenger – who was sitting in the front seat – threw open the door and fired one shot which struck the policeman just below his badge. The gunman jumped out of the cab and fled as Sgt. Fred man the patrolman’s companion, fired three shots. Police believe that the gunman was the same man who had robbed Howard proof, a cab driver, of the 1500 block of E. Baltimore St. of his cab and $16 at about 330 o’clock that same morning.

FORCED FROM CAB

Proved picked the bandit up at St. Paul and center streets and at St. Paul and Mt. Royal Avenue felt the gun pressed into the back of his neck. After driving the bandit around for some time in the Guilford area the cab driver was forced from the cab at Calvert and 13 streets. The abandoned  cab with recovered at Guilford avenue and 20th St.

“KEEP GOING, KEEP GOING”

At about 4 o’clock that same morning, a man hailed a cab driven by Michael Kozak at North and Guilford avenues, and asked to be driven to loch Raven Boulevard and 33rd St. As the cab reached 33rd and the Alameda the police car drew alongside it and the Sgt. Mann called: “is everything all right cavity?” At that point Kozak said the passenger forced a hard object in his ribs and told him to “keep going keep going” But all turned ugly engaging and disengaging the clutch, Kozak was able to stall his cab and Patrolman Benedict got out of the police car and approached the cab.  As he approached the door the gunman removed his pistol from the cab his ribs and threw open the door and fired three shots at the Patrolman.

WIFE AND THREE CHILDREN

Patrolman Benedict was appointed to the Police Department in 1941 and has received four commendations from the Meritorious Service Board. In addition to his wife, he is survived by three children, Donald 14, Thomas 11 and Robert three his wife is expecting another child. Funeral services will be held at 8:15 AM tomorrow and a funeral home in a 900 block of N. Chester St. and the burial will be in holy Redeemer Cemetery, a requiem mass will be offered at 9 AM at St. Wenceslaus’s Catholic Church. Patrolman of the Northern district, to which Benedict was assigned, was service pallbearers.

As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless you and Rest in Peace Officer Joseph Daniel Benedict.


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BENJAMIN BENTON
35-E: 21
End of Watch: September 22, 1858
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. ROBERT M RIGDON
24-E: 21
End of Watch: November 8, 1858
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 22 Sept 1858 we lost our brother Police Officer Benjamin Benton to gunfire based on the following:
News reports would write - A Police Officer is Shot Dead - The Western Quarter of the city on Wednesday night was the scene of an affray, (a scuffle) the result of which was the instant killing of police officer Benjamin Benton, of the western district, by a single shot from a pistol in the hands of a man named Henry Gambrill, (Henry Gambrill was the keeper of a public house on Franklin street, near Howard street.) It appears that a dance or some other kind of amusement was going on in the house on Biddle street, near Pennsylvania avenue. A number of disorderly characters were among those present, and about 11:30PM officer Burke, of that beat, apprehending a disturbance, gave the usual “Double Rap” for assistance, (Note; the “double rap” refers to striking an officers baton (Espantoon) against any solid building, downspout or cobblestone street to summons other officers in the area to come help him – (Basically the “Double Rap” was 1858’s version of a 10-16 just a step above a sig 13) Burk was joined by his brother “Officers Benton”, (the deceased) Rigdon, and Brown, who seized two of the party – “David Houck and John Isenhart” – at the request of the proprietor of the house, and attempted to take them to the station-house. Benton and Rigdon had hold of Houck, and while struggling with him, Gambrill interfered, and after threatening to knock Benton down, stepped back several paces, leveling a revolver within three feet of Benton’s head, fired. The ball entered immediately back of the left ear, and passing entirely through the neck, came out at the right ear, almost in line with its entrance. Benton released hold on Houck, and fell dead, the ball having severed the spinal cord and cut the base of the brain away. - Gambrill escaped, but was afterwards arrested by Captain Linaweaver, and locked up with Houck and Isenhart at the western on Pine Street station…

The investigation was concluded at about three o’clock yesterday morning, when the jury rendered the verdict that the deceased, Benjamin Benton, came to his death from a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Henry Gambrill, who was immediately committed to jail by Justice Logan for the action of the grand jury…

Mr. Benton was connected with the police department for eight years past and was retained through several administrations, which intervened on the account of his excellent qualities as an officer. He was about 45 years of age, and leaves a wife and five children.

The Widow of Officer Benton. - The first branch of the council last evening adopted a resolution to pay the widow of police officer Benjamin Benton, killed on Wednesday night in the discharge of his duty, $520, or one year’s salary.

Note; Mr. Gambrill was sentenced “to be hanged by the neck until he be dead.”

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten. His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Police Department. RIP Officer Benjamin Benton


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ALONZO B BISHOP
32-E: 15
End of Watch: August 29, 1899
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 29 August 1899 we lost our brother Police Officer Alonzo B. Bishop to the departments first ever traffic related death.

At the time Baltimore was a booming port city and accidents were a natural part of the busy streets of Baltimore. Western District’s Officer Alonzo B. Bishop and Wagon Driver William Smeak were patrolling the Western, a district of heavy footed drivers and rumbling street cars. The two were headed to answer a wagon call to call box #23 (Poppleton & Pratt) where they were to pick up a prisoner from an officer that had just made an arrest. As they began crossing Freemount Ave. they were struck by street car number #556 of the Freemount Ave. line. Those that witnessed the collision said it hit with such force that it lifted and threw the wagon across the street and into a telephone pole. Officer John Delaney was nearby and witnessed the accident, he quickly gained control of the wagon, and horses (In 1899 a wagon man operated horse drawn wagons) P/O Delaney righted the wagon, and with assistance from the public loaded both men into the wagon; he then drove them to University of Maryland Hospital (some things never change). Wagon man Smeak, was treated for non-life threatening injuries. Officer Bishop however was in agony, as he lay there in the hospital ER. Doctors at the time felt if they could operate they might be able to save his life, but he developed a Peritonitis, which is an inflammation of the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. Since Officer Bishop’s injuries were mostly abdominal surgery was impossible. He was in an unbearable pain as he lay there knowing there was nothing that could be done, and that he was waiting to die. His family by his side, he said his goodbyes, and died on this day 29 August 1899.

At the time of his death Officer Bishop was 42 years old, he was married, and had two grown sons Alonzo and John, and a grown daughter Bessie, all married.

 POLICEMEN HURT

The Sun (1837-1987); Aug 25, 1899;

pg. 7       

POLICEMEN HURT

Western District Patrol Wagon

Crew Badly Injured

Patrol Wagon Driver William Smeak and Reserve Officer Alonzo Bishop, of the Western police district, were thrown from the patrol wagon early this morning at Lexington and Fremont streets. Officer Bishop sustained n fractured skull and was otherwise Injured. Driver Smeak was injured internally. Both were taken to the Maryland University Hospital. Officer Bishop is not expected to live. The patrol wagon was crossing Fremont Street at Lexington when it was struck by car 536 of the McMechen street division of the United Railways and Electric Company.

The force of the car knocked the wagon into a telegraph post on the Southwest corner. The wagon was badly broken. The wagon was responding to a call from box 25, at Poppleton and Pratt streets. In going to this box it is customary to drive west on Lexington street and thence south on Poppleton street on account of the asphalt pavement. Before reaching cross streets the bell of the patrol wagon Is rung to notify wagons and cars of Its coming. The wagon passed over the east tracks on Fremont street and was half way across the west tracks, when it was struck by the car, which was bound south. Officer Bishop was thrown out first, as the car struck the rear wheel immediately behind where he was sitting. He fell on his head and was rendered unconscious. The force of the car raised the back of the wagon from the street, hurling it against the telegraph post. Drlver Smeak was thrown into the middle of the street. Patrolman John R. Delaney, who was on duty near the corner, went to the assistance of the injured men. He notified Lieutenant Kalbfielsch and then put the men in the wagon to take them to the hospital. Driver Smeak was conscious. He was unable to tell how the wagon was struck. Deputy Marshal Farnan and Captain Cadwallader were notified and both went to the hospital. Conductor Egbert P. Maynard and Motorman Robert S. Berry had charge of the car. Neither would make a statement. The dashboard of the car was demolished. After taking the men to the hospital Patrolman Delancy answered the call at box 25, which was for a colored man charged with being drunk and disorderly. Driver Smeak is considered one of the best hostlers in the employ of the Police Department. He is unmarried and lives at 706 West Lexington Street. He was appointed a patrolman April 2, 1887, and has been In charge of the wagon at the Western Station since the patrol system was put into use, about nine years ago. He is careful and attentive to his work. He Is 43 years old. Officer Bishop was born in Baltimore in 1830. He was appointed a patrolman on August 19, 1886, and since his connection with the department figured in a number of important arrests. Of late years he has been reserve officer at the Western Station at night, and went with the wagon on all calls. He is married and lives at 1307 North Gilmore street.

OFFICER BISHOP DEAD

The Sun (1837-1987); Aug 30, 1899;

pg. 7

OFFICER BISHOP DEAD

Injuries He Received In A Collision. Prove Fatal Reserve Officer Alonzo Bishop, of the Western Police District, who was injured last Thursday night in a collusion between the patrol wagon and a car of the Fremont avenue line, died early yesterday morning at the Maryland University Hospital. His wife and son were with him at the time of his death. Previous to Monday some slight hopes of his recovery were entertained, but peritonitis set in during that day, and the fatal result was afterward expected. It was found that he would be unable to stand an operation for peritonitis, and none was made. An inquest will be held Sunday at l P.M. at the Western Police Station. Mr. Bishop was born in Baltimore in 1837. He was reared and educated here, and went on the police force in 1886. His work as patrolman was very successful, and he was liked by all those associated with him. His widow, two sons John W. and Alonzo, both married and a married daughter, Mrs. Bessie Haugh, survive him. Mr. Bishop's home was at 1307 North Gilmor Street.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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JOHN BLANK
11-W: 16
End of Watch: February 12, 1934
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 12 Feb 1934 we lost our brother Police Officer John Blank - Officer Blank had less than five minutes to end his shift in the Northeastern district, when he was shot and killed by three safe crackers making their escape from H. L. Carpel, Inc., a mayonnaise manufacturer in the 1400 block of North Central... It all began when an officer noticed something going on in the factory and called for backup units Officer Blank responded and secured the rear of the establishment. As other officers went into the building through the front entrance, three men ran out of the back. On their way out they began firing their weapons, in Officer Blank's direction. One of their shots found its way to Officer Blank, striking him in his temple, killing him.

 As we take this time to remember Officer John Blank, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department want him to know will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.


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JOHN R J BLOCK
28-E: 13
End of Watch: April 21, 1933
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 21 April 1933 we lost our brother, Police Officer John R. J. Block to gunfire based on the following;

In the early hours of April 21, 1933, three young men robbed several United Bus drivers. According to reports, the buses were held up at their northern terminal, Charles and Thirty-ninth Streets, by two men who had boarded a bus driven by William Hoffmaster, 2600 block Hampden Ave, at Charles and Franklin streets and had ridden to the end of the line. There, as they left the bus, they held up Hoffmaster and later forced Lawrence Muster, 3400 Keswick road, who was at the wheel of a waiting bus, into the Hoffmaster bus and took all the money both of them had, $63.00. A lookout for the possible get-away car was broadcast and Officer Block stopped it.

As Officer Block approached the car, he was shot and killed. The three suspect escaped and began a two state manhunt including the District of Columbia. Law enforcement agencies from surrounding counties, the city, and the FBI joined efforts to locate the assailants.

The entire Story can be read hear the way it was in April of 1933

Found wounded beside his police car a few moments after he had halted an automobile suspected of figuring in the hold-up of two Charles street busses earlier in the night, Patrolman, John Block, Southern district, died at 1.34 A. M. 21 April 1933 at the South Baltimore General Hospital.

The machine, bearing Florida licenses No. 115345, was reported to be headed for Annapolis, and 'Baltimore police were put on guard at all points where the car might leave the city while State police were guarding all highways. They hoped to capture the automobile before daylight.

Three men being sought in the case are believed to have registered at an apartment house in the 600 block North Charles Street Monday noon as Buck Slade, Bill Drake and Joe Green, of St. Augustine, Florida. According to their landlady, Mrs. Howard R. Yourtee, they paid a week's rent in advance, were especially well dressed and rather quiet, but "had a serious look for such young men."

The police all-round for the Florida car was given out at the roll call going on in all districts of the city at the time of the Charles street bus hold-up.

Speeding Car Is Seen

Shortly after the bus drivers, Lawrence Huster, 3400 block Keswick road, and William Hoffmaster, 2600 block Hampden avenue, had been forced at pistol point to hand over their day's receipts, the machine shot past them at a high rate of speed, with its headlights doused.

Patrolman Robert L. Campbell, Northern district, who had arrived, on the scene and was listening to the bus drivers' troubles, jotted down the license number, but at the time didn't connect it with the hold-up.

Hold-Up, Shooting Linked

It was only afterward, when a fuller account of the hold-up men's actions and the news of the policeman's shooting had been pieced together, that the incident took on significance.

Hoffmaster told the police that the two men boarded his bus shortly before midnight at Charles and Franklin streets and rode to the end of the line, Charles and Thirty-ninth streets. There they deposited their fares in his coin box-one of them putting in a dime and the other eleven cents.

Then they produced their pistols.

Money Demanded

"Let's have the change rack-and whatever bills you've got,"they ordered. 

As Hoffmaster handed over the money the shorter of the two men said to his partner: "You get the other man. I can take care of this fellow!"

The taller man returned to the bus in a moment with Huster and forced him into Hoffrnaster's bus. After stripping them of their money-they took $34 from Huster and $29 from Hoffmaster.  The pair stepped to the pavement and, turning to the frightened drives, they said,

"You stay right there. We're coming; back in five minutes - if either of you has moved, we'll kill you deader than hell!".

Bandits Flee

They then fled down Thirty-ninth Street. It was but a few minutes later that Patrolman Campbell jotted down the number of the speeding Florida car.

Headquarters was notified, and every policeman in the city was put on the

lookout for the machine.

Block Found Wounded

Soon afterward there came to the Southern district police a report that Patrolman Block had been found with one bullet in his head and another in his chest-beside his police Car at Hanover Street and Belle Grove road.

Meanwhile, to the Southwestern district, had come an excited taxicab driver, telling of a mysterious journey he had just completed.

Picked Up Two Men

The driver, Louis Boyle, 4402 Lasalle avenue, reported that he had picked

up two fares, bearing three suitcases, on Charles street about midnight.

Pointing to a small sedan waiting at the curb, they told him, he said, to

follow it and the two cars set out for Fairfield.

On the way, he said, a Kentucky license plate dropped from the rear, of the leading machine, revealing underneath it a Florida license tag, No. 115345. He felt then, he said, that there was something queer about the whole business, but continued on his way.

Florida Car Halted

As they reached Hanover Street and Belle Grove road, he said, the Florida car was halted by a police car - which later developed to have been that of Patrolman Block.

The men in his cab, however, told him to go ahead, and he obeyed. A short distance farther on, he said, they told him to 'stop and wait. 'Ten minutes later the Florida car came up, the police were told, and his fares got out and clambered into the other machine.

Somebody in the car asked him the way to Annapolis, Boyle said, and then the machine sped away. He drove immediately to the Southwestern district police station and reported the incident - not knowing anything at all, at the time, of the shooting.

Talked To Patrolman

Sergt. Edward Pansuka, Southern district, said that he had talked to Patrolman Block only ten minutes before the shooting occurred. Block told him, he said, that he was going to the Hanover Street - Belle Grove road intersection and watch for a hold-up car. He also intended, according to the Sergeant, to tum off the traffic light at the intersection.

The point at which the cab waited for the Florida car was at Audrey street and Annapolis Boulevard, about eight' blocks beyond the scene of the shooting.

Patrolman Block, who was 33 years old, was appointed to the Police Department October 22, 1920. He resigned by request February 25, 1925, but was reinstated October 13 of the same year, being transferred from the southern to the southwestern district he lived at 6306 Frederick Ave.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten – RIP Officer John R. J. Block and God Bless - For your service "Honored" the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department"


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ALFRED P BOBELIS
23-E: 17
End of Watch: February 14, 1954
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 14 Feb 1954 we lost our brother Police Officer Alfred Bobelis to an auto accident based on the following;

On February 14, 1954 Officers Alfred Bobelis, and Marvin March, were dispatched to an accident at the intersection of Hanover and Randall Streets. Upon arrival to the scene one of the drivers of the vehicles (Calvin lucky) fled the scene for lack of a driver's license, Officer Marvin gave chase. Officer Bobelis stayed back to handle the accident and to direct traffic due to the inclement weather, and low visibility. While directing traffic at that intersection Officer Bobelis was struck by an automobile that was being operated by Earl L Kirkley Sr. a 46-year Baltimore Florist living in the 3400 block of Greenmount Avenue. Officer Bobelis was struck hard enough to throw him through the air with such force that when he landed, the impact was so strong it would fracture his skull and both legs.

Officer March succeeded in catching, and arresting Calvin Lucky, and was on his way back to the accident scene when he saw that his partner had been struck and mortally wounded. Knowing his partner was probably dead and there was little he could do, he rushed him to South Baltimore General Hospital where he would be pronounced dead on arrival.

Kirkley would eventually be convicted of manslaughter, and numerous other traffic violations. He was sentenced to three years in prison.  Over the next few months he would lose several appeals to overturn his conviction, but in December of 1954, Judge Michael J Manley in criminal court noted that he had received a number of letters attesting to Kirkley’s good character, and that defense attorneys had disclosed a civil settlement approaching $50,000 had been made to the Bobelis’ family. With this, Judge Manley reduced Earl L. Kirkley’s sentence to time served, and a $1000 fine with court costs for vehicular manslaughter in the death of Patrolman Alfred Bobelis.

Officer Bobelis was survived by his wife Emma Bobelis, and their daughters, 21-year-old Constance, and six-year-old Emily.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

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RICHARD F BOSAK
9-W: 8
End of Watch: April 18, 1968
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Baltimore Sun Article dated 04/19/1968 

A convicted narcotics user shot a homicide detective dead yesterday after the policeman wrestled him to the floor of a Eutaw street bar. The gunman died of a bullet wound in the head minutes after he killed the policeman. The convict had escaped Wednesday from a jail guard escorting him to City Hospitals for treatment. The slain policeman, Detective Patrolman Richard F. Bosak, 40, was shot three times as he wrestled on the floor of the Golden Glow Restaurant in the first block North Eutaw Street. The convict, James V. Gallaird, 29, died minutes later less than a half a block away after the slain policeman’s partner had cornered him in the Hecht Company parking lot. A parking lot attendant said Gallaird shot himself. Gallaird shot his way to temporary freedom Wednesday with a pistol slipped to him by a young woman who brushed by him and an armed guard as they were leaving City Hospitals. The City Jail inmate fired several times at the pursuing guard and one bullet harmlessly pierced the guard’s pants. Police said that yesterday shortly before 6 p.m. Patrolman Bosak and his partner in the Criminal Investigation Division’s crimes against persons section went to the Golden Glow Restaurant to check out a tip that Galliard was to meet a friend there… As the policeman and the bar owner emerged from the kitchen, Galliard and his companion broke for the door… the policeman tackled Galliard. The detective and the convict fell heavily to the floor and continued struggling. Suddenly, shots barked out. The policeman slumped down dying. Galliard freed himself, holding a long-nosed revolver in one hand and grabbing the policeman’s .38 caliber service revolver with the other.

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NORMAN FREDERICK BUCHMAN
11-W: 12
End of Watch: April 6, 1973
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Officer Norman F. Buchman. was assigned to the Northwest District, working the Operations Unit in the vicinity of the Pimlico Race Track with the primary responsibility of preventing larceny and burglary. Shortly before 3:00 p.m. on Friday afternoon, April 6, 1973, Officer Buchman observed a white and black Lincoln Mark IV wanted for traffic violations, travelling south on Greenspring Avenue. Officer Buchman followed the suspect vehicle and attempted to pull the vehicle over. Officer John Cullings and Officer Jerome Chambers of the Northern District were patrolling in the 2300 block of West Cold Spring Lane, when they observed the marked unit attempting to pull the Lincoln over. The Northern District officers, who fell in behind Officer Buchman in the chase, observed both vehicles turn west onto Loyola Southway. They then lost sight of Officer Buchman and began an area canvas in an attempt to locate and assist him. Shortly after, they heard the fatal shots ring out. They found Officer Buchman at the intersection of Pall Mall and Quantico Avenue. Officer Norman Buchman had succeeded in stopping the suspect vehicle in the 2500 Block of Quantico Avenue. As Officer Buchman approached the suspect vehicle, the suspect attacked the officer. A brief and violent struggle resulted in Officer Buchman getting knocked to the ground. At this time the suspect ripped Officer Buchman’s service revolver from his holster and shot him 6 times. Officer Cullings and Chambers arrived at the scene and placed the 23 year old suspect, who was still on the scene, under arrest and immediately called for an ambulance. Officer Buchman was transported to Sinai Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Officer Buchman was 24 years of age at the time of his death, and while he is no longer with us, he will never be forgotten, by us; his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department. RIP and God Bless, as we take this time to remember you on this sad day.

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JOHN P BURNS
41-E: 9
End of Watch: January 7, 1931
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 7 January 1931, we lost our brother Police Officer John P Burns to gunfire based on the following:

Patrolman John P. Burns, and Sergeant Alfred Plitt were patrolling in the area of St. Mary’s Street when Molly Aims ask for their protection from her live-in boyfriend, Willie Smith, who she said had been beating her all day in the house they live in at 382 St. Mary St. 

Officer Burns was quick to lead the way; followed by Sgt. Plitt, they entered the house; Smith was nowhere to be found, as they began to look around the first floor. Their eyes still adjusting from coming in out of the bright light; into the darker house, the suspect, Willie Smith came down a set of stairs from the second floor; he had a revolver in each hand, and was firing from both of them. Smith’s eyes perfectly adjusted to the limited light in the house giving him the upper hand. He waited on the stairs until the officers reached a point that had them off guard, and gave him the best advantage. Firing simultaneously from both guns, Smith began firing on the officers; Officer Burns was closest to Smith, and therefore he was first to be hit. Taking one or two rounds to the upper torso, and a round near his heart put him immediately on the floor. Following the gun battle with the on the officers, a short hand-to-hand fight breaks out between Smith and Sgt. Plitt. Plitt was buffaloed across the back of his head with one of those heavy revolvers, and knocked to the floor. Sgt. Plitt, knew he had to continue fighting, his partner was shot, and possibly dead, the suspect was still standing, and this was not how Plitt would have things end. So as Plitt, makes it back to his feet, Smith was headed out the door, and begins to exit the house. Plitt fired on Smith until he emptied his pistol as Smith went out the door, and began to run up the street. We don’t know if he hit, or missed, but we do know Smith was slowed down. As smith made his way up the street, he could only go a few houses when he decided to barricade himself under a neighbor’s rear steps. 547 Orchard St., before leaving 382 St Mary St. Smith grabbed Officer Burn’s service revolver, but for some reason he sat it on top the steps he was hiding under on Orchard St. 

Barricaded under the steps with 2 of 3 weapons, Mr. Edward T. McIntyre, a civilian employed by the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., picked up Sgt. Plitt, the two set out after the suspect in McIntyre’s automobile. Mr. McIntyre of 853 Wellington, found Plitt’s gun empty, unable to fire on Smith, he rushed the barricaded suspect, seizing the gun from on top of the steps, and shot Smith in the head; simultaneously Patrolman David S. Weed of the Northwestern District came up on Smith as he was firing shots. Smith now shot by both Mr. McIntyre, Officer Weed, and possibly Sgt. Plitt, was taken to University hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Meantime, Burns was fighting for his life at University Hospital, a call went out across the city asking officers to give blood. A pint of blood was given by Lieut. Henry Kriss of the Eastern District, as well as many other officers from East to West, and North to South, if you wore a Baltimore City Police Officer’s badge, you offered your blood to help your brother.

Sadly on this day, 1931, Officer Burns who had joined the department only ten years, and one day earlier, (January 6, 1921) would succumb to his injuries to 7 January 1931.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, and we will take this time to remember him, think of him and thank him for his service and sacrifice.


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THOMAS J BURNS
56-W: 9
End of Watch: October 1, 1948
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

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ANTHONY A BYRD
45-E: 25
End of Watch: May 19, 2006
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 19 May 2006 we lost our brother Police Officer Anthony A. Byrd died yesterday morning after his patrol car collided with one driven by Officer Raymond E. Cook Jr., who was listed in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center immediately after the accident. Earlier in the week, Anne Arundel County officers shot and killed 18-year-old Justin James Fisher after, police say, he charged at them wielding a 9-inch pair of scissors. These two events are seemingly unrelated. One happened in Baltimore and was an accident. The other occurred in a county just south of Baltimore that, in some ways, is light-years removed from what's happening on the city's streets. But the incidents highlight, once again -- and we all need reminding of this from time to time -- that a cop's job ain't like ours. You and I go to work each day, more or less assuming that when our shift ends, we'll go home. Once we arrive home, we might be greeted by loving spouses or children. We might have some dinner, watch the tube, perhaps surf the Internet. Those who work in law enforcement -- as well as firefighters and corrections officers -- probably do the same things. But they do them with a difference. We assume we're going home. They can't make the same assumption. That's why, in spite of all the second-guessing going on about Fisher's shooting, none of us can say for certain how we'd have reacted if we were the officers on the scene. And that's why we need to take a moment and reflect on the contributions to Baltimore of men like Byrd and Cook, who both worked in the Southwestern District, which has received more than its share of bad publicity and tragedy in the past two years. It was in January that residents of the Baltimore metropolitan area learned of the alleged misconduct and abuses of the Southwestern District "flex squad," a unit that focuses on drug dealing, violent crime and nuisance crimes. Officer Jemini Jones has been charged with coercing two women into having sex with him in exchange for his not charging them with a crime. Other accusations against Jones and his fellow Southwestern District flex squad members -- who have since been replaced -- include drug possession, illegal gambling, planting drugs on suspects, stealing cell phones from suspects and dropping off a suspected gang member in rival gang territory. That suspect was beaten by gang members and returned later and shot somebody in retaliation, according to a Sun report. Before Byrd, the last officer to die in Baltimore was Brian D. Winder, who was fatally shot in July of 2004. Winder also worked in the Southwestern District. Attorneys for the flex squad officers say they're all innocent. That remains to be seen. But with the charges against them, and with what happened to Winder and now Byrd and Cook, the more superstitious among us might wonder if the Southwestern District is cursed. The more rational among us will scoff at such a notion, but few would disagree that all the bad press the flex squad has received these past few months has overshadowed the work of the scores of good officers in the Southwestern District. Winder was such an officer. So was Byrd and so is Cook. Byrd was an 11-year veteran of the force. In late 1999, with only four years' experience, he was already good enough to be a training officer in the Southwestern District. That same year, Sun police reporter Peter Hermann -- now an assistant city editor -- did an article about Byrd training a rookie police officer named Bryan Ruth. One part of Hermann's article is eerily prescient, considering how Byrd met his end. For officers, coming back home is not a sure thing - archives On the second day of training, Byrd let Ruth drive the patrol car. According to Hermann's article, Ruth ran a stop sign, nearly colliding with another police cruiser.

Byrd was returning to the Southwestern District yesterday morning when the collision occurred. Cook was answering a call for back-up and was coming from district headquarters. Hermann's article is a compelling, well-written tale that illustrates just how dangerous being a cop in a city like Baltimore. No one knows that better than Cook, who survived what might have been at least his third close call in the accident. According to Sun reporter Gus Sentementes, Cook arrested three armed-robbery suspects in 1997. In a separate incident, Cook fatally shot a man who had shot a woman and then fired at the officer after a high-speed chase. Cook was decorated twice by the department for his work. Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley has urged us to pray for the families of Byrd and Cook. And well we should. Our prayers and condolences should go out to Byrd's family. Our prayers and hopes for a speedy recovery should go out to Cook's. While we're at it, we can offer up another prayer: For the entire city. One of our best officers has just gone down. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract [Anthony A. Byrd] was an 11-year veteran of the force. In late 1999, with only four years experience, he was already good enough to be a training officer in the Southwestern District. That same year, Sun police reporter Peter Hermann -- now an assistant city editor -- did an article about Byrd training a rookie police officer named Bryan Ruth. One part of Hermann's article is eerily prescient, considering how Byrd met his end. No one knows that better than [Raymond E. Cook Jr.], who survived what might have been at least his third close call in the accident. According to Sun reporter Gus Sentementes, Cook arrested three armed-robbery suspects in 1997. In a separate incident, Cook fatally shot a man who had shot a woman and then fired at the officer after a high-speed chase. Cook was decorated twice by the department for his work. Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley has urged us to pray for the families of Byrd and Cook. And well we should. Our prayers and condolences should go out to Byrd's family. Our prayers and hopes for a speedy recovery should go out to Cook's. While we're at it, we can offer up another prayer: Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. For officers, coming back home is not a sure thing

Age: 31 Tour of Duty: 11 years Cause of Death: Automobile accident Date of Incident: Friday, May 19, 2006

Officer Anthony Byrd was killed in an automobile accident near the intersection of Parksley and Stafford Street. He was returning to the station house when his patrol car was struck by another patrol car that was responding to backup an officer at a domestic disturbance call. Officer Byrd was transported to St. Agnes Hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries. Officer Byrd had served with the Baltimore Police Department for 11 years and was assigned to the Southwestern District. He is survived by his wife and two young daughters.

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HAROLD J CAREY
5-E: 21
End of Watch: October 30, 1998
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Baltimore Sun Article Dated 11/01/1998 - A Baltimore police officer’s urgent call for help led to tragedy yesterday morning when a police van and a cruiser collided at a midtown intersection, killing an officer and injuring two others, one of them seriously. Officer Harold J. Carey, a 28-year old Douglass High School graduate who studied engineering before joining the force six years ago, was killed instantly in the crash that sent his police van skidding on its side and into a wall of a senior citizens high-rise.The crushed van landed on top of a parked Chevrolet Monte Carlo, injuring its owner, who was sitting in the driver’s seat. It took firefighters an hour to extricate Carey and van’s driver, Officer Keith Owens, who suffered injuries to his head and spine. The officers were on the way to help a fellow officer who was struggling with a man on North Charles Street.Officer Carey was described by Lieutenant J. A. Chianca Jr. as a “very, very good officer” who “really cared for the people in the community.” Officer Carey was awarded a bronze star in 1993 for shooting a man armed with a .357 caliber Magnum handgun.


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JOSEPH F CARROLL
30-E: 7
End of Watch: November 19, 1928
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1928, we lost our brother Detective Sergeant Frederick W. Carroll to gunfire based on the following; On 19 Nov 1928 Captain John Carey night commander of police, received word that a man answering the description of a man wanted in New York for armed Robberies and the shooting of a New York City Police officer was in a Baltimore Street hotel. Three detectives were detailed to go to the location and bring the suspect in; Capt, Carey told them to bring the suspect to police headquarters for questioning. The detectives tried up the location, and found the person that was being reported, but felt he was not the suspect wanted, by NYPD. Captain Carey said he told the three officers sent earlier of the dangers of this suspect, and let them know he was a dangerous and desperate character. While the Detectives didn’t think the guy they received a tip on was their suspect they still brought him in for questioning where they cleared him, and released him shortly after.

Later the same morning Detective Sergeant Frederick W. Carroll received a phoned in tip of a suspect at a downtown hotel, he didn’t have any info on the suspect, what he was wanted for, or even that three Detectives had already gone out on this call. All he had was that police where there earlier looking for a suspect, and that the suspect was there now. Det. Sgt. F. Carroll then left; he didn’t know it was guys out of his own unit/division that went. We don’t know who phoned in the tip, it may have been the person police brought in, and then released, or a hotel employee; we’ll never know. Likewise we’ll never know why, Detective Sergeant Frederick W. Carroll didn’t look into it any further, or didn’t take back-up. He just took the name the caller gave him, grabbed a set of keys, and went alone… While at the hotel he located the suspect, and arrested him. The two proceeded from the hotel to as far as Fayette Street, and the Fallsway when the suspect pulled a pistol, and demanded that Detective Sergeant Carroll put his hands up. Detective Sergeant Elmer O’Grady and Detective Joseph Carroll, who were looking out a window of the police building, and ran out to assist Det. Sgt F. Carroll, only to be met by the gunman’s fire. Det. Sgt. Frederick Carroll died a few minutes after being taken to the hospital. Oh, Grady and Joseph Carroll, were reported as doing well.

Several things that should be known about the Baltimore Police 1928, one we didn’t cuff people in public, 2nd, we didn’t search people in public, nor did we stand by and watch as other searched people in public. To that the commissioner Charles Gaither read the following from the rule book to the media:

“Members of the force shall not search, or act as witness to the searching of any person in any place other than the station house, or headquarters, unless such search be made for dangerous or deadly weapons suspected to be upon the person of the prisoner.”

In this case Det. Sgt. F Carroll had no info on the suspect, and was within the rules of the Baltimore Police Department. It is because of cases like this, that we have the rules we have today, cases like this, that lets us cuff people that are only suspected of a crime. And cases like this that let us search incident to arrest. This happened in 1928, things were so different, without radios on every shoulder, or hip like today, information wasn’t as freely distributed as it is today.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

The suspect in this case also died of his injuries, but not before admitting to police that he was the suspect wanted in New York for robberies and Shootings, of two police officers in the NYPD

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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TROY LAMONT CHESLEY SR
8-W: 26
End of Watch: January 9, 2007
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Age: 34 - Tour of Duty: 13 years - Cause of Death: Gunfire - Date of Incident: Tuesday, January 9, 2007  

A 13-year-veteran of the Baltimore Police Department was shot to death as he walked up to his girlfriend's home in Northwest Baltimore early this morning, shortly after he got off work. Det. Troy Lamont Chesley Sr., 34, suffered multiple gunshot wounds and was pronounced dead at Sinai Hospital, police officials said. He was shot by one or more gunmen who approached him as he walked in the 5400 block of Fairfax Road, a quiet residential street in the city's West Forest Park neighborhood. The shooting came amid a spate of slayings -- 10 in the first nine days of the new year. Troy was laid to eternal rest January 16, 2007

Suspect In Killing Has Long Record ; Man, 21, Charged With Police Officer's Slaying Has Been Arrested Often, Convicted Several Times

Gus G. Sentementes / Annie Linskey

Jan 10, 2007

A 21-year-old man with at least 17 arrests on his criminal record was charged yesterday with first-degree murder in the killing of an off-duty Baltimore police officer during an apparent robbery attempt outside the officer's girlfriend's home in Northwest Baltimore. The suspect, Brandon Grimes, was being held under police guard at a city hospital, recovering from a leg wound that police said was sustained during an early-morning gunbattle with Detective Troy Lamont Chesley Sr., 34, who was struck several times and died at Sinai Hospital.

Police said Grimes escaped in the chaotic moments after the 1:20 a.m. shooting on a quiet street in West Forest Park that left cars and houses pockmarked by bullets. Detectives closed in on the suspect after they learned someone had been admitted to St. Agnes Hospital with a gunshot injury. Police said they recovered key evidence, including a handgun and blood from the scene that did not belong to the officer.

The day - in which the city's homicide total for this year rose to 13 - left Baltimore officers grieving and frustrated over Grimes' extensive record of arrests. Despite several convictions, he had not spent significant time in prison. Col. Fred H. Bealefeld III, chief of detectives, noted that Grimes had been arrested twice within the past year for handgun violations; court records show those cases are pending.

"This is the third gun Brandon Grimes has had in his possession in less than a year," Bealefeld said. "We took two of them away from him. It's extraordinary, to say the least. This is the sort of mayhem and craziness we see all too often." Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm said that officials who participate in the city's Criminal Justice Coordinating Council - a group of elected officials, law enforcement agency representatives and others - "need to start getting serious about getting people off the street." Hamm said Grimes' 17 arrests occurred over the past 3 1/2 years. "I think that what has to happen is that the city of Baltimore has to get fed up, because we are fed up," he said.

Asked about the city's stubborn homicide rate, the commissioner said: "When this pager goes off at night telling me someone's been killed in this city, I die a little bit. Everybody dies a little bit." The officer's death highlighted another pervasive problem that city police have struggled with over the past year: robberies. In 2006, according to preliminary figures through mid-December, the city saw a roughly 8 percent spike in robberies - an increase that mirrored a troubling national trend. Chesley was attacked in the 4500 block of Fairfax Road, outside his girlfriend's house. Less than two months ago, and two blocks away, Andre Alexander, 21, was killed in front of his house by someone who shot him about 1:25 a.m. and then ran away. Police officials said yesterday that they are looking at that case - which remains open - to see if there are any similarities to yesterday's shooting, which left residents once again stunned. Kelly Lloyd, a neighbor who lives in the block, said she heard nine or 10 gunshots in what is a usually quiet neighborhood. "I was shocked," she said. "I thought it was firecrackers. They shot a lot of times." Chesley, who was in plain clothes and not wearing body armor, was pronounced dead soon after his arrival at Sinai, police said. Police said they believe that the suspect, after getting shot in the lower leg, limped away from the scene and was taken to St. Agnes Hospital by other unidentified people in a minivan. His condition was not available. Police said it was too early to determine whether other people would be charged in the slaying. Chesley, a Baltimore native, joined the Police Department in 1993. He served in the Western and Northwestern districts, and later in tactical and organized crime units. Most recently, he worked in the department's public housing section, doing undercover drug investigations in the some of the city's most dangerous neighborhoods.

Relatives of Chesley declined to comment.

Law enforcement officials yesterday scrambled to understand and explain Grimes' extensive and convoluted criminal record. The city state's attorney's office released a timeline that showed Grimes pleading guilty to car theft in February 2004 and receiving a 10- year sentence. But that sentence was almost entirely suspended, and Grimes was put on probation. A separate hearing last May on his violating an earlier probation led a city judge to sentence Grimes to four concurrent sentences of six months; after Grimes served that sentence, his case was closed and his probation was terminated by a judge, court records show, though the reason for that disposition could not be determined yesterday. A handwritten letter that Grimes wrote to the judge before the sentencing indicated that he has a young son and had been working toward a high school graduate equivalency diploma. He asked the judge for leniency, because his son needed him in his life. "I'm writing this letter to you to ask for Mercy on the Court," Grimes wrote in the letter, full of grammatical errors. "I know a lot of choices I made in my life wasn't the right ones. But I had to realize I'm not just living for myself any more. I have a 6 mouth old son that need me in his life and I can't be there for him if I die or in jail." In March and April last year, Grimes was arrested and charged with separate handgun violations. Grimes posted bail for the March case, which is pending trial. For the April arrest, the state's attorney's office argued for bail of $500,000 bail, but a District Court commissioner reportedly reduced his bail to $100,000. That case was postponed at least twice and scheduled for trial today. A prosecutor argued in a court document that "Mr. Grimes' continuing insistence on illegally carrying handguns indicates the danger he poses to the citizens of Baltimore city, requiring the highest possible bail," according to the form. In that same document, a prosecutor stated that Grimes had been previously found guilty of obliterating the serial number of a handgun. Other charges last year included second-degree assault and reckless endangerment in June, which were dismissed by prosecutors for unspecified reasons, and two separate arrests for drugs and burglary in November, court records show. Grimes also had an extensive criminal record as a juvenile. At age 12, in 1997, Grimes was charged with making a bomb threat. That same year, he would also be arrested as a juvenile and charged with extortion, second-degree assault and a pyrotechnic violation, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of his juvenile record. From 1999 to 2001, he was arrested four times in car-theft cases, the source said. The attack on Chesley was the latest in a string of dangerous assaults against on- and off-duty Baltimore police officers over the past year. Last month, Officer Momodu Gondo was shot and injured in North Baltimore in an apparent robbery attempt. Police made an arrest in that case. In November, Sgt. Christopher Nyberg shot two of four people who tried to rob him as he walked toward his home in Federal Hill. Police said Nyberg was held up at knifepoint. In September, Officer Robert G. Cirello was shot while patrolling Patterson Park, and police credited his body armor with saving his life. And in March, Officer Dante Hemingway was shot in the neck, chest and stomach in Westport when, on his lunch break, he visited a woman he had met and was shot by a man recruited by the woman's jealous lover. The last officer to die in the line of duty was Officer Anthony A. Byrd, 31, an 11-year veteran. Byrd was killed in May in a collision with another officer, Raymond E. Cook Jr., who was speeding in his police cruiser. Byrd was survived by a wife and two young daughters. Paul M. Blair Jr., president of the city's Fraternal Order of Police union, said that an officer has been assigned to assist Chesley's family, and the union will help relatives with funeral arrangements. He said Chesley's death will be considered a "line of duty" fatality because he drew his weapon and badge. "It's bad enough we're targeted at work," Blair said, "but now it's so bad that you can't even go home safely at night." Lt. Melvin Russell, who was Chesley's boss for years in the close- knit narcotics unit in the public housing section, addressed Chesley's colleagues in the unit yesterday morning. "I told them to keep a careful eye on each other," he said. "As police officers, we tend to hold things inside. I reminded them that we're human beings first ... and to try not to go through this by themselves."

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JOHN CHRISTOPHER
21-W: 10
End of Watch: August 18, 1872
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History, 18 Aug 1872 we lost our brother, Patrolman John Christopher. Patrolman Christopher was lost to gunfire. It started out as a cloud of dust being thrown up by two young wagon men as they raced their teams neck and neck down a dirt road near Catonsville’s Railway Park. The drivers cursing their horses, and one another in a race where friendly competition quickly ended as both James Ford, and James Dorsey cracked the reins from their wagons into their animal’s necks, and backs in order to gain speed. Each struggled more and more to go faster, each had nothing more in mind than to win that race, and to try to overtake the other. The race had begun at, “Kelly’s Woods” in Catonsville, and was nearing the City/County line near Western’s District. It was in that park, near the old Western, that the two men stopped, and an argument ensued. The two young men argued like they raced, they were loud, and each wanted nothing more than to win. They each wanted that win so much so, that their actions drew the attention of Baltimore City Patrolman, John Christopher. As Patrolman Christopher neared Ford, and Dorsey; they began to physically fight, each throwing blow, after blow at the other. Baltimore Police have not changed much in the 141 years since this incident; police were strong, often relying on the use of brute strength to overcome the situations they found themselves in. On this particular day in 1872, things were not much different, Patrolmen Christopher single handedly separated the combatants, and forced them back into their wagons and on their way. To keep the peace, Patrolman Christopher climbed into James Ford’s wagon with him, and rode with him toward his destination with efforts to maintain peace.

Despite Patrolman Christopher’s best efforts, the two drivers resumed their argument which escalated quickly into a fight. Dorsey began throwing stones at Ford, and warned him that if he bumped into his wagon again, he would shoot him. The fisticuffs resumed, and Dorsey started to live up to his promise of shooting Ford as he pulled a pistol. Patrolman Christopher saw the weapon, and once again gained control over the more violent of the men by forcefully throwing him from his wagon to the ground. That momentary separation was lost when Ford dove onto Dorsey and went for his gun. Before Patrolman Christopher could regain control over either of the men the pistol was fired once. Even while Dorsey’s anger was focused on Ford, the bullet left his weapon and found its way into the stomach of Officer Christopher, causing severe pain, and what would become a fatal injury. Patrolman Christopher felt the burn in his stomach as he fell to the ground.

Our Brother Patrolman John Christopher was quickly taken to the house of “Justice Pilot” where he was treated by “Dr. Worsham”. “Justice Pilot”, and “John Young”, responded to the scene of the shooting where they were able to apprehend, and arrest both, “James Dorsey” and “James Ford”. Patrolman Christopher made a positive ID, and was taken to his home located at, 14 South Fremont St. where he was cared for by, “Prof. J. H. Butler”. His injuries were painful and they were fatal, leaving the medical professionals in a place where no matter what they could have done they were unable to save his life. Patrolman Christopher lay in pain from the night of the shooting on 18 Aug, until the day he passed away on 23, Aug. 1872 at approx. 3:30 in the afternoon.

As his brothers and sisters, of the Baltimore Police Department it is up to us to make sure he is never forgotten. For his service honored the City of Baltimore, and Baltimore Police Department. May God be with him, so that me may rest in peace.


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JOSEPH CLARK
47-E: 14
End of Watch: May 22, 1871
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1871 (22 May 1871) We lost our brother Patrolman Joseph Clark to gunfire based on the following: 
Baltimore Sun paper 24 May 1871 - Headline LOCAL MATTERS;

The wonton and cold-blooded shooting of Patrolman Joseph C. Clarke on Monday night 22 May 1871) by Frederick M Kusey as detailed in the Monday night May 23rd Sun-Paper yesterday gave rise to considerable feelings during the day in the community. The body of the deceased was at an early hour removed to his late residence number 172 is for Avenue Policeman Clark was a very worthy citizen, and a good officer. He leaves as before stated a wife, and nine children as well as his grandchildren. The alleged murder Frederick M. Kusey said to belong to Philadelphia was arrested about 6 AM yesterday by policeman Bradley, McGuire and Chew and on the warrant of Coroner Spacer was committed to jail to wait the selection of the grand jury Kusey is a young man about 23 years of age rather spare, and about 5’8” in height. It appeared that on Monday night after committing the deed to see escaped from the premise number 28 Center St. by a gate leading out to Holliday Street without his hat. He first went to the labor house By Voechell on the corner of Franklin and North Streets where he procured a hat, and about midnight when all the spare men of the police force were searching for him, he appeared at that lighter beer saloon of Mr. Johnson under the mansion house corner of St. Paul and Fayette Streets and asked for and obtained a drink. He here said that he had gotten himself into a scrape, that he had shot a policeman, and then displayed the pistol with which he alleged the shooting was done he then complained of being tired and having no money he borrowed $.50 with which to pay for a bed at the mansion house. Mr. Johnson had not learned of the murder, and was disposed not to believe Kusey, to see but early hour yesterday morning on reading the account of the affair in the Sun he at once gave information to Policeman Bradley, who calling to his assistance acquire and chew proceeded to the room of Kusey and arrested him as he was about leaving the bed.

The accused made no resistance. He had in his possession a cold seven shooter, three chambers on which had been discharged and three were still loaded. The four female witnesses against the accused were Annie Lawrence alias Chenoweth, Molly Rogers, Sally Cain and Lizzie Shirley, were also committed to jail by corner Spicer but for the latter being in delicate health was sent to Washington University hospital. Corner Spicer held a postmortem examination of the body of policeman Clark yesterday previous to the removal from Mr. Weavers. He found that the ball which had entered the mouth of the deceased had buried itself in the left jawbone, the second ball penetrated the left breast pass through the long and out the back cutting the spinal ulterior and causing instant death from internal hemorrhage. The other ball passed through his hat grazing in his head.

Kusey is a bartender and has been employed in several public houses in the city. After his committal to jail and in fact from being the time of his arrest he said nothing as to the motive that led to the commission of this fearful crime with which he stands charge except when questioned by Capt. Mitchell of the middle district who asked the prisoner when induced him to slay the policeman Kusey  then answered, “I don’t know what I must have been drinking or crazy.” Capt. Mitchell replied “your subsequent conduct did not indicate that you are either drunk or crazy.” The prisoner answered, “then I wish it had been myself that I had shot.”

From conversations with the four women witnesses, as well as from the testimony before the corner, the concise of Mount of the murder is made Annie Lawrence alias John Willis is the keeper of the house number 23 Center St. and Frederick M Casey lives there that is the Shirley, Sally Cain and Molly Rogers were roommates of the house the accused have given the ladies much trouble by demanding money from her when intoxicated, about three weeks since C caused his arrest and committal to jail in order to avoid his annoyance. On Monday night he again became troublesome in his demands for money, and was so threatening that she ordered Sally who had charge of the bar to close it would she did taking the money from the tour with her and locking it herself in her room Mrs. Lawrence then went out the back gate to look for an officer.  Kusey followed her and locking her out he then ran out to the light and went to her bedroom on the second floor and when she returned with policeman Clark and on knocking was let in by one of the girls, everything was dark on getting upstairs she proposed to get a light when Clark told her he had a match on going into the room Kusey was found standing with his boots and hat off clerk told him to put his boot one as he must go with him Kusey replied with an raids when he was again told he must go Kusey Casey then told Lizzie Shelley to go downstairs for his hat. When he’s soon thereafter fired two shots the third as she was going up the steps with the hat the three women made their escape the murdered man fell to the floor of the steps and Kusey then went up to the room of the female bartender and demanded whatever money she had which she had locked up in her trunk and refused to give him the key Kusey then ran downstairs over the body of Clark made his escape and was arrested as above stated. All the witnesses concur in the statement that Kusey had a great antipathy to all who wore the police uniform and invariably calling them “speckled ones”.

The house number 23 Center St. in which the tragedy occurred is a three-story brick the lower floor being used as a barroom it is in position of the police authorities a policeman being stationed on the premise day and night numbers of morbid curiosity hunters visited the spot yesterday, but no one was permitted to enter the premises except officers. Msgr. Fusselbaugh, car and Morris of the police commissioners and Mr. M Boswell, their clerk work early at the scene of the murder, and during the entire night worked with the police and looking up the perpetrator. It was at first suggested that the murder had escaped to the top of the home and Mr. Carr obtained a ladder made a personal examination of the roof the police authorities were greatly aided by Mr. John W Davie Esq. late police Commissioner. Who subsequently acted as foreman of the coroner’s jury. Marshal gray and deputy Marshall fre were also very active during the night as in fact were all officers and men to the middle district the funeral of policeman Clark takes place at 3 PM today and will be attended by the police board and all of the police force that can be spared from duty the deceased was a strict member of the Roman Catholic Church

While he is no longer with us, we his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. RIP Brother


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JACK LEE COOPER
17-W: 3
End of Watch: December 25, 1964
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Appointed: December 18, 1947
Assigned: Northeastern District
Died: December 25, 1964
Length of Service: 17 years
Baltimore Sun Article Dated 12/26/1964 

A police Sergeant was shot to death early yesterday as he was searching for a bandit who had wounded a police lieutenant in a Christmas Eve liquor store hold up. Sgt. Jack L. Cooper, 43, was shot twice through the heart shortly before 5 a.m. as he was working by himself in the 2600 Block of Kennedy Avenue. Lt. Joseph T. Maskell, 40, was shot twice but was not fatally wounded as he struggled with the bandit shortly before 10 p.m. Christmas Eve outside a liquor store in the 2000 Block of Greenmount Avenue. He was in fair condition at St. Joseph’s Hospital. Police said Sergeant Cooper apparently had stopped a 25-year old man identified by witnesses as one of four men who robbed the liquor store proprietor and several of his customers of $2,399.80. Police found a black leather card case containing the name of the 25-year-old man lying near Sergeant Cooper’s body. They also found a driver’s license issued to the same man lying on the floor of his police car near the clutch pedal. Sergeant Cooper’s pistol was still in its holster when he was found sprawled on the sidewalk about 10 feet from the open door of his car. About 4:45 a.m., Sergeant Cooper and Patrolman Charles Kopfelder and Daniel Sobolewski met in the 1600 Block of Carswell Street, about eight blocks northeast from the holdup scene. The two patrolmen left in their police car to cruise along Gorsuch Avenue. They last saw the sergeant sitting alone in his car. Just before 4:50 a.m. they heard shots and hurried back to the 1600 Block of Carswell Street. They found Sergeant Cooper lying on the sidewalk in the 2600 Block of Kennedy Avenue. He was bleeding from three bullet wounds. The done light of his police car was turned on. Both Sergeant Cooper and Lieutenant Makell worked out of the Northeastern District. Sgt. Cooper served in the U.S. Coast Guard from June 3, 1941 to November 1945, he served in the North Atlantic convoy routes, and was discharged as Radio Man, First Class. One retired Sgt. wrote on the Christmas killing of our brother Sgt Cooper that someone else was correct in their beliefs that Sgt. Cooper was Shot and Killed by one of the Veney Brothers (Sam and Earl) "Yes, it was the Veney brothers, I was a patrolman at the time in the Northern Distirct, working for Joe Maskellwhen he was a Sergeant in the Northern. I gave a pint of blood at St. Joes, The Liquor store was Lexie's and was always being held up. After the shooting, and during the months of searching for the Veney brothers we must have raided every house in the area at one time or another. First time and last time I ever carried a Thompson 45 cal machine gun. The truck would pull up to a corner and we would all line up and be issued shotguns or Thompson's and be told what we were going to hit. We would raid a whole block, kick in all the doors and start searching. I was with George Shriner one time and remember his placing his Thompson near a sleeping man's mouth and when the guy woke up he raised his head and it was as if he could have rammed the gun into his throat. I still can't figure out how someone wasn't killed during that time. The thing about it was it was a different time, there were so many tips coming in and none of us knew what was being said, or by who, all we knew, was they shot two of ours killing one, and none of us wanted to be next. One of the Veney's was arrested in New York State and living disguised as a woman. The ACLU took the Baltimore Police Department to the Supreme Court protesting the tactics used to find these jerks. The results changed the probable cause for searching for suspects in the future. No more anonymous tip searches. Years later after I retired, I was the Director of Security at Lexington Market and I happened to hear that one of the Veney's was cashing pay checks at the market. . Someone dropped a dime to the right person and a big stink was made. His work release suddenly stopped.
From this I learned what to look for and found the following: The Veney Brothers were Sam and Earl Veney, Sam actually pulled the trigger on that night ruining a lot of lives. The following information might be of some interest, it was found in Baltimore Sun archives
Joseph T. Maskell, 73, Officer Shot in the Notorious 1964 Case
 April 17, 1998|By Fred Rasmussen | Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF

Joseph T. Maskell, a retired Baltimore police lieutenant who was shot in a 1964 robbery that began the notorious Veney brothers case, died of lung cancer April 10 1998 at his Mount Washington home. He was 73. Lieutenant Maskell joined the Police Department in 1946 and, after recovering from his wounds, retired in 1966. He became an adjuster for an insurance company and was appointed vice president of marketing at Freestate Adjusting Co. in 1979. He retired again in 1986 and was a rental car salesman until 1990 About 10 p.m. on Christmas Eve in 1964, Lieutenant Maskell, assigned to the Northeastern District, responded to a call about a robbery in progress at the Luxies Liquor store in the 2000 block of Greenmount Ave. "He saw something going on and walked right into a robbery. He was shot twice, and then he staggered to Worsley Street, about 25 feet from Greenmount Avenue, where he was later found," said Bill Rochford, a police lieutenant at the time. "It was a miracle he survived." said Mr. Rochford, a boyhood friend who grew up with Lieutenant Maskell in Northeast Baltimore. Samuel J. Veney and Earl Veney became the targets of the city's largest manhunt. The Veneys made the FBI's 10-most-wanted list, the first time two brothers had been on the list. "The search was intense and went on through the night and into Christmas morning, when Sgt. Jack Lee Cooper was killed by Samuel Veney," said Bill Talbott, a retired Evening Sun reporter who covered the case. During the 19-day manhunt, police searched 200 homes in black communities without obtaining search warrants. The illegal searches prompted the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to file a federal lawsuit that resulted in an 1966 injunction against the city police. The Veney brothers, who had fled the state, were captured in March 1965 while working in a zipper factory on Long Island, N.Y. They were tried and convicted in Frederick, where the case was moved because of pretrial publicity. Earl Veney was sentenced to 30 years in prison and in 1976 was found hanged in the House of Correction in Jessup, where Samuel Veney is serving a life sentence. Lieutenant Maskell was awarded two official commendations and received 10 letters of commendation. "He was a very decent guy who never really held any animosity about what happened," Mr. Rochford said. "I think the only regret he had was the fact that it ended his career. In later years, he really never talked about it." Retired Sun reporter Robert A. Erlandson said, "He was the prototypical Irish cop with a big smile and very caring and most of all was well-liked." A 1942 graduate of City College, Lieutenant Maskell served in the Army Coast Artillery from 1942 to 1945 and was discharged as a staff sergeant. He earned a law enforcement certificate from the University of Maryland in 1963. Graveside services were held Monday. He is survived by his wife of 46 years, the former Gloria Bauer; three daughters, Cynthia DiLiello of Jarrettsville, Mindy Sturgis of Joppatowne and JoAnne Bell of Fallston; and nine grandchildren.

Sam Veney get's Death Sentence
Afro American Newspaper

FREDERICK - Samuel Jefferson Veney, 27, convicted of the Christmas, 1964 murder of Police Sgt. Jack Lee Cooper. must die in the gas chamber. So ruled a two-judge Frederick County Circuit Court panel here late Monday. Sam, the second half of the first brother team ever to make the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list,stood Impassively as Judge J. Dudley Diggs pronounced the Supreme penalty. Execution or sentence will be delayed pending outcome of an appeal to Md. Court of Appeals. Charges of armed robbery and shooting with intent to murder Police Lt. Joseph T. Maskell were stetted by Baltimore State's Attorney Charles E. Moylan, who headed the week-long prosecution before a two-woman and ten-man jury which returned the verdict offirst degree murder guilt. While imposing sentence Judge Diggs said he and associate Judge Robert E. Clapp Jr. decreed the death penalty after "consciously and unconsciously" searching their minds and concluding there was no justification for not imposing capital punishment. Chief defense counsel John R. Hargrove, arguing against the extreme penalty said Sam should not be made a ''scapegoat" while others involved in the crime are out walking the streets. Mr. Moylan, on the other hand declaredthat he could not think of any case where the death penalty would be imposed if it were not imposed in a case of the convicted police killer. Mr. Hargrove, noted an immediate intention to appeal.
Putting a Price Tag on that which is Priceless -- Life Itself

May 12, 1993|By Gregory P. Kane

CONVICTED cop killer Samuel Veney, who was returned to a Maryland prison Monday, walked away the same weekend two Los Angeles police officers were found guilty of violating Rodney King's civil rights. That was a coincidence, but both Sam Veney and Rodney King were involved in cases where police misconduct became at least as notorious as the misdeeds of either man. Before his brutal beating, King had led police and highway patrolmen on a high-speed car chase. He was quite drunk at the time. My guess is that he had broken at least four laws by the time of his arrest, crimes that were all but forgotten in the furor that resulted from the video of those 82 seconds it took police to subdue him. The case of Sam Veney and his brother Earl is different because their crime was more heinous. They gunned down two Baltimore Police -- killing one and wounding another -- while robbing a liquor store on Greenmount Avenue. The Veney brothers were probably the most notorious and feared criminals in Baltimore history, but police misconduct figured prominently in their crime, too. After the shootings, the Baltimore Police Department declared war on the city's black population. Police broke into scores of homes without warrants or the slightest pretext of probable cause. The search teams were called "flying squads," as delicate a euphemism for police state terror as it should ever be our disgust to encounter. Juanita Jackson Mitchell had to take city police to federal court and remind them that Baltimore was in America, not Nazi Germany or the Stalinist Soviet Union. As a young boy living in the Murphy Homes housing project at the time, I vividly remember wondering whether I had more to fear from the Veney brothers or Baltimore Police. Years later remember thinking that whatever the iniquities of the Veney brothers, it was their act that had exposed the Baltimore Police Department for its brutal, racist treatment of Baltimore's black citizens in 1964 and before. Should we forget how bad it was, we need only remind ourselves that Commissioner Donald Pomerleau -- hardly a flaming liberal -- was brought in to nudge the department into the 20th century. Now Sam Veney comes back to haunt us again. It seems that every time a Veney screws up, a larger issue is brought into focus. The issue this time is the parole policy of the state of Maryland. Many were wondering -- Evening Sun columnist Dan Rodricks among them -- why a lifer like Veney who was not being considered for parole was given weekend home visiting privileges. I'm sure Sam Veney looked at the situation differently, as did his family. He figured that with a good behavior record and a 10-year history of returning from weekend visits, why shouldn't he be considered for parole? So old Sam simply initiated self-parole. And to give the devil his due, Sam Veney has a point. Yes, he killed a cop. Yes, he was given a life term. But everyone in the state knows that some murderers are given life terms and then are paroled. Others, like Sam Veney, are given life sentences and won't ever be considered for parole. The criteria for determining which murderers get paroled and which do not sound good -- prior criminal record, the impact on the victim's family, the convict's progress while in prison -- but ultimately lead to charges that the race, class and occupation of the victim come into the equation. How it is that Sam Veney can see the absurdity of such a policy and we civilized, law-abiding citizens can't? All murder victims are equally dead. There are none deader than others. If some lifers have a shot at parole, all should have a shot. Or none should have a shot. Equally absurd is the case of Terrence Johnson, sentenced to 25 years for killing two Prince George's County police officers. Johnson has been a model prisoner for years, even taking the time to further his education while in prison. But don't look for him to be paroled. Gov. William Donald Schaefer found the heart to pardon women convicted of killing husbands and boyfriends on the grounds that the women had suffered brutality at the hands of the men. Even though the prosecution in Johnson's case conceded the cops were brutalizing him at the time of the killings, the governor apparently can't see any justification for granting Johnson not a pardon, but a parole. We ought to be concerned that Maryland law allows for the parole of murderers given life sentences. As former city police commissioner, state public safety commissioner and current Mercy Hospital brain surgery patient Bishop L. Robinson has pointed out, if we don't want murderers paroled after they've been handed life sentences, we need only express our wishes to our state legislators and get them to work changing the law. Let's put a no-parole-for-lifers law on the books. Paroling some murderers and denying parole to others puts a price tag on that which should be priceless -- human life. http://baltimorecitypolicedept.org/citypolice/images/Sunpaper%20pics/1img085.jpg

 
Ex-officer remembers Veney raids held in 1964

June 09, 2001|By Gregory Kane

WHAT, SOME curious readers have asked, were the Veney raids?

I'm older than I'd like to think. At one time, most Baltimoreans knew what the Veney raids were. As those of us in the baby boomer generation get older, we assume those younger know what we know. We assume that events from December 1964 are common knowledge. But they aren't. Sam and Earl Veney robbed a liquor store in December 1964. The two black men also shot two police officers, killing one. They were caught and convicted. But the police manhunt in Baltimore for the Veney brothers became almost as infamous as their crimes. Without warrants, police broke into scores of homes in black neighborhoods. (Some put the number as high as 300.) Some critics protested that the raids were a widespread violation of civil liberties. Federal courts and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People had to get involved. In a recent column, I referred to the Veney raids as "notorious." One man who remembers the raids well - much better than 13-year-old Gregory Kane could have - took umbrage with the use of the word. He's Paul Lioi, now retired and living in Florida. In December 1964 he was 25-year-old Officer Paul Lioi of the Baltimore Police Department. He sent this letter to The Sun: "That [notorious] remark hit a sensitive chord with me," Lioi wrote. "Let's go back to 1964. It was Christmas Eve, and the children of two police officers wrapped their fathers' gifts and went to bed and could hardly wait until morning when their daddies would return home from work to open their gifts and celebrate Christmas together. This was not to be, because one daddy, a police lieutenant, was shot and wounded during a hold-up at a liquor store on Greenmount Avenue. "And later that same day, the second daddy, a police sergeant, was killed. Neither family celebrated Christmas that day, and for one family, Christmas and every day thereafter, the dad would no longer be with them. The investigation at the robbery scene revealed that the suspects responsible for the robbery and shooting of a police lieutenant were the Veney brothers. As the police went looking for the brothers one of [them] shot and killed a police sergeant. Two police officers shot, one seriously wounded and one killed. They happened to be my lieutenant and sergeant. "The police department went on a manhunt to try and locate and apprehend these police assassins known as the Veney brothers. They felt compelled to follow up on any lead they received. The tips they received came from the black community. I was part of the raiding party and felt that the tips received were authentic." Its 37 years later, and Lioi - who won four Bronze Stars, a Distinguished Service Medal and the Medal of Honor in his police career - knows that many of the tips were nowhere near authentic. "Most turned out to be bogus," Lioi said yesterday from his Orlando home. The reason baffles him. This was a search for cop-shooters. "Why," Lioi wondered, "were they giving us these bogus tips?" Lioi also feels empathy with those who lived in the raided homes. "Come to think of it," he said, "it was a bad thing. We had our guns pointed at the houses. We weren't going to walk up to a suspect and say, `Sir, are you Mr. Veney?'" Lioi says he arrested one of the Veney brothers - he doesn't remember which one - several months before that fateful Christmas Eve. He and his partner - whose regular beat included the liquor store that was robbed - were off the night the store was robbed. He often wonders what would have happened if they had been working instead of Lt. Joseph Maskell, who was wounded in the liquor store robbery, and Sgt. Jack Lee Cooper, whom Sam Veney fatally shot after Cooper confronted him in East Baltimore. "He was a decent guy, a real gentleman," Lioi said of Cooper. "His death just about ruined my Christmas. I went up to my room and closed my door because I didn't want my children to see a grown man cry. And I did." Other memories of his East Baltimore beat are happier. He remembers when he was "fighting some mental case" and, unable to call for assistance, finally received it when concerned residents called for him. And he became a fan of legendary black comedian Jackie "Moms" Mabley while walking his beat on the graveyard shift. "It was about two in the morning," Lioi recalled. "I was walking by this house and the door was open. I heard a comedian doing a routine." He listened a bit and was delighted to hear one of the funniest comedians he'd ever come across in his life. A woman who lived in the house told him who it was and where to buy the album. The next day, Lioi was in a store on Greenmount Avenue, buying it. When his beat-walking days were over, he was promoted to sergeant and later became a detective with the arson squad. He retired in 1984 after 23 years on the force. Lioi offers no apologies for his role in the Veney raids. It was mischievous tipsters, he insists, who were responsible. But that may be why the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was critical of the raids. Federal judges realize that any crackpot can give a tip and lead even good cops to do bad things.

I read both stories and on the one hand I applaud (if you can applaud with one had) the work of G Kane for telling the story, but to compare a traffic violation with a cop killer, and the laws and rules of 1964 Baltimore to 1992/93 LA is wrong, in one case no one was killed and several officers lost their jobs, as they should have. But what happened in 1964 Baltimore, involved as Officer Lioi explains, the public dropping bad tips to get police reaction. In 1964 Baltimore Police didn't have body armor, so when they had to go in after suspects that had shot one officer and killed another, ringing the doorbell, was out of the question... It is so easy to sit back and Monday morning quarterback what people do for a living; in some cases the public forgets police get killed, they die and there is no reset button. The public demands protection from their police, and in 1964 the Veney Brothers were bad news, so to send police in after two brothers that they know will kill them if given the chance, police did what they had to, and were trained to in order to protect the public... Keep in mind that was 1964, if that were today, then of course it would have been done differently, heck if it were 1992/93 it would have been handled differently. But let's face it, it wasn't today, it wasn't 1992/93 and things were different back then, to compare cop killers to a traffic violation is wrong. The police reaction in once case was to stop and arrest a suspect for poor driving, the other was to bring in two cop killers and go home alive. To compare the two is more than apples oranges, it is disrespectful to the families of these officers, and every officer that had, or has since put on the badge. If it were cop killers in my neighborhood hiding out, the police wouldn't have to kick my door in, they would be welcomed to come in and check anytime. So often the public become so discontent with police that they will find fault in their every move, even things that happened before the officer they are dealing with ever set foot on the job. But they don't realize is, every officer on the job, risks his or her life every time they go to work, and they do it so we can be safe. If people would cooperate with police and call when they see something wrong, not call in for jokes, or to have a neighbor they don't like raided. All neighborhoods would be equal. But that's just my opinion.
Robert F. Kennedy said, "Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on." Which goes alone the lines of the false tips 1964 Baltimore put up with, it's not income that has some criminals living in some areas over others, nor is it income that increases the number of police in an area. In fact most good neighborhoods have less police than some of the worse neighborhoods. So how does this work, why does it work like this, because in the better neighboods, when someone hangs on the corner, the police are called the people chased off etc. If someone if holding a gun, police are called and before long people stop holding guns in that area, or hanging on the corner. Basically cooperating with police letting them know who is doing what and where will get people out of certain areas. At a meeting in Baltimore County we were told if we want more police we have to call the police more often when we see crime, but if we are not seeing crime then more police won't be needed. And in my neighborhood, if kids hang on corners police are called, if someone steals a bike, the police are told who took it and where they put it. Police aren’t mind readers, if we want our neighborhoods safe, we need to report what we know, if we don't we'll end with that type criminal living in our area (we welcome them by not letting police know they are unwelcomed) the more we cooperate with police, the better quality police service we'll have too... Bobby Kennedy may have been onto something.


http://baltimorecitypolicedept.org/citypolice/images/Veney%20Brothers.jpg
Photos Courtesy of Nick Caprinolo 

The photos came to me courtesy of Nick Caprinolo - I'm not a big fan of showing pics of the suspects in these type cases, but in this instance, the suspects have gained a sort of finger pointing at the police, as if we did something wrong in getting them off the streets. So I think it may be appropriate to show these suspects were not mellow, or meek looking individuals, that were being picked on singled out by the Police. They were two brothers that regularly robbed individuals in the area as well as many A&R's at the neighborhood liquor store. When police went to arrest them, they shot a lieutenant first, then later in the same night shot and killed a police sergeant. 

As a result of their actions and the discontent of these brothers by the neighborhood, hundreds of tips came in to police hot lines giving information on the two, sometimes the tips were false, sometimes they were real... But it was out of fear of the Veney Brothers, not the police that brought the tips in.
When I post these stories here, I often follow-up on Facebook where I receive different responses, and those messages tell us a lot too... Here are some of those responses;
The first response was - Many of those bogus tips were on purpose.  The brothers were caught in New York and weren't in Baltimore for most of those tip calls! Those "tips" led to the greatest violation of the 4th Amendment ever, according to one Federal judge.

The next response was - Thanks for posting these.

My response to the first response was as follows - The thing about the "Veney raids" is the officers that were making entry and doing the raids were doing it in good faith, they didn't know the tips were bogus, nor did they know where the brothers were. Something people don't understand about police is that they don't want to do a raid, just to do a raid; no one wants to go into a home disrupting lives of good people knowing the suspect(s) or suspected objects are not in the house. Since 1964 a lot has changed, police equipment has changed, Communications is different, the way information is obtained has changed drastically, back then I was 6 month old, I wasn't sworn in with the BPD yet, so the only thing that is the same for me from then to now is I couldn't walk back then either, LOL... If people only knew the amount of pride officers have in getting the suspect, not one officer wants to waste time chasing bad leads. So yes I agree there were problems with the raids, and today those raids would have been done much differently - But let's not forget, every one of those raids were done in good faith, by police that knew if they were the one that got the house Sam or Earl were in, they may not have made it home, and they still did their job and went in after them. 

Someone that was there at the time write the following about my response - As a Baltimore Police Patrol Officer at that time, I participated in many of those raids. I served in the area where the robbery occurred and worked with both the Lieutenant and Sergeant that were shot. Thank you, Kenny, for your posting and explanation of the circumstances that existed at that time. 

A good friend of mine that worked the district of this shooting wrote - I heard many tall tales about this, thx Kenny
another writes - Kenny, I remember the night well. The entire Western shift volunteered as did most of the other Districts to work many "unpaid" hours. We knocked down lots of doors without warrants, and dragged numerous suspects in, but were unsuccessful in locating them. They were arrested several weeks later in New York by the FBI. (Here again the police were trying to get the Veney brothers - trying to make the area safer, and most important, doing what they were ordered to do. But they did if volunteer (unpaid) in order to try to get these guys, to try to make the arrests that would get two murders off the streets, and make the streets safer. They didn't want to do it, just to kick in doors, just to drag suspects in to the station. If you knew the pain in the rear end it is to transport prisoners or witnesses in to the station, you would know the only reason any one would do at all, much less for free, is because they were trying to help! Times were different than today, and if they had it to do all over they would do it different, but they would still have to remain cautious, and do all they could to make sure they went home alive, and no one was injured or killed)
And finally - I Was attending Edgewood Elementary School at the time.  I remember the fear people had and the relief when they were caught. Parents were afraid to send kids to school.  Very good piece Kenny.

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MICHAEL JOSEPH COWDERY JR
21-E: 22
End of Watch: March 12, 2001
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Baltimore Sun Article Dated 03/13/2001 

A police officer was fatally shot and another wounded last night in East Baltimore when a man opened fire with a powerful handgun, without provocation. Officers Michael Cowdery and Tiffany Walker, working a plainclothes detail, stopped two men about 10:10 p.m. in the 2300 Block of Harford Road for questioning. While they were talking to them, another came around a corner and began firing a .357 caliber Magnum, hitting Cowdery in the head and upper torso. As Cowdery fell, Walker fired her service weapon at the gunman. A third officer, Ronald Beverly, who witnessed the shooting from across the street, also fired at the gunman and followed him about 100 yards east to the 1400 Block of Cliftview Avenue, where they again traded shots. Officer Beverly suffered a graze wound to his leg and then shot the gunman. The gunman, Howard T. Whitworth, as arrested on the scene and taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and was in critical condition. One year later, Howard Whitworth was convicted for the murder and is currently serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

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JOHN J DAILEY
17-E: 3
End of Watch: October 17, 1895
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1895 we lost our brother Police officer John J. Dailey to gunfire based on the following: As the result of arresting three men during a struggle at Charles and Conway Streets, Officer Dailey walked to a local doctor to have first aid applied to what he thought was superficial scrapes. On route he felt blood trickling down his back and really didn’t pay any attention t it as he continued along his way. While at the doctors it was discovered that Officer Dailey had been shot in the small of his back, he was advised to go to the hospital. AT this point he walked back to the station house where a horse wagon took him to University Hospital. There a staff Doctor advised him that his wound was serious and could prove fatal. Officer Dailey felt it was not that serious, he just walked to a doctor, then to the station and then was driven to the Hospital, he insisted on going home. The shooting of officer Dailey occurred on August 26, 1895 and he died of blood poisoning on this day October 17, 1895.

From the Baltimore Sun 1895 – His Dying Statement

This is a story which the patrolmen’s brother and sister told on the witness stand at a Towson court house. The defense tried to have the testimony excluded, but failed.

The dying statement of Patrolman John J. Dailey, of Baltimore, to the effect that Roger Dougherty, Patrick Kane, and John Diviney killed him, was admitted as evidence yesterday at a Towson court house where the trial of the three men was continued.

The statement was repeated by the dead man’s brother. William Dailey, who is a member of the Baltimore Fire Department, and by his Sister Mrs. Baunah Frank

Firemen Daily visited the wounded patrolman twice a day while so latter was at the hospital and three times a day when he was at his home. Wednesday, October 16th the day before the patrolman died, his brother was with him in the morning, when the sick man said he was dying and requested the brother to send for a Doctor…

Statement to Big Brother.

It was testify by firemen daily that he tried to reassure the suffering man but the latter replied, “No Bill the death pain has struck me, I will not live to see Sunday.” Tell me all about the shooting then! Said, William Dailey. “I was on the east side of Charles street”, said the dying man, according to his brothers testimony, “When the three men came down the street, making a disturbance on the opposite side. I crossed over and warned them to stop. Dougherty called me an Irish ________ and I grabbed him to arrest him. - With that Kane grabbed my club and struck me over the head, knocking me down. I was trying to get up from my hands and knees when Diviney kicked me. Kane then yelled to Dougherty get his pistol and give it to him. Dougherty took the pistol out of my pocket and shot me in the back”

Corroborated by Ms. Franck

Mrs. Frank, was called to the stand and repeated the statement almost word for word as it was given by her brother, before Justice Schenkel arrived to take a sworn statement of the dying man. These two witnesses said that the Patrolman became unconscious. The next morning he died without having regaining consciousness.

Trying to exclude testimony.

While the brother and sister were on the stands the crowd in the courtroom was still; the jury leaning forward in their seats to catch every word, and the three prisoners showing more interest in the proceeding than they had before express in their matter. The testimony on the two witnesses had not admitted until nearly an hour had been consumed in an effort by that prisoners and lawyers to have excluded. William Campbell & Duncan read authorities as to the admission in testimony of dying statements, and the asserted that the charge of Patrolman Dailey was not made when he was in fear of death. Another argument was that he was not responsible for this statement because it was made when his mind was clouded by opiates which had been administered to deaden of the excruciating pain which he suffered. The brother’s interest in securing a conviction was also alluded to.

His mind was clear

The foundation of the statement had been carefully laid by the authorities for the eight prosecution, state’s Atty. Of Baltimore County John Kansan and State’s Attorney Duff of Baltimore City. Patrolman Dailey sister and brother were recalled by them to say that his mind was clear, and that on the day the statement was made a dose of opiate mixer had not been given to him until after he had made a declaration as to the guilt of the prisoners and when his pain became so great that he begged for relief.

The Evidence in Admitted

Judge Fowler said in passing on the objection we have not to do with the general rules are with the value of truth or falsity of this statement. The state has shown that Dailey’s mind was clear and that he believed he was about to die. We can do nothing else but admit the testimony. It is for the jury to determine as to its value and it truth.

The Patrolman’s widow

The patrolman’s widow Mrs. Magee Dailey, stated that her husband said on the day before his death, that he was dying. She was overcome by grief and left the room, just as she heard him say, “Dougherty did it.”

She also said her husband was a member of Saint Mary Star of the Sea Church and on the Saturday before his death was visited by the Pasture the church Rev. Weldon, who administered the last rites to him.

Mr. and Mrs. Dailey had been married 30 years and had four children of whom is the eldest is a boy of 10 and others our girls the youngest being 18 months old.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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WALTER D DAVIS

27-E: 13
End of Watch: July 1, 1954
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1952 we lost our brother Police Officer Walter Davis to a Line of Duty Auto Accident based on the following:

On 16 October, 1952 Walter Davis’ dream of becoming a Police Officer came true, he entered the academy passed of the required classes and graduated. Upon graduation he was assigned to the Northeast District, he was an aggressive officer, showed up for work on time, handled his calls, has sector and post integrity. On 1 July, 1952 one year, and nine months after his hire while working car number #431 and in the 4400 block of Harford Road, it was ten minutes after a call had come out that all the lights were out on all the safety pylons between the Harford Road car barn and Cold Spring Lane. Officer Walter Davis was killed when his departmental vehicle crashed into one of those pylons.

He will forever be missed, but never will he be forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.. God Bless and Rest in Peace


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THOMAS J. DILLON (Clerk)
End of Watch: July 12, 1926
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1926, we lost our brother Police Clerk Thomas J. Dillon to gunfire based on the following:

Pistol Battle Due To Lack of Facilities For Insane, Longan’s View.
Vanie Lee, Discharged from Bay View, Killed By Police.
Failure of the State of Maryland to provide adequate quarters and facilities for the care of mentally deficient persons in Baltimore was responsible for the pistol battle in the Northwestern District yesterday, in which nine persons, including a police clerk and four patrolman, were shot, Col. Rufus E. Longan superintendent of the Baltimore City Hospitals, said yesterday… 

In a running pistol fight Mr. Lee, who once was an inmate of an insane ward in Baltimore City Hospitals, was shot to death by police after he had been driven from behind parked automobiles. Thomas Dillon, a Police Clerk at the Northwestern Police Station, who, although unarmed, was one of the first to close in on Mr. Lee, is in critical condition at the Colonial Hospital. Physicians, who performed an operation, said the bullet entered his chest and lodged in the spinal column. Paralyzed from the waist down, he had little chance of recovery.
It was said… Charles D. Gaither, Police Commissioner, commended highly the courage and activity of the police at the scene, and particularly praised the efforts of those who were shot. “The patrolmen did everything possible under the circumstances,” Gaither said. “It especially unfortunate that Mr. Dillon was shot, since he was unprepared for such action. Mr. Dillon volunteered when the call for reserves went out, even though the work called for was not in direct line of duty for him.” 

Others shot are: 

Patrolman Webster Schuman, Northwestern District. Shot in the mouth; condition serious; at the University Hospital.

Patrolman Ignatius Benesch, Northwestern District. Shot in the right hip; skull probably fractured by blow struck by Lee with empty pistol during hand to hand combat; at Colonial Hospital.

Police Chauffeur Leroy E. Lentz, Western District. Shot in the ankle; at University Hospital.

Patrolman Howard L. Collins, Northwestern District. Shot in the right hand; at Colonial Hospital.

William H. Kammerer, druggist, Lafayette and Fremont avenues, shot in the right leg.

Arthur Redding, 34 years old, shot in the neck; condition serious; at Colonial Hospital.

Calvin Howard, 16 years old, shot in the hand; treated at the University Hospital.

Mildred Duncan, 11 years old. Shot in the abdomen; condition serious; at the Colonial Hospital. 

Lee, according to witnesses, first ran amuck in a lunchroom not far from Argyle and Lafayette Avenues, where most of the shooting occurred. After quarreling with Arthur Redding, proprietor, he ran out on the sidewalk. Redding followed and struck Lee, witnesses said. Lee then drew a pistol and shot his assailant in the neck. After this he went home, 635 West Lafayette Avenue, and soon reappeared armed with a rifle and another pistol. Sitting on the steps in front of his home, with the rifle across his knees and his pistols nearby, Lee calmly smoked a cigar, witnesses declared. Meantime, residents had notified Rex Moore, telephone operator at the Northwestern Police Station, that a crazy man had shot another and was terrorizing the neighborhood. The police of the Western district were asked to send the patrol, while Police Clerk Dillon, Patrolman Schuman and Patrolman Collins set out for the scene of the shooting in a Police Department automobile. First on the scene, Patrolman Schuman jumped from the automobile and found cover in the doorway of a grocery store, as bullets from Lee’s weapons struck the glass front of the store. A bullet from Lee’s rifle penetrated two large plate glass windows and wounded Patrolman Schuman in the mouth. The policeman later was rescued by other patrolmen and sent to the hospital. As Police Clerk Dillon ran to Patrolman Schuman’s side he was shot in the chest. Lee was eventually shot and killed by responding patrolmen. Both Police Clerk Dillon and Patrolman Schuman succumbed to their injuries.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless, and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Murphy.


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WILLIAM F DOEHLER
49-E: 8
End of Watch: August 5, 1927
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer William F. Doehler Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Friday, August 5, 1927 Cause: Gunfire

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1927 (5 Aug 27) we lost our brother Police Officer William F. Doehler - Officer Doehler was shot and killed by David Berry on August 5, 1927, after the officer had arrested him at a pawnshop for possession of stolen goods. Officer Doehler took him to a call box at Pennsylvania and Biddle to call for the wagon. While at the box, the assailant pulled a gun and shot the officer through the chest.

Officer Doehler was married and the father of two children. he entered the department on September 3, 1919.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department won’t let him be forgotten, RIP Officer William F. Doehler - "Your service "Honored" the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department"

Search in Capital for Negro Fruitless
17 August 1927

pg 22

SEARCH AND CAPITAL FOR NEGRO FRUITLESS

Detectives Make Two Trips Seeking To Let Slayer Of Patrolman

Capt. Charles H. Burns, of the detective bureau, and four other members of the Police Department made to fruitless trips to Washington yesterday in an attempt to capture David L. Perry, Negro, wanted for the murder of patrolman William F. Doehler August 5

the detectives made their first trip on information furnished by George Diggs, Negro, who said he had spent Sunday night with Perry in Washington and believe the alleged slayer was still in the capital.

After a vain search the police returned to Baltimore and escorted Diggs to Washington to point out the house.

According to detectives, Diggs merely was lying.______________________________

Shout once the policeman as Negro suits

22 Aug 1927

page 22

SHOUT WARNS POLICEMAN AS NEGRO SHOOTS

Lawyer cries “lookout” as prisoner drawls pistol and Fires

Patrolman’s quick action saves him

Forces man to knees, bullet going wild; was calling wagon when attacked

a spectators warning shout yesterday probably save the life of patrolman John coffey, 62-year-old policeman of the northeastern district, one a Negro he had arrested suddenly drew a pistol with his left hand and fired. The patrolman, however, at the in time to force his prisoners partially to the ground and to escape the bullet.

The bullet passed through the transom over the door of a nearby store, penetrated the metal ceiling and lodged in the ceiling of the room above in Mrs. Fanny Barnack, wife of the owner of the store, was dressing.

CITED FOR BRAVERY SEVEN TIMES

Patrolman Coffey has been cited for bravery seven times during the 23 years he has been a member of the police force.

It was the third time this month that patrolman Baltimore have been attacked by prisoners as they were taking them to the station house. On August 6 patrolman William F Doehler of the Northwestern district, was shot fatally by a prisoner after he had taken the man to a call box. On August 13 patrolman Harry P Levinson also the Northwestern district, was forced to shoot a prisoner who had wrestled away his Espantoon and was attempting to beat him.

LAWYER GIVES A WARNING

patrolman Coffey had arrested the Negro, who later identified himself as “Bud” Young – 39 years old, 500 block S. Spring St., and was summoning the patrol when Samuel Greenfield, 1715 East Baltimore St., an attorney shouted “lookout Coffey,” just before the Negro fired. The policeman and prisoner were standing before the barn asked store at 1404 East Baltimore St. at the time

the arrest had been made in the block where young lives. Patrolman Coffey walked his prisoner to Baltimore Street and thence to Elm Street, where he asked to someone in the store to telephone for the patrol. When the person telephoning ask for his name at the request of the operator at the police station. Patrolman Coffey called out “what’s that?” At the time stepping slightly forward. He held the Negro securely by the right arm, however, as they previously had a tussle in Spring Street.

DRAWLS PISTOL, HE SAYS

as a patrolman step forward young drew the pistol with his left hand, Mr. Greenfield asserted.

“I was sitting in a parked car at the corner of Baltimore and Eldon streets and was the only one nearby who could see what was happening, as Coffey and the Negro were partly hidden from view by a number of packing cases,” the attorney said, “something told me that things were going to happen. A few minutes before I had seen Coffey and a young struggling in Spring Street as I was passing in an automobile and so I pulled up and parked.”

“One Coffey step forward to give his name to the man at the phone I saw the Negro draw his pistol, “lookout, Coffey,” I yelled. Coffey turned and twisted the man’s right arm, pushing him down on one knee just as the pistol went off.”

BULLET ENTERED THE STORE

“The twisting motion forced young to fire upward and the bullet missed Coffey.”

“Then I ran forward and put my foot on Young’s left arm so that he couldn’t fire again and Coffey took the pistol away from him.”

Mr. Greenfield explained that he had known patrolman Coffey for a number of years.

At the northeastern police station young was charged with assaulting and shooting with intent to kill. Caring deadly weapons and disorderly conduct.

He will be given a hearing today before magistrate Thomas F. O’Neill

NEGRO, DOEHLER CASE SUSPECT, CAUGHT, FLEES

The Sun (1837-1987); Sep 6, 1927;

pg. 24

Negro – Doehler case suspect, caught, flees

Automobile what’s on way to capital, report

Man answered description of Patrolmam’s Aledged Slayer, Assertion

A Negro believed to be David Perry – sought since August 5 as the slayer of patrolman William F. Doehler, escaped in an automobile with two companions last night after a park motorcycle patrolman had arrested the trio.

The three Negroes, one of whom answer closely to the description of Perry, were placed under arrest by patrolman Robert Brady, on duty on Gwynns Falls Parkway, shortly before 9 o’clock

ORDERED TO STATION

Brady had stopped the car on suspicion. He saw that one of the Negroes resembled Perry, even to a patch which the alleged slayer wears on his left cheek to cover an abscess. Brady ordered the Negroes to turn the car and drive to the police station while he followed on his machine.

As the car and motorcycle, traveled on Windsor Mill Road, were between Clifton Avenue and Wetheredville Road, Brady’s headlight went out and a moment later his machine slid into a ditch.

The Negro drive an automobile sped away suicide Street. Brady fired his revolver several times to attract attention and residents of the section notified the Northwest police station, to which patrolman Doehler what attached.

SEARCH OF DISTRICT MADE

Patrolman Ernest temple, Henry Alexander and Lawrence E. Peters, each driving a light car, were sent to the district and cruised for several hours without finding the fugitive’s. Brady reported that the Negroes had several suitcases in the touneau of the car and told him they were going to Washington.

Neither members of the state police at the Laurel substation nor Washington police had been notified late last night to watch for the car.

Perry, alias Barry, Perran and Kanard, had been sought by the police of Baltimore and other cities since the day patrolman Doehler was shot and killed at a police call box on Pennsylvania Avenue. The policeman had arrested a Negro on a petty larceny charge and was calling the patrol when his prisoner suddenly drew a pistol, shot his capture and escaped.

For more than two days in intensive hunt, in which citizens joined with the police, was carried on in the Negroes districts. The search was extended to Washington, where Perry was reported to have been seen, but the detectives failed in their efforts to find him.

DESCRIPTION OF NEGRO

Perry is described as a light-skinned Negro, 22 years old, 5 feet seven or 8 inches tall and weighing between 140 and 150 pounds. He has a 3 inch scar on the back of his right arm. On his left cheek is an abscess, over which he usually wears an absorbing patch, held in place by strips of adhesive plaster. It is believed that he will seek medical treatment, as the abscess has been malingering for two years.

The Police Department has offered a reward of $250 for the capture of the slayer

SUSPECT IN DOEHLER SLAYING ELUDES POLICE

7 September 1927

page 3

Suspect in Doehler slaying eludes police

All available clue run down without finding Negro fugitive

The police last night said they had run down all the clues available without finding David Perry, Negro, salt as the murder of patrolman William F. Doehler.

A man believed to be Perry, accompanying two other Negroes, escaped from Robert Brady, a Park policeman, after he had arrested them Monday night. The Negroes escaped when Brady’s motorcycle went into a ditch.

NEGRO HELD IN OKLAHOMA MAY BE PERRY

The Sun (1837-1987); Sep 9, 1927;

pg. 26

Negro held in Oklahoma may be Perry

Description said to correspond with alleged slayer of patrolman.

Detective to leave for West at once

accused friend to go along – indictment to be asked today with the arrest in Oklahoma City Oklahoma, of a Negro named Perry, whose photographs were partially identified yesterday by the wife and several friends of David L Perry, alleged slayer of patrolman William F. Doehler, the police here believed that they were closer to the capture of murder than at any other time since the crime was committed August 5.

Lieut. Martin J. Manion, of the detective bureau, accompanied by Negro who knows Perry well, will leave for the West today and an effort to complete the identification, Capt. Charles H. Burns, of the detective bureau, said last night.

To ask for indictment today.

Robert R. O’Connor, states attorney, said last night that he would go before the grand jury today and asked that Perry be indicted on the charge of first-degree murder. The present term of the grand jury were in today.

Mr. Gerald O’Connor said that an indictment would be necessary in case the Negro held in Oklahoma City proved to be Perry, an indictment or a governors warrant being necessary for the extradition.

Photographs arrive here.

Photograph of Negro under arrest in Oklahoma City Oklahoma, together with a description of him, arrived at the detective bureau yesterday. The description corresponds in every respect to that furnished the police by the wife and friends of Perry.

In weight, height and complexion they are about the same, the man held has a sore on the left cheek, similar to the one from which Perry is said to have suffered for several years.

“Looks like him” wife says

One of photograph of their captive sent here by Oklahoma City authorities was shown to Perry’s wife, Lottie, she said, “it looks like him,” the police reported.

William Butler, Negro, a friend and former neighbor of the alleged slayer, and several intimate acquaintances of Perry are said to have made the same statement.

Either Butler or one of the other Negroes will company the detective. The condition of Perry’s wife will not permit her to be taken.

Previous to the communication from the Western city the only picture of Perry in the hands of the police was an enlargement from a snapshot, in which the Negro was depicted wearing a cap with only part of his face showing.

$250 reward offered

This picture has been reproduced on handbills offering a reward of $250 for the capture of the Negro. These handbills had been distributed to all the police departments in the country and it was from the one in their possession that the suspicions of the Oklahoma City authorities were aroused.

They checked the descriptions of Perry with the man they had arrested and wrote the chief inspector George the G. Henry.

The Negro was arrested several days ago on the charge of burglary. He gave his name as Henry James. He refused to talk to the Oklahoma City police, a dispatch from their last night said, detective pointed out yesterday that it was for attempting to pawn a watch believed to have been obtained in a burglary in the northeastern district of Baltimore, that patrolman Doehler had placed the Negro believed to be Perry under arrest.

Tried to pawn watch

Patrolman Doehler had gone to a pawn shop on Pennsylvania Avenue in response to a call from the proprietor, who said that a Negro was attempting to pawn a watch, the number of which had been reported on the lookout sheet.

The patrolman led the Negro to a call box at Biddle Street and Pennsylvania Avenue and called the patrol wagon. Before it arrived, it was said, the prisoner drew a pistol, shot the policeman through the heart and fled.

Patrolman Doehler fired once as he sank to the ground and as he was the best marksmen of the Northwestern district, the police for some time worked on a theory that the policeman’s slayer had been wounded.

On the night following the shooting numerous reports that the Negro had been seen around the city. In the Western district a crowd of 4000 persons join the police in a chase which began at Perry’s house in a 600 block of Sarah Ann Street and spread over that section of the city, lasting several hours. On the same night a room which had been occupied by Perry was searched and a quantity of jewelry, some of which was said to have been stolen in the same robbery as the watch, which patrolman Doehler’s slayer tried to pawn, was found.

Since that time. Has been reported in Washington, Woodwardville, Maryland: Alexandria Virginia and in nearly every part of Baltimore.

Negro suspect escapes

Monday night a Negro answering the description of Perry was placed under arrest on Gwinn’s falls Parkway by officer Robert Brady, a Park policeman. The Negro into companions, also colored, were in an automobile when Brady’s suspicions were aroused. He ordered the driver to go to the police station, planning to follow the car on his motorcycle.

His motorcycle overturned, however, and the Negroes escaped.

SUSPECT DENIES DOEHLER SLAYING

The Sun (1837-1987); Sep 10, 1927;

pg. 9

SUSPECT DENIES DOEHLER SLAYING

Negro held in Oklahoma City says he has never been east of Kansas

LEAVES HERE FOR WEST

detective seeks to identify man thought murder of Baltimore patrolman

Oklahoma City, September 9 – the Negro named Perry, held here for Baltimore police and believed to be David L. Perry, who is accused of shooting a Baltimore patrolman to death August 5, today denied all knowledge of the Baltimore crime and said that he has never been east or north of Kansas

He also said that he is 17 years old and that his mother, two brothers and wife lived in Oklahoma City.

Baltimore Negro was 22

The man wanted by Baltimore authorities is said to be 22 years old and have a wife in the Maryland city. The Perry arrested here has a sore on the right side of his face. The Negro one in Baltimore has an abscess on the left cheek, but in other respects the descriptions tally.

Perry admitted serving jail term in Kansas for minor offenses last year.

Leaves for Oklahoma City

Lieut. Martin J. Mannion, of the detective bureau, accompanied by William Butler, a Negro who knows David L. Perry, left Baltimore late yesterday afternoon for Oklahoma City in an effort to identify the man held there as the Negro salt in the murder of patrolman William F. Doehler. If Butler identifies the Perry held in the West another detective will be sent to Oklahoma with extradition papers to bring the accused back to Baltimore. Lieut. Mannion is expected to arrive in Oklahoma City tomorrow morning.

David L. Perry was indicted yesterday after several detectives and Butler had testified before the grand jury.

Finds Doehler Met Death at Hands of Negro Berry

The Sun (1837-1987); Sep 14, 1927;

pg. 5

Finds Doehler met death at hands of Negro Barry

Coroner gives verdict in killing of patrolman by prisoner

Dr. George C. At large, last night gave a verdict in the fatal shooting of patrolman William F. Doehler. He found that the patrolman met his death at the hands of David L. Barry, Negro, also known as Perry. The investigation was held at the Western police station.

Hillary W. Gans, assistant state’s attorney, questioned a number of witnesses to the murder. The pistol with which Barry is alleged to have shot Doehler was produced. Two taxicab drivers who were witnesses to the shooting told conflicting stories concerning the pistol, one alleging that the weapon produced by the state was the one used by Berry, while the other asserted it was not.

Doehler was killed August 6 following his arrest of a Negro in a pawn shop on Pennsylvania Avenue. The patrolman was taken the Negro to the box when the prisoner shot him. The Negro still is at large.


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CHARLES J DONOHUE
56-W: 14
End of Watch: May 20, 1902
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1902, we lost our brother Patrolman Charles J. Donohue, of the Northwestern police district to Gun fire based on the following:

Patrolman Charles J. Donohue, was shot behind the left ear by Charles Wilson; colored, in the latter's house, at 1332 Whatcoat street, Late Last night, and he now lies in n serious , condition at the Maryland Homeopathic Hospital. The ball pierced his skull. Wilson made his escape after firing the shot, and at an early hour this morning had not been captured. The shooting was done with the patrolman's own revolver. He had been called In by Mary Jones, Wilson's common-law wife, to arrest him, the couple having had trouble about money. As Donohue entered a rear room, so Mary Jones told Sergeant Plum, he was struck over the head by Wilson with a, beer bottle. While dazed he attempted to use his revolver. The negro grabbed It, and, knocking the half conscious officer to the floor, deliberately fired at his head. The ball entered just behind the left ear. The report of the pistol attracted Sergeant Plum, who was In the neighborhood. When he arrived at the house he found Patrolman Donahue bleeding 011 the floor, but his assailant had fled through the rear yard.

Mr. Donohue was sent to the hospital and a general alarm was sent out for Wilson. At an early hour it was said that the patrolman was In a critical condition.

He was appointed August 20, 1901, and Is 27 years old. He resides at 704 North Fremont avenue. His father, Mr. John Donohue. Is a well-known liveryman. Wilson, according to the description sent out this morning, is 35 years old, about 5 feet 6 inches tan, moderately stout, of light color, has small mustache and an upper front tooth is missing. He wore a dark coat and vest and plaid trousers, with light flat soft hat. It Is said the trouble between Wilson and the Jones woman' started over 50 cents - he Is alleged to have gotten from her by claiming a friend had been arrested and that he wanted to help pay the fine. When the woman learned that the story was false she demanded the return of the money. The dispute grew warm and the woman called In the officer.

Patrolman Charles J. Donohue, of the Northwestern Police District, who was shot

In the head late Monday night at 1332 Whatcoat street by a negro said to be John Prewvines, alias Charles Wilson, died last evening, at 8.40 o'clock, at the Maryland Homeopathic Hospital, to which he was removed after the shooting. He did not regain consciousness, and therefore no dying deposition could be taken. No hope of Patrolman Donohue's recovery was entertained at any time at the hospital. It was discontinued because of the great flow of blood from the wound. That doctors at the hospital realized the patrolman's hopeless condition. And all that they attempted to do was to make him as comfortable as possible.   They found that the bullet had lodged at the base of the brain and could not be extracted. Probing for the bullet had to be discontinued because of the great flow of blood from the wound.

Miss Margaret Donohue, a sister of the dead patrolman, spent the whole day at his bedside. His father, Mr. John Donohue and his other brothers and sisters were present when he drew his last breath.
While he is gone, he will not be forgotten, as we his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not allow that. He stood tall, and made us proud to call him our brother. RIP Officer Byrd, and God Bless…


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JAMES T DUNN
25-E: 17
End of Watch: June 20, 1894
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day 20 June 1894, we lost our brother's Policeman Michael Neary and Policeman James T. Dunn of the Central District as they were both instantly killed at 8:25 p.m. They were struck by a locomotive of the Northern Central Railway at the bridge between Chase and Eager Streets. Policeman Neary’s head was severed from his body and the two parts were picked up separately. Policeman Dunn was hit on the right side of the head. His skull was fractured in several places and his body was knocked from the railroad bridge into Jones’s Falls. The two bodies were recovered immediately after the accident by Captain Frank Toner of the Central District and were carried into Calvert Station on a private car furnished by the railway company and from here were taken to the City Hospital. The accident occurred while the policemen were attempting to arrest a number of boys who were bathing in Jones’s Falls. Boys have been accustomed to take off their clothes and get into the waters of the Falls at this point almost daily. Their antics in the water caused many of the people who live in the neighborhood to become indignant. Complaint was made to the police and an effort was being made to break up the practice. About an hour and a half before the accident happened

4 officers today


Police  Officer James T. Dunn

Policeman Dunn had arrested one boy and sent him to the station house. Returning to his beat he saw other boys in the water and set about capturing them. Policeman Neary was off duty at the time and at his home on Guilford Avenue in citizen’s dress. Appreciating the difficulty that Dunn would have in arresting the boys or restraining them if caught, he put on his coat and went to Dunn’s assistance. The two officers crossed to the east side of Chase Street bridge and descended the high bank to the railroad tracks. They walked over the railroad and getting close to the boys called to them to come out of the water. Captain Toner was an interested spectator of the scene and remained to see how the officers would capture the boys. A large crowd had also collected on the street above. Two of the boys voluntarily came out of the water toward the officers and Captain Toner says that when he saw one boy in Dunn’s charge, he left the bridge and went up Guilford Avenue toward Biddle Street. At that time Neary and Dunn were going up the bank on the west side of the railroad bridge. This was the last the captain saw of his men alive. Soon afterward a large crowd of people gathering on Chase Street bridge hastened back to find out what was the trouble. Then he learned of the fatal accident. After getting up the bank the policemen got on the bridge to walk over to the point where they could get out of the railroad yard onto Chase Street.   The train that struck them was the Parkton accommodation, which had left Union Station on its way into Calvert Station.  It is supposed the policemen did not see or hear the train until it was too late for them to get out of the way.   When the men saw the locomotive upon them, they made a desperate run for life. But it was too late. The fatal blow was struck at the north end of the railroad bridge. Policeman Neary was born in Ireland. He came to Baltimore when sixteen years of age. On October 15, 1877 he was appointed a policeman and patrolled the section between Exeter and Forrest Streets and from Gay to Monument Street. He was a member of A Division and was assigned to day duty. Officer Neary leaves a widow and nine children – six boys and three girls ranging from several months old to nineteen years. Policeman Dunn was six feet tall and weighed 220 pounds. He was thirty-four years old and was born at Long Green, Baltimore County. He was appointed a probationary patrolman December 18, 1890 and was promoted to the regular force May 5, 1891. He was married nearly three years ago and had a baby boy six months old. They are gone but will never be forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department. RIP Brothers and God Bless


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RICHARD H DUVALL
8-E: 17
End of Watch: January 11, 1959
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 11 January 1959 we lost our brother Patrolman Richard H. Duvall to accidental gunfire after a high speed auto chase and the recovery of a stolen auto.

This based on the following:

On Saturday, 11 January, 1959 16 year old Ulbis Buiva, of the 1100 block Roland Heights avenue an 11th grade student at Baltimore Polytech Institute, where he is taking the “A” courses. Entered a car dealership off Mt. Royal Ave. and stole a black 1957 Thunderbird, later around the same time he was involved in a hit-and-run accident at Mt. Royal and North Avenue, at which time both the cars were reported as having Pennsylvania tags. Those tags were stolen from a parking lot also not far off Mt Royal Ave. Patrolman Robert B Leutbecker. spotted the vehicle at Park and North avenues. He reported it by telephone and the radio alert was broadcasted to all cars.

At the time there were several persons in the car. After racing around the park roads, the sports car sped from the park using the Gwen Falls Parkway exit. This is where patrolman Howell and Duvall became involved in the chase. Patrolman Howell and Duvall (partners) were in one of about 18+ police cars that were chasing the speeding Thunderbird, when it cornered too hard overcompensating the turn, the youth driving it struck an embankment before bailing out. Howell and Duvall gave chase, each fired their revolvers at the youth as he ran up the alley, they would eventually capture the youth after a short 100 foot, or less, foot chase. At the end of the chase, the officers were confronted with a “terrific struggle” the suspect putting up a fight, it was during that struggle “one of the officer's gun discharged”. Seeing as how both guns were fired numerous times during the chase, and during the struggle, it was unclear at first which officer's gun fired the fatal shot that took Patrolman Duvall’s life. But during the struggle one of the two guns went off and Patrolman Duvall was shot in the left side of his chest, the bullet passed down, cutting his main artery before it would exit through his right hip, killing him in route through his body.

Patrolman Howell broke down at the hospital when he learned of his partner’s death, in fact he was so broken up that he had to be kept there at the hospital under sedation for the night.

Sadly the next day, ballistics would show, the round that took Officer Duvall's life was fired from his partner, Patrolman Melvin E Howell’s .38 cal revolver.

Patrolman Richard H. Duvall Jr, 28, served the Baltimore Police department for more than 6 years, he was married to Charlotte Duvall, and father to two girls two children a two-year-old Suzan and a three-month-old Cheryl.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 11 January 1959 we lost our brother Patrolman Richard H. Duvall to accidental gunfire after a high speed auto chase and the recovery of a stolen auto.

This based on the following:

On Saturday, 11 January, 1959 16 year old Ulbis Buiva, of the 1100 block Roland Heights avenue an 11th grade student at Baltimore Polytech Institute, where he is taking the “A” courses. Entered a car dealership off Mt. Royal Ave. and stole a black 1957 Thunderbird, later around the same time he was involved in a hit-and-run accident at Mt. Royal and North Avenue, at which time both the cars were reported as having Pennsylvania tags. Those tags were stolen from a parking lot also not far off Mt Royal Ave. Patrolman Robert B Leutbecker. spotted the vehicle at at Park and North avenues. He reported it by telephone and the radio alert was broadcasted to all cars.

At the time there were several persons in the car. After racing around the park roads, the sports car sped from the park using the Gwen Falls Parkway exit. This is where patrolman Howell and Duvall became involved in the chase. Patrolman Howell and Duvall (partners) were in one of about 18+ police cars that were chasing the speeding Thunderbird, when it cornered too hard overcompensating the turn, the youth driving it struck an embankment before bailing out. Howell and Duvall gave chase, each fired their revolvers at the youth as he ran up the alley, they would eventually capture the youth after a short 100 foot, or less, foot chase. At the end of the chase, the officers were confronted with a “terrific struggle” he suspect putting up a fight, it was during that struggle “one of the officers guns discharged”. Seeing as how both guns were fired numerous times during the chase, and during the struggle, it was unclear at first which officer's gun fired the fatal shot that took Patrolman Duvall’s life. But during the struggle one of the two guns went off and Patrolman Duvall was shot in the left chest, the bullet passed down, cutting his main artery before it would exit through his right hip.

Patrolman Howell broke down at the hospital when he learned of his partner’s death, in fact he was so broken up that he had to be kept there at the hospital under sedation for the night.

Sadly the next day, ballistics would show, the round that took Officer Duvall's life was fired from his partner, Patrolman Melvin E Howell’s .38 cal revolver.

Patrolman Richard H. Duvall Jr, 28, served the Baltimore Police department for more than 6 years, he was married to Charlotte Duvall, and father to two girls two children a two-year-old Suzan and a three-month-old Cheryl.

The following articles come from the Baltimore Sun 1959

POLICEMAN IS FATALLY WOUNDED IN CLIMAX OF STOLEN CAR, COURT CASE

12 January 1959

Officer Shot by Bullet from His Own or Partners Pistol

A young policeman was fatally wounded yesterday at the climax of a high-speed stolen car chase through the northern part of the city.

Patrolman Richard H. Duvall Jr. 28 was shot in the chest by a bullet from his own pistol was that of his partner, Patrolman Melvin H. Howell – 29 – while they were arrested the driver of a stolen sports car.

The ballistics tests will be conducted to determine which pistol the bullet came from, investigators said

OCCURRED AFTER CHASE

The shooting occurred in the 3800 block of Greenspring Avenue at the end of a five-mile chase late in the afternoon. It began on Greenmount Avenue and raised it’s be the river 75 miles an hour through Druid Hill Park to Northwest Baltimore. Patrolman Howell and Duvall in one of about 18 police cars chasing the speeding Thunderbird, cornered the youth driving it after it struck an embankment opposite the Children’s Hospital school. They each fired their revolvers at the youth as he ran up the alley, and captured him after a 100 foot, Foot Chase.

ONE OF THE GUN’S DISCHARGED

Police officials who were investigating the shooting said that the youth was captured with a “terrific struggle” and that “one of the officers guns discharged” during the fight Inspector Leo T Kelly when asked whether the officers were clubbing the use with their pistol butts replied, “no doubt he did get hit with one of the guns.” Patrolman Duvall, married and the father of two children. Died about a half hour after the shooting at union Memorial hospital.

MAIN ARTERY CUT

He was shot in the left chest, and the bullet passed down, cutting the main artery and going out over the right hip. Patrolman Howell broke down at the hospital when he learned of his partner’s death and was kept there under sedation last night. Patrolman Duvall, who lived at 942 Imperial Court, Lansdowne, was on the force of seven years. Patrolman Howell has been on the force a year and a half longer. Inspector Kelly, who conducted the investigation with inspector Bernard J Schmidt, said for use other than the driver of the stolen car were being held for questioning about the theft at the Northern Police District.

The driver who gave his age at the hospital as 15 but appeared much older, was treated at union Memorial hospital for scalp cuts, which he apparently received while he was being captured. Inspector Kelly said that the Thunderbird was wanted by police for several counts. It had been reported stolen from an automobile dealer Saturday and as caring Pennsylvania tags reported lost or stolen here earlier. The black 1957 Thunderbird was involved in a hit-and-run accident Saturday at Mt. Royal and North Avenue, at which time both the cars description and its Pennsylvania tags were spotted. Late yesterday afternoon a policeman saw it at Park and North avenues. He reported it by telephone and the radio alert was broadcasted to all cars. At the time there were several persons in the car. One Police car saw minutes later at 25th St. and Greenmount Avenue, touching off the chase with proceeded to North Ave., West on Madison Avenue North on the Druid Hill Park. After racing around the park roads, the sports car sped out the Gwen Falls Parkway exit from the park, where patrolman Howell involved when the case.

HITTING 75 MILES AN HOUR

The train of cars raced to the Park Circle and up Park Heights Avenue. According to patrolman Wilbur Baldwin, one of the pursuing officers, the cars were hitting 75 miles an hour and more. They cut off Violet Ave., up Cottage Avenue and across Oswego Avenue. Where the sports car turned South on Greenspring Avenue. As the sports car twisted down the hill outside the Children’s Hospital school, it turned suddenly to the right into an alley. Apparently in an attempt to reverse directions and lose the oncoming group of police cars.

CAR HITS SLOPE

But it hit a slope along the side of the southernmost house in a 3800 block.

Inspector Kelly said the two policemen were the only ones at the spot when patrolman Duvall was shot. Both of their pistols had been fired, he said.

The inspector said the persons reported in the sports car when it was first seen had apparently been dropped before the high-speed chase, although it was possible one of the riders was in the car when it crashed. A total of three shots were fired by the two pistols, inspector Kelly said. It was the inspector who said, “There was a terrific struggle” in arresting the youth. Patrolman Duvall, and his Wife Charlotte, had their two children a two-year-old and a three-month-old.

PARTNERS DEATH MADE TO OFFICER

13 January 1959

Test shows patrolman’s gun killed companion. A Northwest district patrolman was charged yesterday with causing the death of his radio car partner Sunday as the two struggled with the youth at the end of a five-mile high-speed car chase. The technical charge was placed against Patrolman Melvin E Howell, 29 of 1800 block of Swansea road, after the ballistic test showed that a bullet from his gun killed his partner, policeman, Richard H. Duvall. 28, of Lansdowne. A total of three shots had been fired from his gun, and the .38 caliber service revolver of patrolman Officer Melvin E. Howell.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

As police continue their investigation of the car theft, and a wild chase that led to its recovery, there were these other developments

1. The 15-year-old youth who was arrested at the climax of the chase was operated on at Union Memorial Hospital where he was being treated for a skull fracture. Inspector Leo T. Kelly said Sunday he had been hit with the policeman’s revolvers.

2. Car theft charges were placed against another youth 16, who is alleged to have had a part in taking the 1958 Thunderbird from the automobile dealer on Saturday. Hearing of the charge and postponed it to February 9 when a youth, Ulbis Buiva, a native of Latvia, it appeared yesterday before magistrate James F Fanseen, and Northern police court. His counsel, Preston A. Pairo, Junior, said Buiva is an 11th grade student at the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, where he is taking the “A” course. He lives with his parents in the 1100 block Roland Heights avenue. Bail was set at $750 on the car theft charge and a $250 on the second count, alleging that Buiva was involved in stealing a set of Pennsylvania license plates from a car in a parking lot. Pennsylvania tags were on a stolen car which police chased through the Midtown, and Midwest sections of Baltimore.

SPOTTED SUNDAY

The stolen car was spotted Sunday afternoon parked in the 600 block of W. North Ave. by Patrolman Robert B Leutbecker. He said he went over to the shiny black car and asked the useful driver for his operator’s license and registration card. The officers said the youth replied the credentials were in the glove compartment, but that he would get them. He got into the car, which was occupied by three young women and another young man and they roared away.

By the time the car had gone three blocks, police said, the passengers were demanding to be let out. The driver stopped and allowed all four to leave the car.

The four later were questioned by police, who said yesterday that no charges will be brought against them.

CHASE CAR THROUGH PARK

After the stolen car raced away from the officer who wanted to question

As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.


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WARREN V ECKERT
63-E: 17
End of Watch: November 16, 1960
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1960 we lost our Brother Police Officer Warren Eckert

On November 16, 1960 at approximately 12:35 P.m., Officer Warren Eckert was responding to a call for service using his lights and sirens. At the intersection of Pratt and Carey Streets, Officer Eckert was struck by another motorist, throwing him from his motorcycle. He struck his head against the street, causing fatal injuries. Officer Eckert served with the Baltimore Police department for 5 years. Before being appointed to the Baltimore Police Department in 1955, Officer Eckert was a member of our United States Navy where he served from April 19, 1951 until March 22, 1955.

Motorist Faces Jury Action in Fatal Accident
21 Dec 1960 page 36
A motorist who was involved in an accident in which a traffic policeman was killed last month was held for grand jury action yesterday after a hearing in Central District Police Court - Police said the defendant Thomas A Goins, Jr 42, Negro, was driver of pick-up truck which collided with a motorcycle operated by patrolman Warren V. Eckert November 16.

The Officer was dead on arrival at Franklin Square Hospital after the Accident.Police testified Patrolman Eckert was westbound on Pratt Street with his siren operating and red light flashing when his vehicle hit the truck which was Northbound on Carey. And had run the red light entering the intersection in the path of Patrolman Eckert Goins, of 600 Block of Baker Street was charged with manslaughter. He was held on $1000 Bail
As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, his service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department, it honored us all may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

$70,000 Granted Kin Of Policeman
Dec 12, 1962 - pg. 17
Damages totaling $70,000 were awarded in superior court yesterday to the widow and three minor children of Officer Warren V. Eckert a motorcycle patrolman, who was killed in a traffic accident while escorting an emergency ambulance to a hospital in November 1960
The jury under Judge Anselm Sodaro returned a consent judgment of $27,750 for Mrs. Katheryn A. L. Eckert: $19000 for Maureen S Eckert 6, $11500 for Beverly C Eckert 10, and $2250 for Mrs. Eckert as administratrix. Testimony produced by James R White A. Davis Gomborov and Matthew Swerdloff. Council for the plaintiff, disclosed that Patrolman Eckert was leading an Ambulance with his siren on and lights blinking when he was struck by a truck at Carey and Pratt Streets. Thomas A. Groins Jr driver of the truck of the 600 block Baker Street and Baltimore Beverage Distribution Company of Maryland Inc. of the 2600 Block Pennsylvania Ave. ran the light entering the intersection causing the collision
As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, his service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department, it honored us all may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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JAMES E FOWLER III
16-E: 27
End of Watch: September 27, 2010
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
A 33-year Baltimore police veteran was killed Monday evening in a single-vehicle accident in Pennsylvania while traveling to a training program, police said. Officer James E. Fowler III, of Catonsville, was driving through Lewiston Lewistown, Pa. at about 5:25 p.m. when his 2002 Chevrolet truck hit a berm on U.S. 22/322 west and came to rest along a concrete barrier on the left side of the roadway. Fowler joined the Baltimore Police Department in 1976 after he was honorably discharged from the U.S. Navy. The bulk of his career was spent in the patrol division and traffic investigations, Guglielmi said. According to a 1993 Sun Article, he was dispatched to respond to a citizen's call of a frantic woman screaming and helped deliver a baby in the back of a police wagon. Fowler had received medical training in the Navy and served as a volunteer medic with a Carroll County fire department. Thomas Portz, Jr., a 1996 Sachem graduate, and a Baltimore City Police Officer, went into cardiac arrest and died shortly after, according to Baltimore City officials. He was 32. A police spokesman told WBALTV the crash occurred shortly before 10 a.m. He said a fire truck was responding to a medical incident in west Baltimore when the police cruiser rear-ended it while it was at a standstill. "What caused the collision, we don't know at this point," fire department spokesman Kevin Cartwright told the television station. It is not clear yet whether Portz was responding to a call or had his lights and sirens activated. Portz leaves behind a wife and three children. "I ask the citizens of Baltimore to keep his family and friends in their thoughts and prayers," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in a statement. "The people of Baltimore owe Officer Portz their gratitude for dedicating his life to public safety. He was well loved by not only his wife, but by the officer he worked with. They are all taking this very hard." Portz, a 9-year veteran of the force, who grew up in Holtsville, is a product of Tamarac Elementary School, Seneca Middle School and Sachem North. Louis Gregory, a lifelong friend, recalls playing Wiffleball, hockey and football with him like it was yesterday. "We played more times than I can remember," said Gregory, who was saddened to learn about Portz's passing. "I will miss Tommy, his smile and slap shot." He is the third Baltimore police officer killed in less than a month. 

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CHARLES S FRANK
24-E: 14
End of Watch: June 20, 1924
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer Charles S. Frank Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Friday, June 20, 1924 Cause - On this day in Baltimore police history 1924 we lost our brother patrolman Charles L Frank of the southern district to gunfire based on the following:

From Baltimore Sun paper reports dated 21 June 1924

Patrolman Shot Aiding Woman, Dies

Victim Accuses Harry C Jones of Inflicting Fatal Wound

Wife to Give Statement

Husband Held without Bail for Hearing on Murder Charge

Patrolman Charles L Frank southern district, shot early yesterday (20 June 1924) when he entered the dwelling at night 1619 Marshall St. to arrest Harry C Jones died of his injuries at 9 o’clock last night.

In a disposition at the South Baltimore General Hospital five hours before he died he accused Jones of firing the fatal shot

He entered the Jones home he declared at the invitation of Mrs. Jones, who would become involved in a car with her husband.

Wife Gives Statement

A written statement of the circumstances surrounding the shooting was obtained from Mrs. Jones by representative of the office of Herbert O’Connor states attorney.

The tragedy closely perils the fatal shooting of patrolman Frank laughed him February 29 last by Leon Schmidt in the latter’s home at 511 South Collington Ave. Schmidt was serving a sentence of life imprisonment for the crime.

Tales of Deposition

Magistrate Joseph O’Donnell, southern district, who took the dying patrolman’s deposition, said it is substantially as follows:

Patrolman Frank said he walked past the Jones home at 1 AM here Jones is what quarreling believing that nothing serious was amiss, he did not stop. An hour later he again approached the house. The quarrel had become violent. He entered the yard. Ms. Jones appeared at the rear door and asked him to come inside.

Shot in the Stomach

He entered hoping to be able to pacify the man and his wife. As he stepped across the threshold Jones reach for a pistol which is covered by hat on the table. He fired twice. The first bullet missed its mark. The second entered Frank stomach.

Frank staggered outside and fired his pistol several times to summons assistance. He then swooped and remember nothing more until he regained consciousness in the hospital 15 hours later.

Patrolman author McCloskey reported that he heard the shots and hastened to the scene. He summoned the police ambulance at Frank taken to the hospital. He then entered the house and arrested Jones.

Jones is Held

In operation was performed on Frank and throughout the day physicians said he had an even chance for life. He regained consciousness at 5 PM and made the deposition. From that time he remain conscious until 8 PM the stepfather John T Kennedy and patrolman Albert C Mont were at his bedside when he died.

Arraigned in the southern police court in the afternoon, Jones had committed to jail without bail for hearing July 20 on a charge of suiting the patrolman. The date was fixed because it was believed Frank would have recovered sufficiently to testify at that time.

In Service Six Months.

His death means that inquest will be held within a few days by Dr. Otto Reinhardt southern districts coroner and the charge against Jones will be changed to shooting and causing the death of patrolman.

Frank was 33 years old he had been a member the Police Department only six months. During the war he served in the Army but was not sent overseas. He lived at 53 South Carrollton Ave. with his mother Mrs. Annie Kennedy his stepfather and a brother George Frank

Baltimore Sun 22 June 1924

Headline

Tells of Quarrel Prior To Shooting

Harry C Jones Says Trouble with Wife over another Woman

Mate Repudiates Story

Denies account of brawl proceeding killing a patrolman called to aid her

Harry C Jones held as the slayer of patrolman Charles L Frank told police yesterday that he quarreled with his wife over another woman before she summoned the policeman.

According to Jones a story, which was told to Capt. John E Cooney. Southern district, he called Thursday night at the home of a woman whom he knew immediately before his marriage to his present wife four years ago. Mrs. Jones call for him and waited outside the house, standing on the pavement for about a half hour. Jones said. When he finally joined his wife, a quarrel started which grew into violence, it culminated, according to Jones a story, in her summoning patrolman Frank. The Jones home is at 1619 Marshall St.

Wife Repudiates Jones’ story

According to the deposition of Frank, taken just before he died Friday night, he entered the Jones home at the invitation of Mrs. Jones and was shot by Jones who used the pistol which had been hidden under a hat on the table 2 shots were fired, according to the deposition, the first going wild in the second striking the patrolman.

Mrs. Jones yesterday repudiates her husband’s story of the origin of the quarrel. Into he said, she contended that the other woman. Advanced by Jones is an unfounded attempt of his, to prove that she was prompted by jealousy when she called police assistance. According to her story, Joan stop the house to get a bunch of keys, one of which fitted his bar room. She waited outside until he came out. She said. The quarrel which followed was over another matter, she declared

Name of woman guarded.

Beside Capt. Cooney the southern district police Roland K Adams deputy states attorney and Herman M Mosier assistant state attorney are investigating the case. Neither attorney would divulge the name or address of “the other woman” mentioned by Jones. Capt. Cooney said he did not know the name or address.

Dr. Otto M Reinhardt: coroner of the southern district will hold an inquest into the death of patrolman Frank at 8:30 PM tomorrow

Baltimore Sun report 24 June 1924

Headline

Jones Found Guilty by Coroner’s Jury

Man Accused of Shooting Patrolman Held for Grand Jury

Harry C Jones fired the shot that killed patrolman Charles L Frank a coroner’s jury decided last night and it inquest at the southern police station.

Patrolman Frank was shot Friday night when Mrs. Mary Jones called him to and 1619 Marshall St. to arrest her husband. Jones declined to discuss the shooting when questioned by Dr. Otto Reinhardt, coroner. He was held without bail for the grand jury.

Mrs. Jones testified that she and her husband had quarreled a over possession of a key to his place of business, one light Street. Patrolman Frank were Jones to stop the noise and what he failed to comply the patrolman stepped into the house to arrest him she said.

As he walked across the room, Jones declared, “You are not going to take me,” and fired at the patrolman. Mrs. Franks declared.

Patrolman author McCloskey and click men Ehrlich testified they arrested Jones near the home

From Baltimore Sun reports in July 13, 1924

Headline

Case of Harry C Jones Is Set For Tomorrow

Man Accused of Killing Patrolman C. L. Frank to Be Tried By Court

The case of Harry C Jones held on the charge of murdering patrolman Charles L Frank of the southern district is assigned for trial tomorrow in the criminal court. On June 20 the patrolman was shot and killed. Jones was indicted June 24 the same day he pled not guilty.

J Abner sailor attorney for the defendant waived the jury trial and the case was assigned for hearing before Chief Judge James girder, whose weeks turns as presiding judge for all the courts during the summer recess begins tomorrow. Rolling Kay Adams deputy state attorney and Herman Moser assistant state’s attorney will be in charge of prosecution.

Patrolman Frank was shot as he entered the dwelling at 1619 Marshall St. to arrest Jones. It is dying deposition the patrolman said he entered the dwelling at the request of Mrs. Jones who would become involved in a quarrel with her husband and a Jones shot him.

He will not be forgotten by us, his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department. God Bless him, and may he rest in peace


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KEVON MALIK GAVIN SR
14-W: 22
End of Watch: April 21, 2000
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. On the night of April 21, 2000, Officer Kevon M. Gavin Sr. answered the call to assist an undercover unit that was pursuing a wanted felon who had just opened fire on a crowd of citizens on a corner, then sped off. Undercover units were doing narcotics surveillance when Eric Stennet drove up in his Ford Bronco and unleashed a hail of bullets on the citizens at that location. Mr. Stennet’s primary motivation was to take over a drug corner that he believed to be his. The undercover officers began to pursue the Ford Bronco as Mr. Stennet sped off. Officer Kevon Gavin Sr. parked his car on the street to safeguard citizens that were in the path of the ongoing pursuit. Officer Gavin left plenty of room for the speeding Bronco to drive around. Mr. Stennet steered his large truck directly into the front end of Officer Gavin’s patrol car, coming to rest on top of Officer Gavin’s car. Officer Gavin was transported to the Shock Trauma Unit at the University of Maryland Hospital, where he succumbed to his wounds. Officer Gavin was married with three children, ages 1, 5, and 8.

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LORENZO ARNEST GRAY
13-W: 11
End of Watch: July 26, 1972
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1972, we lost our Brother Patrolman Lorenzo Gray to gunfire based on the following:

On Tuesday, July 25, 1972, at approximately 10:30 p.m., Officer Lorenzo Gray and Officer William Heath, of the Southeastern District, received a call for a hold up in progress in the 3600 Block of Pulaski Highway. As they were responding to the scene at the Holiday Inn, they encountered two suspects, one of which was armed with a sawed off shotgun. Officer Gray pursued the suspect on foot, while Officer Heath attempted to apprehend the second suspect. After a brief chase, the first suspect wheeled around a fired his shotgun directly into Officer Gray, who then managed to fire one shot from his service revolver, slightly wounding the suspect. Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, who had been near the scene at the time of the shooting, apprehended the suspects. Officer Lorenzo Gray, a three veteran of the Department, was pronounced dead of the gunshot wound at Johns Hopkins Hospital several hours after the shooting. Officer Gray was 24 years old and the father of 2 young children.

The following are news articles from that time


Wounded officer dies after foiling holdup; 2 caught
The Sun (1837-1987); Jul 26, 1972
Wounded officer dies after foiling holdup; 2 caught

A 24-year old Southeastern district patrolman was fatally shot last night as he and another officer were struggling with two armed men at the Holiday Inn, in the 3600 block Pulaski highway.

Patrolman Lorenzo Gray was shot in the chest with a sawed-off shotgun as he was chasing a masked man through the motel's kitchen at 10:40 P.M., police said.

He died in the Johns Hopkins Hospital about 1A.M. today (26 July, 1972).

Patrolman Gray, who had been on the force for three years was the first city police officer to die on duty this year.

Last year, a city patrolman was shot in the head when he was making a telephone call at a police call box.

The shotgun-carrying man and his accomplice, who was armed with a revolver and also masked, were arrested in a scuffle at the Holiday Inn by Patrolman William Heath and other officers, who rushed to the scene after the shooting. Police gave the following account or the events that led to last night’s tragedy:

The two Southeastern district patrolmen were driving in separate cars on Pulaski highway, looking for suspects in an earlier holdup in the area, when they were flagged down by a person who told them that he had seen two masked men enter the motel.

After entering the inn, the officers found the gunmen in the dining room, where Patrolman Heath struggled with a man armed with a revolver and managed to subdue him, police said.

Patrolman Gray, meanwhile chased the man with the shotgun to the motel kitchen. Where the men suddenly turned around and shot at him. Hitting him in the stomach. The blast knocked him 20 feet backward police said.

The patrolman was admitted in critical condition to Johns Hopkins hospital.

The two suspects and four other policeman were injured during the struggle that preceded the pairs arrest officials said.

The gunmen were taken city hospital is reported while the policeman were treated at Mercy Hospital. The extent of their injuries was not available last night.


400 officers attend funeral for slain city patrolman

The Sun (1837-1987); Jul 30, 1972;

400 officers attend funeral for slain city patrolman

Full dress police funeral services were held yesterday for Patrolman Lorenzo Gray, the Southeast district police man who was shot Tuesday while stopping an attempted robbery at an East Baltimore motel. Patrolman Gray. a Vietnam Veteran who joined the city police after his discharge from the Marine Corps in 1968. Was eulogized by the Rev. Leslie G. Metcalf, pastor of the Matthews United Methodist Church, as a man of "devotion to duty," whose death in the line of duty was the single greatest tribute to his dedication. Mr. Metcalf, long active in police affairs, remembered meeting Patrolman Gray after his assignment to the Southeastern district

“I was introduced to a young man with a pleasant smile and a desire to do the job right. I met him again on his beat on monument Street just before he was killed. He wore that same smile that day and his determination to serve the community was even greater.”

More than 400

I still love is now scheduled funny looking doesn’t younger stop loving you okay yeah it’s funny looking at beautiful you look like a monkey is a monkey your nice to keep you More than 400 policeman were present for the 11:15 AM services at the Morton and diet funeral establishment, including some 350 from the Baltimore area. Only 45 of these were assigned to attend, according to the police spokesman.

Among the 21 police who came from out of state representatives of units informed Plainfield New Jersey Washington Newcastle Delaware Philadelphia and Cherry Hill New Jersey one Plainfield policeman, Robert caravan, said that he came because he has a brother on the Baltimore police force and he want to show his solidarity with fellow policeman.

“Everybody else might be against us, but were all together,” he said. Your stand much more than I can understand

Other units

Also present were police from Maryland units in Montgomery County, Anne Arundel County, seat Pleasant Township, Howard County in Baltimore County. Federal law enforcement agencies attending the services included the United States Secret Service. US Park police and the Federal Bureau of narcotics. The Baltimore fire department was also represented.

Gov. Mandel and police Commissioner Donald D Pomerleau were among those who five past patrolman Gray’s casket. Gov. Mandel called the killing “a tragedy” and said that more cooperation between police and citizens might help avert such incidents in the future. “People should let the police know if they see someone carrying a dangerous weapon,” said Mr. Mandel.

Patrolman Gray was killed with assault off shotgun.

About 150 people, including 50 friends and relatives attended the half hour service, while some 300 more waited outside.

Flag draped casket

Patrolman Gray’s flag draped casket was taken two blocks to a hearse by pallbearers through a double column of policeman who stood at attention and saluted. The six pallbearers were members of the original narcotics squad with Patrolman Gray worked with when he joined the Police Department in 1969.

A motorcade of about 200 vehicles, many of them police cars, left the funeral establishment at noon for Harmony Memorial Park, a cemetery in Prince George’s County near Washington. There, on the hill above the gravesite, a fellow policeman a former Marine, Robert L. Domney, played taps in the flag that had draped patrolman Grace Casket was presented to his stepfather Milton Cross.

In addition to his stepfather, survivors include three stepsisters, Mrs. Benita Jones, Daphne Green and Delphine Green to stepbrothers, Joseph Green and Nathaniel Green two daughters Audrey Gray and Sandra Gray all living in Baltimore.
He will forever be missed, but never forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.. God Bless and Rest in Peace.

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MARTIN JOSEPH GREINER

20-W: 2
End of Watch: December 10, 1974
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. About 2 a.m., on Saturday, November 30, 1974, Officer Martin J. Greiner, assigned to 512 post, received a call to the intersection of Huntingdon Ave and 27th Street for a report of a man discharging a firearm. Officer Greiner was just a block away from the location and informed the dispatcher that he was on-scene. Officer Greiner exited his patrol car and was immediately approached by two men and two women. Without provocation, a volley of shots was unleashed at Officer Greiner striking him and dropping him to the ground. Officer Greiner was able to radio for assistance and gave a description of his assailants. A Signal 13 was called and officers from Northern, Central and Northeastern Districts responded. The suspect was spotted running across the 2600 block of Mace Avenue. After a few moments, the suspected gunman was cornered in front of a residence in the 2600 block of North Charles Street. The suspect immediately began resisting attempts by the officers to place him under arrest. While the suspect was being arrested, Officer Greiner was transported to Union Memorial Hospital for treatment of two gunshot wounds. Although critically wounded, he was conscious when officers brought in the suspect for positive identification. As medical personnel prepared Officer Greiner for his X-Rays, he was able to confirm the identification. At this point the suspect lunged at the wounded officer and had to be restrained from resuming the attack on Officer Greiner. Once outside of the Union Memorial Emergency Room, the suspect began forcefully resisting the escorting officers. Several policemen were struck and kicked. A cruising patrol delivered the suspect to Mercy Hospital for treatment of abrasions. After complaints from the suspect that he had sustained additional injuries internally, he was admitted for observation. At 4:00 p.m., Officers John Burns and John Provenza, Jr. of the Northern District were assigned to guard the suspect at Mercy Hospital. Shortly before 6:00 p.m. the suspect told the officers that he needed to go to the bathroom and asked them to leave the room, which they refused. At this point the suspect was sitting on the edge of the bed and was having trouble maintaining his balance. Officer Burns approached him to steady him. The suspect grabbed Officer Burns’ service revolver and shot Officer Burns twice in the stomach. Officer Provenza returned fire, striking the suspect in the abdomen. Both the suspect and the officer required surgery for the gunshot wounds. As a result of his wounds, Officer Greiner dropped into a coma and died on 12/10/1974 at 10:07 a.m.


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FRANK WILLIAM GRUNDER JF
23-E: 4
End of Watch: August 1, 1974
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Detective Sergeant Frank W. Grunder, Jr., who headed the Department’s Escape and Apprehension Unit, had spent several weeks attempting to track down elusive members of an elusive hold up team. On August 1, 1974, after a day of patrolling locations in the city in an attempt to find the holdup suspects, with no results, Sergeant Grunder went home after work. While off duty, Sergeant Grunder was driving on Harford Road in Hamilton with his wife and three children in the back seat. As he approached Echodale Avenue, he saw a man sitting crouched on the steps leading to the play lot at St. Dominic’s Roman Catholic Church. Weeks of waiting and watching had finally paid off, this was one of the suspects. He parked his car a safe distance from the church, called for a uniformed back up unit and waited. Officer Joe L. Shaw of the Northeastern District wasn’t the assigned back up unit, but readily stopped when Sergeant Grunder waved him down. The 12-year veteran explained the situation to the uniformed officer as they approached the suspect who was still sitting on the steps. Sergeant Grunder was a few feet ahead of Officer Shaw as he ordered the suspect to stand and place his hands on the wall. At this point the suspect lurched to his feet and began running up the steps. As Sergeant Grunder reached the top step the suspect wheeled and began firing point blank. The Sergeant was able to fire three shots in return as he fell to the sidewalk, mortally wounded. Officer Shaw also returned fire. The suspect dropped. Detective Sergeant was transported to Union Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead upon arrival. The assailant, a resident of the area, was pronounced dead on the scene. Investigation into the suspect’s past revealed a string of felony arrests dating back to 1960. Funeral services were held for the 34 year old Sergeant on August 5th at St. Dominic’s Catholic Church.


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JIMMY DALE HALCOMB
34-E: 8
End of Watch: April 16, 1976
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Shots rang out from a high-powered rifle in Western Baltimore on Good Friday. Bullets poured onto the street from 1303 West Lombard Street. Several districts, including the Southern, Southwestern, Western and Tactical sections responded. Officer Jimmy D. Halcomb was 31 years old. He was assigned to the Operations Unit of the Western District and was one of the first to arrive on scene. The sniper fired a round, which penetrated the automobile Officer Halcomb was using for cover, striking the officer. He lost consciousness immediately. Seconds later, he was dead. Twenty five year old Officer James A. Brennan of the Western District was crouching behind a van a few feet south on Carey Street. He went down severely wounded. Officer Roland W. Miller, 23 of the Western District, sustained a minor wound in his left arm. Officer Neal C. Splain, 28, Officer Calvin R. Mencken, 33, and Officer Arthur E. Kennell, Jr. 27, all of the Southern District were hit by a shotgun blast that came from the rear of the building. A civilian was also wounded. It took nearly 45 minutes for the situation to be resolved. The suspect, an 18 year old male, surrendered to officers after telephoning his intentions to the Communications Division of the Department.
 
On this day In Baltimore Police History 1976 we lost our brother Police Officer Jimmy Halcomb.  on Good Friday in West Baltimore shots rang out from a high-powered rifle as a teenage POS sniper who was using armor piercing ammunition near the intersection of Lombard and Carey Streets fired rounds out onto the street from inside a 3rd floor apartment of 1303 West Lombard Street. Several districts, including the Southern, Southwest, Western and Tactical sections responded. Officer Halcomb was just 31 years old, he assigned to the Operations Unit of the Western District and was one of the first to arrive on scene. The sniper fired a round, which penetrated the automobile Officer Halcomb was using for cover, striking the officer he lost consciousness immediately unfortunately never coming to from his injuries. Before he would call 911 begging to turn himself in the POS suspect would shoot more police and more civilians, among them were Twenty five year old Officer James A. Brennan of the Western District was crouching behind a van a few feet south on Carey Street. He went down severely wounded. Officer Roland W. Miller, 23 of the Western District, sustained a minor wound in his left arm. Officer Neal C. Splain, 28, Officer Calvin R. Mencken, 33, and Officer Arthur E. Kennell, Jr. 27, all of the Southern District were hit by a shotgun blast that came from the rear of the building. A civilian was also wounded. It took nearly 45 minutes for the situation to be resolved. The suspect, an 18 year old male, surrendered to officers after telephoning his intentions to the Communications Division of the Department. Officer Halcomb had served with the Baltimore Police Department for 8 years at the time of his death. He is survived by his expectant wife and two daughters. The suspect was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life plus 60 years July 1, 1977. It has been 37 years since this nightmare began taking our brother Jimmy Halcomb, and while he is gone he will never be forgotten by us, his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department. RIP and God bless Jimmy, you are missed

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CARROLL HANLEY
29-E: 4
End of Watch: October 29, 1936
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1936 we lost our Police Officer Carroll Hanley in and auto accident based on the following: Officer Hanley placed a well-dressed man under arrest at the Back of a Chevrolet, 10 E. North Avenue, when the suspect hoped in his car and sped away. Officer Hanley jumped onto the closed side running board of the vehicle as the car was driving sped through rush hour traffic trying to shake him. Officer Hanley held on for a little more than three blocks but was eventually flung from the car to his death when the driver made a sharp left turn from 20th Street to Hargrove alley.

Newspapers made the following reports:

On 31 October 1936 - The search for Officer Hanley’s Killer widened. Authorities of Pennsylvania, Delaware and D. C. asked to help Baltimore Police. Still lacking any definite clue to the slayer in this case, police extend their search to neighboring States; their search for the driver of the automobile from which Patrolman Carroll F. Hanley was thrown to his death, are accepting the offered help of these neighboring agencies.

The casting of a wider net in 1936 pays off, as police in Washington DC nab a suspect based on the following:

On 2 Nov 1936 - The Baltimore Sun reported - A 35-year-old advertising agent was arrested in a Washington rooming house yesterday (1 Nov) and held for being the suspected driver of the automobile from which Police Officer Carroll F. Hanley was thrown to his death on 20th Street at Hargrove Alley on Thursday morning. After a brief interview the salesman/suspect admitted to driving the car that caused officer Hanley’s death, he went on to tell investigators he was in the rooming house since that Thursday night and that if he could take it all back he would...

On 3 Nov 1936 - The Baltimore Sun reported - HANLEY DEATH SUSPECT IS HELD TILL JURY ACTS

They went on to report, “Body To Hear Allegations Against George Shea Tomorrow” ONE OF WITNESSES IDENTIFIES THE ACCUSED - Police Make No Charges, Ad Solicitor Is Denied Bail, George K. Shea, 35-year-old advertising solicitor, was held without bail in the Central Police Station last night awaiting the action of the grand jury, which tomorrow will hear allegations that he drove the automobile from which Patrolman Carroll F. Hanley was thrown to his death on Thursday then drove straight to the DC Rooming house after killing Officer Hanley.

On 4 Nov 1936 - The Sun reported - SHEA IS HELD FOR OFFICER HANLEY DEATH. The Coroner Found Patrolman Was "Deliberately Thrown From Auto" George Shea made several quick turns from side to said, in order to shake him, or throw him from the vehicle, so that he could make his escape. Police will await Grand Jury Action. On advice of his counsel, George Shea refuses to testify at his inquest. Coroner Hubert last night reached a verdict that the death of Patrolman Carroll last Thursday was due to being literately and intentionally being thrown from the running board of Shea’s moving automobile as it was being driven by Mr. George K. Shea this was the testimony given to the grand jury by, Baltimore Coroner Mr. Hubert.

On 1 Dec 1936 - The Baltimore Sun reports the following - SHEA STARTS MANSLAUGHTER TERM of 5 YEARS FOR THE DEATH of OFFICER HANLEY - Sentenced to The Penitentiary in Maryland for the Death of Police Officer Carroll Hanley defendant Shea Faints upon hearing his penalty in the courtroom - Shea cried out, ”He Would "Do Anything" To Bring Victim Back

George K. Shea”. Last night he began serving a five-year term in the Maryland Penitentiary after he being found guilty of manslaughter in the death of Patrolman Carroll Hanley.

November 2nd 1936 Funeral Services were held for Officer Hanley in attendance were all of his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department, along with his wife Katherine and his 5 children, Robert, Angela, Thomas M, Carroll M & Albert E. Hanley. Behind the Baltimore Police Family, and the Handley Family, we members of the community that Officer Carroll Hanley served for 21 years. Had he not been killed on Oct 29th he would have been awarded several awards at the yearly award ceremony for his actions that year, instead he was Posthumously Awarded the Medal of Honor.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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GEORGE D HART
19-E: 1
End of Watch: January 2, 1925
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 2 Jan 1925 we lost our brother Police Officer George D Hart to a motor vehicle accident based on the following:

Patrolman George D Hart of the Northern District was struck by automobile and injured seriously while on his motorcycle and crossing Charles Street at University Parkway. He was taken to Union Memorial Hospital where he was to be treated for a fractured skull, broken leg, and numerous internal injuries. His chances for survival were not good. The driver of the striking vehicle was Harry W. Rogers Jr., he was arrested at the scene and charged with, failing to give the right away to a Pedestrian, and with assaulting the Patrolman. But was released pending the outcome of Officer Hart’s hospital stay, (in other words, they were already thinking about possible Manslaughter charges and didn’t want to risk a future verdict by over or under charging). The suspect, Rogers said, “A streetcar prevented him from seeing Officer Hart, until it was too late, and he was up on him.” - On 2 January 1925 Patrolman Hart died from the injuries he received in the 16 November accident.

Officer George D. Hart was with the Baltimore Police Department for 6 months and was the first officer to die in the line of duty as the result of a motorcycle accident.

The following are newspaper reports, or excerpts from 1924/1925

PATROLMAN RUN DOWN - 17 November 1924

Patrolman is Hurt Seriously when Struck by Machine

Patrolman George D Hart, northern district, was struck by an automobile and injured seriously while crossing Charles Street at University Parkway. He was taken to union Memorial hospital, where it was said he had received a broken leg and internal injuries.

Harry W Rogers Jr, was arrested he was charged with failing to give the right away to a pedestrian and with assaulting the patrolman. He said the streetcar prevented him from seeing heart until he was upon him

PATROLMAN DIES OF INJURIES - 2 January 1925

GEORGE D HART PATROLMAN DIES OF INJURIES

George D Hart hurt November 16, 1925 in traffic accident

Patrolman George D Hart of the northern district died early this morning at union Memorial hospital for injuries received at November 16 when his motorcycle and an automobile collided at University Parkway and Charles Street. Henry Rogers, Jr. driver of the car was arrested at the time and the later released pending the outcome of heart injuries. Hart received a fractured skull and internal injuries. Rogers lives in the Carolina apartments

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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GEORGE F HEIM
64-E: 12
End of Watch: January 16, 1970
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. On Friday, January 16, 1970, George F. Heim was killed in a tragic car accident in the 5600 block of O’Donnell Street. Officer Heim was directing traffic around a disabled truck on O’Donnell Street during a heavy snowstorm. A car, whose driver did not see him due to the heavy snow and salt deposits on the car’s windshield, struck him. The driver of the vehicle of the car that struck Officer Heim was officially charged. Officer Heim was 42 years old and had a wife and two children.

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CHARLES M HILBERT

39-E: 12
End of Watch: August 4, 1950
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1950 we lost our brother Police Officer Charles M. Hilbert. As on Friday, 4 August 1950, Officer Hilberta recent appointee to the police force was killed in the line of duty when he was struck by an automobile as he was directing traffic at the corner of Potee Street and Patapsco Avenue. The striking vehicle was being operated by a drunk driver that was heading in the wrong direction/ignoring the officer’s instruction. The impact threw Officer Hilbert into the air and up against a street pole causing need for him to be transported to South Baltimore General Hospital where he was pronounced dead from his injuries. Officer Hilbert was a US Army veteran of WWII. He had served with the Baltimore Police Department for 2 months and was survived by his wife.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department won’t let him be forgotten, RIP Officer Charles M. Hilbert - "Your service "Honored" the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department"


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MAX HIRSH

37-E: 17
End of Watch: February 14, 1935
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1935 we lost our brother Police Officer Max Hirsch to an on the job injury based on the following:

Patrolman Max Hirsch of the Southern District was still unconscious at South Baltimore General Hospital on 14 Feb 1935, more than 16 hours after he had been injured in a fall at a garage in the rear 614 Light St. during a commercial burglary investigation.  While patrolling his post, Officer Hirsh received information of a burglary in progress, upon arrival to the location he found an open door. During a meticulous search of the property he made his way up to the second floor and continued his search. This part of the building was cluttered unstable and unsafe; as he searched he came upon a suspect in hiding. This part of the events become blurred, some say the suspect may have struggled with Officer Hirsch pushing him, which caused the fall; other says the man startled Officer Hirsch as he jumped up and ran, Officer Hirsch gave chase apparently forgetting where he was, and then fell through already weakened floor. In either case the suspect was never seen, or heard from again, he was never captured.

Because the witness that gave Officer Hirsch the info on-view he or she was anonymous too, for all we know it could have been a set-up, we will never know. There were no leads to follow, no clues, nowhere for the detectives to go for leads. The case was cold before it began.

Physicians said he had a “Probable Fractured Skull” as he staggered into a Fire House located at, Light and Montgomery Streets, it was 6 AM, his hat was missing, he asked for help as he said, “I fell” - Authorities at the time were able to learn that from him that he climbed to the second floor of the Garage as part of an On-view in-progress burglary investigation he stumbled upon while working his post. He was able to ex-plain that he fell through the concrete of the second floor to the first floor below before making his way to the Fire House for medical attention, and before being taken to South Baltimore General where he would later succumb to his injuries. He wasn't clear in describing his confrontation with the suspect before slipping into what would become more than 16 hours of unconsciousness. He would eventually succumb to his injuries.

At 2 PM the following Sunday a Funeral service was held at his home 3354 Park Heights Ave. for our Brother, Patrolman Hirsh.  Rabbi Israel Tabak, of the Shaael Zion congregation, officiated the burial which was held in the Harry Run Cemetery. The police guard of his fellow officers from the Southern District were in attendance.

As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

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ROBERT MAYNARD HURLEY
46-W: 29
End of Watch: March 28, 1973
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On this day in Baltimore Police History 1973 we lost our brother Officer Robert M. Hurley to a Heart Attack - Officer Hurley was involved in a car chase one day earlier on 28 March 1973, more than a simple chase, this went on for a little longer than normal, it went on through more than one district, resulted in a bailout, a foot chase, and a struggle before the suspect would be taken into custody, afterward Officer Hurley told others that after the chase, the accident and the struggle he didn’t feel right, he felt excited, anxious and different from normal.

He went home from work not feeling well, he had told his wife about a car chase, the foot chase and the struggle, and how he was a little tired, sore, and as he put it, “I am just not feeling right” This coming from a guy that never complained, to say, “I just don’t feel right!”. The next day, while driving into work in his nearly brand new 1972 Chevy Impala, He felt a tightness in his chest, then all of a sudden Officer Hurley grabbed his chest, he was in severe pain, his car began swerving back and forth in the street, concerned for those around him and their safety he worked to bring the car under control. At one point witnesses say they could see he was having trouble, and that he was in pain. A store owner that knew him, knew he was having a heart attack, he was heading the wrong way into traffic, and somehow still managed to prevent a head-on, he brought his car to rest against a pole and parked car, with little damage to either. A Witness that was taking his wife to a nearby banquet (but running late) saw the start of these events as Officer Hurley first began grabbing his chest at a red light. The witness went on to drop his wife off at the banquet and came back, to tell how heroic it was for a man in desperate pain to still divert an accident, bringing the car to rest without injuring anyone.


There was a minor traffic accident, but it could have been a lot worse. The heart attack took Officer Hurley from us that day, it came on as a result of the excitement and an injury Officer Hurley had the night before. He was injured but no one knew; he had told everyone he didn’t quite feel right; but there were no visible injuries so no one knew, that was when the heart attack occurred. One day after that with severe chest pains he received during a vehicle pursuit he would die. But even then he would die a hero, with more concerns for the safety of those around him then for the safety of himself.

Funeral services for Patrolman Robert M Hurley, an 18 year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department were held on 2 April 1973 at 1 PM at the Schimunek funeral establishment, 3331 Brehms Lane. Patrolman Hurley died of a heart attack Thursday 29 March 1973 while on his way home from work. He was 46 years old. Patrolman Robert M Hurley was born in Baltimore, attended city schools and once worked at Bethlehem Steel Corporation as a welder. In 1944, Patrolman Hurley joined the Navy and served as a gunner’s mate 3rd class in the Pacific. He was a charter member the Baltimore City Police Union and was on the personnel board. He was 2nd place president of the Union at the time of his death. Patrolman Hurley was also a co-founder, and charter member of the Police Council #27. He was survived by his wife Angelina Hurley; and their three sons, “Bruce, Robert, and Patrick Hurley” as well as three daughters, “Cynthia, Sharon, and Donna Marie Hurley” he also left behind two granddaughters. All are of Baltimore, also surviving is a brother Edgar Hurley, and his sister Joan Hurley.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten – RIP Officer Robert M. Hurley and God Bless - For your service "Honored" the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department"


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HERMAN A JONES SR
57-W: 19
End of Watch: May 26, 1993
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. At the end of a long, hard shift, Officer Jones stopped at a local carry out in the 1500 block of North Gay Street. Officer Jones had put on a light jacket over his uniform. While waiting for his order, three suspects, armed with guns, entered the establishment. Their criminal motive was robbery and the officer became the easy target. After being confronted at gunpoint and wanting to protect his life, as well as the life of the storeowner, Officer Jones heroically attempted to stop the robbery. Officer Jones pulled his weapon. During the exchange of gunfire, Officer Jones shot two of the three suspects and was mortally wounded. Officer Jones gave his life to protect another.

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WILLIAM JORDAN
23-E: 21
End of Watch: October 14, 1857
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1857 we lost our brother Sergeant William Jourdan to gun fire based on the following: The 1800’s was a mixing pot for Baltimore, made up of a different nationalities that were struggling to find their political direction. A city divided into wards, was literally fighting in the streets for control of everything from polling places to a political party. There was the “No Nothing Party” and “The Democratic Party” in 1957 alone there were tons of arrests were made for people shooting at police officers. While the police were charged with keeping the peace and maintaining order, it didn’t stop those they swore to protect from turning their guns on us, police were shot at, on a regular bases.

14 October 1857 was like any other day in Baltimore a confused society taking their misguided misinformed, political confusion out on the police. At the time, the police ran the city, the commissioner panel at time made up of Charles Howard, William H Gatchell, Charles Hinks, and John W Davis in itself was political, often these commissioners either went on to become Mayors, or were Mayors that later became police commissioners and ran the city government. It was frustrating, to the people of Baltimore a port town, made up of so many different nationalities, all vying for their place; some sort of identity and fair treatment. Sergeant William Jourdan, fell victim to a bullet fired at him while keeping order at a polling place when he was shot for no other reason than he wore a badge and uniform of a Baltimore Police Officer. He wasn’t out to arrest anyone, it wasn’t a wanted person, a robber, or thief, it was a voter in the 5th ward at Gay and Front Street ready to cast his ballot, but several Democratic candidates withdrew their names from consideration for seats on the city council. This served to quiet some of the trouble that had been brewing, but it didn’t stop a round from being fired off at approx. 1:30pm, with streets full of voters and political activist, a man on a roof of an Omnibus fired a pistol into the crowd. After discharging several rounds, many of the onlookers chased after him. the shooter ran through a store owned by Jehu Gorsush at the corner of Front and Gay Street, then onto the roof of that store, and finally escaped by descending trough an adjacent house. Once again those in the street began fighting, he situation demanded action by the on scene police, in order to prevent more fighting and an eventual riot.

Fortunate for nearly everyone there, one of the groups involved in the fighting retreated down High Street toward French Street. Wanting the retreat to continue, police did all they could to maintain the push moving them further out of the area. As police encouraged the crowd to continue their move, the shots started up again, this time from a window of the Democratic headquarters, “Jackson Hall”. One ball of the rounds struck Sgt Jourdan, killing him within minutes. Lieutenant Carmichael took over, transporting Sgt Jourdan’s lifeless body to his home near Ann Street and Eastern Avenue. 250 or more police attended his funeral, they came from all four districts. At 3:00pm on 15, October 1857, a procession led by fellow officers carried his body to the Baltimore Cemetery. When his death was reported in the Baltimore Sun, he was remembered as being “Faithful, full of a Zeal for good order, looking for “Peace” in our city”

There were seven people arrested and charged in this killing they were, 1) M. J. Grady, 2) Henry Burns, 3) Jas. Fawcett, 4) Thomas Murray, 5) William Quinn, 6) Chas. Reilly and 7) Peter Ward, each indicted in Baltimore city for the murder of Sergeant William Jourdan, each as principal and each as an accessory to the murder on or about 10 / 11th October, 1857.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

(250 officers in attendance, how times have changed, about 2,000 police officers gathered to bury John Platt and Kevin McCarthy - in either case, they will be remembered the same)


1 black devider 800 8 72 JAMES L JOYCE

25-E: 8
End of Watch: April 4, 1949
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Officer James Joyce, 42 years of age, was stopped on Falls Road near the city line in his patrol car. Another vehicle driven by Frank Love, 21 years of age hit the railing on the Falls Road bridge over the Pennsylvania Railroad causing it to go out of control. Love’s vehicle struck the left side of Officer Joyce’s radio car pushing it over the curb and up an embankment. Richard Farace, a passenger in Love’s car, was killed instantly. Officer Joyce received broken ribs, punctured lungs, and internal injuries, he was transported to Union Memorial Hospital where he died of his wounds.


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JOHN T KING JR
11-W: 6
End of Watch: December 28, 1936
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day 28 Dec 1936 in Baltimore Police History we lost our brother, Officer John T. King, Jr. as he was killed when he was stuck by a Vehicle on 27 Dec 1936 at 11:20PM. Officer King was struck by a motorist while crossing the intersection of Hoffman and Caroline Streets. He was treated for serious fractures of both legs, internal injuries, abrasions and shock. The next morning (this day 28 Dec 1936) Officer King succumbed to his injuries. He had joined the BPD on April 10, 1923 and served 13 years and 8 months.

MAN IS KILLED WHEN STRUCK BY AUTOMOBILE

The Sun (1837-1987); Dec 28, 1936;

pg. 14 

Policeman Badly Hurt

Patrolman John T. King, 43, of the 500 block of Morello Avenue, northeastern district, was seriously injured early this morning 28 December 1936 when he was struck by an automobile at Carolina and Hoffman streets. He was taken to St. Joseph’s Hospital, where his injuries were diagnosed as possible internal injuries and compound fractures of both legs.

William F. Higgins, the driver of the car, was charged with failing to give right away to a policeman and failing to have a registration card in his possession.

3 MORE DEATHS BOOST TRAFFIC TOLL UP TO 44
The Sun (1837-1987); Jan 21, 1937;
pg. 24

Held For Grand Jury

William Higgins, 20, of the, was held for the action of the grand jury yesterday by Dr. Gurley on the charge of causing the death of patrolman John T. King, 42, of the northeastern district. The accident occurred at Huffman and Caroline streets December 28, 1936, and the patrolman died the next day in St. Joseph’s Hospital

YOUTH IS EXONERATED IN POLICEMAN's DEATH
The Sun (1837-1987); Feb 11, 1937;
pg. 11

Used Is Exonerated In Policeman’s Death

William S. Higgins cleared in traffic accident fatal to officer John T. King

William F. Higgins, 20, yesterday was acquitted by Judge Roland K. Adams of the charge of manslaughter growing out of the killing by an automobile of patrolman John T. King at Hoffman and Caroline streets on December 27.

In the clearing Higgins, Judge Adam said he was not convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the policeman was in the pedestrian lane when it.

Testimony was that Higgins had drank a small quantity of beer before the accident, and judge Adams commented on this feature of the case, saying that the trail, as in other cases, led to a Tavern.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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WILLIAM S KNIGHT
20-E: 4
End of Watch: November 7, 1943
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer William S. Knight Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Sunday, November 7, 1943 Cause: Gunfire

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1943 we lost our brother Police Officer William S. Knight to gunfire based on the following:

Patrolman William Knight and his partner John J. Bianca were sent to the 1100 block of Rutland Ave. to investigate the trouble at a private club that dealt with politics. Upon arrival the officers, were informed that the people involved in the argument had left the club. As they received this information, gunshots rang out from a nearby alley. A black male was seen running from the alley and across the street; the officers gave chase and the suspect was caught by Officer Knight. The suspect that was captured told the officers, he saw a man in a tan jacket firing a pistol, and that he was only running to get out of the area. That suspect was placed in the rear of their radio car (keep in mind this was 1943 and the idea of a cage car wouldn’t come along for some time). The area was then further searched for the suspect in the tan jacket that was mentioned by the first suspect. As they were discussing how to handle the situation, the officers observed a man wearing a tan jacket run into an alley where the patrol car wouldn’t go. Officer Bianca chased the man on foot, while Officer Knight stayed with the first suspect and the radio car. The suspect dressed in tan reportedly doubled back to the radio car where he was confronted by Officer Knight. Shots were fired by both the suspect, and the officer, each striking the other in the chest. Officer Knight would stagger back to his radio car to call for help; he made that call and then passed out on the front seat. He was later taken to St. Joseph’s Hospital where he would be pronounced dead. The first man who was originally placed in the car, left the scene when Officer Knight died, he was never identified. The suspect shot by Officer Knight, Thomas Toler, a 20 year old male died on 8 November 1943.

Officer Knight had served the City for 7 years before this incident

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him


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FREDERICK K KONTNER
59-E: 17
End of Watch: February 10, 1967
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Appointed: December 29, 1960
Assigned: Northern District
Died: February 10, 1967
Length of Service: 6 years, 11 months - 

Baltimore Sun Article dated 02/11/1967 

A man who shot and wounded a Northern district policeman last night on a parking lot in the 2100 block of Guilford Avenue was killed minutes later in a barrage of police shotgun fire… Patrolman Kontner and Patrolman Raymond Tartel of the Northern District were driving [in the 2300 block of North Calvert] and spotted three “suspicious” men. The men apparently ran and Patrolman Kontner chased them on foot, but lost them momentarily. Patrolman Tartel took the wagon to the parking lot of the State office building, where one of three men pulled a pistol on him and took his service revolver, first police reports said. Suddenly, Patrolman Kontner came on the scene and the men fled. A car, where the chase wound up and the fatal shooting occurred, had been parked there minutes earlier… Patrolman Kontner was gunned down as he chased the suspect behind the old Department of Motor Vehicles building. (*Note: It is now the Department of Corrections / Parole and Probation) Patrolman Kontner served with the U.S. Marines from July 1956 until January 1957. He was active in the Marine Corps Reserves until the time of his death.

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EDWARD J KOWALEWSKI
15-W: 15
End of Watch: July 2, 1962
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Appointed: July 22, 1954
Assigned: Central District
Died: July 2, 1962
Length of Service: 8 years

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1962 we lost our brother Police  Officer Edward J. Kowalewski to Gunfire based on the following:

While attempting to assist a cab driver who was being robbed, Patrolman Kowalewski was shot and killed, he became the third Baltimore City Police Officer to be killed in 1962 - The Following Sun Paper Article best tells the events of 2 July, 1962


Suspect to be Charged

In Slaying of Policeman

July 3, 1962

Police said last night (2 July, 1962) they will charge a suspect today in connection with the slaying of a city policeman who was shot when he attempted to help a wounded cab driver at North Avenue and Charles street yesterday. The dead officer, is the third policeman killed in the line of duty this year. He was Patrolman Edward J. Kowalewski a 35 year-old father of four children and an eight years veteran of the department.

After receiving treatment for a bullet wound of the lower back at Maryland General Hospital. Mr. Rich had driven the suspect to Baltimore from Washington before the shooting. Washington police had issued a look out for a fugitive in an armed robbery that closely resembled the main custody, police said. The suspect, fleeing in another cab and pursued by a third cab, was captured by Patrolman Stanley Zawadski, a boyhood friend of slain officer at Orleans and Gay streets. Police said he was reloading his gun when taken into custody. Witnesses including a hold-up victim and the victim of an attempted hold-up each from Washington, viewed the suspect in lineups at Police Headquarters yesterday afternoon. Police identified the man as Ray Allen Nixt, 40, a waiter with no home address. Officers said he was paroled recently from Folsom Prison in California after serving ten years of a life sentence for armed robbery.

Cab drivers credited with aiding in the capture, were Zonnie Wisc. 34, who chased the fugitive and picked up Patrolman Zawadski on the way Charles L Wise, who was forced at gunpoint to drive him alway from the shooting scene and later disarmed him, and Charles II. Miller, 33, who saw the Hashing light alarm on the commandeered vehicle and forced it to the curb.

Patrolman Kowalewski whose home was at 1231 Church Street, Curtis Bay, will be given an inspector’s funeral Friday

Services will be held at 9:15 AM at the William S. Fialkowski Funeral establishment. 4200 Pennington Avenue, followed by a Requiem Mass at 10 A.M. at St. Athanasius Church, at Prudence and Church streets. Two other officers killed this year were Patrolman Henry Smith, Jr. killed April 7, while trying to break up a dice game in the 700 block West Lexington Street, mid Patrolman Richard Seebo killed May 26 by a motorist he stopped in the 300 block East Twentieth Street. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

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ROBERT HENRY KUHN
28-E: 11
End of Watch: July 22, 1965
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day 1965 we lost our brother Officer Robert Kuhn to gun fire based on the following:

On July 22, 1965 at the intersection of North Avenue and Ellamont Street, Officer Robert Kuhn observed a car double parked. He approached the vehicle and found it empty. As he looked inside the car, a suspect approached him from behind. The suspect shot Kuhn six times with a pistol. The suspect than took Officer Kuhn service revolver from his holster and shot him six more times. Police eventually killed the suspect. Investigation revealed that the suspect had narcotics inside of his vehicle. Officer Kuhn served in the U.S. Marine Corps from September 24, 1962 to March 23, 1963. He was active in the Marine Corps Reserves until the time of his death.

For more information we have pulled the following two news articles from the time of this incident

2 KILLINGS LAID

TO DAVID COOPER

Kuhn's, Nephew's Deaths

Charged After Meeting

By George J. Hiltner

David Cooper, 45, of the 2900 block Westwood Avenue, was charged by police yesterday with shooting and killing Western District Patrolman Robert H Kuhn, early Thursday morning (22 July 1965) Six other charges, including the shooting and killing of William Cooper, his 29 year old nephew, also were placed against Cooper. All were marked “Abated by death” since the accused man also died after police arrested him for the spree. The charges included three assaults on his arresting officers, Patrolman John Hess, James Griffin and Robert Powell: one charge of possessing marijuana, and one charge of possessing three deadly weapons, .22 and .38 caliber pistols, and a blackjack.

Decided at Conference 
The decision to institute charges against the elder Mr. Cooper and to accuse no one in connection with his death was made yesterday in a high-level conference attended by Charles E. Moylan. State's attorney, Capt. Wade Poole, of the Western District; Lt. Anton Glover, of the homicide squad, and Sgt. Hobert Lewis, also of homicide. Mr. Moylan stated that he also conferred with Dr. Charles S. Petty, assistant medical examiner for Maryland. The Slate's attorney complimented the Police Department for the "superlative job that had been done in piecing together the

Narrative of what occurred in the early morning hours of Thursday. “Mr. Moylan then said: “it appears incomprehensible that David Cooper shot officer: at least five times in the body, thereby causing his death. “Three pellets were recovered from the body of Officer Kuhn and a total of 15 gunshot wounds were found on his body. The attack was clearly unprovoked as Officer Kuhn was simply making a car check for double parking and a 3100 block of W. North Ave. “It also appears that David Cooper was responsible for the death of his nephew, William Cooper. Some minutes after shooting Officer Kuhn, the elder Cooper shot the nephew three times in the right temple with a .22 caliber revolver thereby causing his death. This revolver was recovered on Cooper at the time of his arrest. No charges will be placed against anyone for the death of David Cooper himself. Dr. Petty found Cooper to be suffering from advanced case of heart disease showing both an enlarged heart and significant clogging of the arteries. “The cardiac condition was such that any excessive strain might have well brought on the heart attack.

Cooper had himself extreme exertions of energy in the shooting of the officer, the apparent struggle with his nephew, his later violent resistance to the arrest on the street in the 1600 block of St. Stephen Street, in the cruising patrol going to Lutheran hospital and in the Lutheran hospital itself where he had to be physically restrained at the request of the doctors. “Cooper also was suffering from two gunshot wounds, one in the left elbow and one in the right ankle. It appeared that the gunshot wound inflicted by his own .22 caliber revolver during the struggle between him and his nephew which resulted in the nephew’s death. “At no time did any police officer in the case even drawl, let alone use his service revolver.

Blood on the blackjack “there were also superficial abrasions about Cooper’s head, some of which were certainly caused when the officers had to restrain him as he struggled to reach obtain possession of his .22 caliber revolver and some of which may have been inflicted by his nephew who had a homemade blackjack accessible to him, which was found on the rear seat of Cooper’s automobile. “It should be pointed out that when the officers first approached David Cooper on St. Stephen’s Street they noticed that he already has blood on his head and shirt and the blood was also found on the blackjack in the automobile. “At any rate, the abrasions were a very minor contributing factor at most since the autopsy showed no skull fracture of any sort and no blood clotting at all in the area of the brain.”

Ballistics Report  
Mr. Moylan further explained that the uncle in his first contact with patrolman Kuhn use another weapon, a 38 caliber pistol. And emptied it into the body of the police victim. Then he used a 22 caliber revolver to fire at the nephew and it was this weapon with which he himself was shot during the struggle with the younger relative, the State’s attorney said. This reconstruction of events is borne out by the finding of police ballistics expert yesterday that the 38 caliber bullets recovered from the body of patrolman Kuhn were fired from the weapon which David Cooper abandoned in the car. Ballistics findings also verified the bullets taken from the body of William Cooper were fired from a 22 caliber gun.

David Cooper Due Charge of Murder 
Chief Inspector says only change in facts or alter plans

The Police Department’s chief inspectors said last night that, barring new developments, the department expects to charge David Cooper with the murders of patrolman Robert Henry Kuhn and William Cooper early yesterday morning.

David Cooper died at 3:05 AM yesterday. Two hours after the shooting of the 23-year-old policeman and the discovery of William Cooper’s body slumped in the back seat of a car a few blocks away.

George J Murphy the chief inspector said he felt the facts that have been gathered so far in the case suggests David Cooper was responsible for the two shootings.

Await Ballistic Reports 
He said that if no new facts come in late, the department expects to police murder charges against the elder Cooper. A definite decision on the charge could not be made yesterday. Because the results of the ballistics and fingerprint test essential to the investigation will not be available until today. The charge, if made, will be academic in any case. In technical language, it will be ABATED by the death of the defendant

Inspector Murphy statement came at an end of the day of intensive investigation of the shooting of patrolman Kuhn and it to death that followed it. Investigation was hampered by the fact that there were no direct eyewitnesses accounting of any of the three shootings and that all of the principles are dead.

Scene Reconstructed 
However as new facts dribbled in investigating officers gradually built up a convincing picture of the scene that resulted in the shooting of patrolman Kuhn of the 3300 block of Glen arm Avenue. Police felt certain the patrolman Kuhn was shot to death with a 22 caliber revolver by David Cooper 45, of the 2900 block of Westwood Avenue. After the officer stopped him in the 3100 block of W. North Ave. about 1:15 AM for a parking violation of routine check. A few minutes later, police theorized, David Cooper shot and killed his 29-year-old nephew, William R Cooper of the 2300 block of Norfolk Street. When the younger man refused to cooperate with his uncle.

David Cooper was arrested by police less than a half-hour after the shootings. He died at Lutheran hospital at 3:05 AM following a struggle with policeman in a patrol car.


15 Bullet Holes in Body 
Dr. Charles S Petit Junior assistant medical examiner, said yesterday afternoon that David Cooper died of a severe heart condition combined with the several injuries he had received. Dr. Petty said patrolman Kuhn died of gunshot wounds. He said 322 caliber bullets were found in his body, and that there were 15 bullet holes in his body. William Cooper died of bullet wounds in the head caused by 322 caliber bullets. Dr. Petty said that the bullets that killed patrolman Kuhn might have come from the same gun with which William Cooper was shot but of that he could not be certain.

Only one witness, firefighter Carlos a Down’s of the firehouse at North Avenue in hell not Street observed a part of the scene.

Six Or Eight Shots 
He told police that he was sitting at the desk in the firehouse when he heard a shot, got up and went to the door. About 90 feet away on the south side of North Avenue he saw a man pointing a gun at the sidewalk in front of him Mr. Downs told police.

He then heard six or eight shots in rapid succession. He said he thought at the time that the man was drunk and just shooting. Mr. Downs said at first he did not see what the man was shooting at. He said he saw the man with the gun get into the black and white convertible and driving east on North Avenue. Mr. Downs said the patrolman Kuhn’s gun was still in his holster as he lay on the ground. He said the officer was still alive when he got to him, “moaning” and “bleeding real bad.”

Found Car And Body 
A police dragnet was thrown around the area, and a patrol car a few minutes later found William Cooper laying in the back seat of a black and white convertible in the 1600 block of St. Stephen Street. Searching the car, police found a 38 caliber automatic and a handmade blackjack. A few minutes later, officers in another patrol car apprehended David Cooper, who was running in the 2000 Block Pressbury St. the officers report they saw blood on his hand and certain when they arrested him.

He will forever be missed, but never forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.. God Bless and Rest in Peace.


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JOHN LANAHAN
25-E: 1
End of Watch: July 3, 1919
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. On this day in Baltimore Police History 1919 we lost our brother - Police  Officer John J. Lanahan to gunfire based on the following
The sun paper reports as follows / Burglar Kills Turnkey. Prisoner Shoots Policeman in Central Station House. Fires While Being Searched. Slaying By Confessed Thief In the Presence of Lieutenant and Several Other Bluecoats. Turnkey John J. Lanahan, 57 years old of the Central Police Station, whose home is at 2028 Robb Street, Northeast Baltimore, was shot to death at 8:55 o’clock yesterday morning by Frank Wozulak, 31 years old, an un-naturalized Russian Pole, who the night before burglarized the office of the American Railway Express Company’s office at Sudbrook, on the Western Maryland railroad. The murder of Turnkey Lanahan happened before the eyes of Lieut. W. F. Klinefelter and Patrolman Crass and Traupe, of the Central District, a few minutes after Crass and Traupe had taken Wozniak to the police station for examination as to his possession of watches and jewelry, which he was trying to dispose of to Harrison Street second-hand dealers. Two shots were fired by Wozniak, one entering Turnkey Lanahan’s breast and the other going through the open window of a partition and lodging in the plastered wall of the signal operator’s office. Headquarters Detective J. F. Dougherty, of the homicide squad, in making an investigation after the shooting, obtained information indicating that Wozniak fired the shots with the idea of affecting his escape after realizing that imprisonment was inevitable. Slayer Admits Robberies. Wozniak was questioned yesterday afternoon by Capt. A. L. League, of the Central District, and he admitted that for several weeks he had gone on thieving expeditions. He confessed that he went to Sudbrook Station Wednesday night, broke into the office and rifled express packages, seeking money and jewelry. He made his escape with two boxes containing watches and when he attempted to sell the watches yesterday, Patrolman Crass arrested him. Crass did not call for patrol, and as the prisoner offered no resistance he walked him to the police station. Wozniak was before the desk in the usual manner and there was nothing in his attitude to indicate that he contemplated either escape or attack. He gave his name and address as 1637 Eastern Avenue. He said later, however, that he had not lived at the Eastern Avenue address for several weeks, and this statement was verified by police of the Eastern District. Lieutenant Klinfelter called Turnkey Lanahan, and in his usual jovial, sympathetic manner Lanahan approached the prisoner. “Come, by boy, let me see what you’ve got,” said the turnkey as he raised Wozniak’s hands and started to feel the pockets of his coat. At this juncture Patrolman Crass was standing a few feet from the prisoner and Patrolman Traupe was standing at the entrance to the corridor leading to the lock-up, Patrolman Kerns and Kelly, housemen, were behind the desk and Captain League was at his desk. Backs Away and Fires. As Turnkey Lanahan raised his hands Wozniak backed away a pace, drew a pistol from his right hip pocket and fired two shots. One bullet struck the turnkey and the other wall. Crass and Traupe pounced upon Wozniak and Captain League, with drawn pistol, ran from his desk. The prisoner was beaten into helplessness and was dragged away. His arms were held by four policemen. The pistol was taken from his hand and a second weapon was taken from his pocket. Twenty bullets were found in another pocket. The Central ambulance was on call, but no time was lost getting Turnkey Lanahan to Mercy Hospital. Policemen carried him to the automobile of Frank H. Cook, 318 North Charles Street, and Mr. Cook speeded to Mercy Hospital. Dr. Eustace H. Allen, of the surgical staff, pronounced Turnkey Lanahan dead. The bullet penetrated his heart, causing internal hemorrhage. Statement Made by Wozniak. “… I can’t say why I shot the man and don’t know why I pulled the pistol from my pocket.” Turnkey Lanahan was regarded as one of the most efficient turnkeys in the department. He was known particularly because of his kindness and consideration for prisoners, and he always tried to cheer them while in his custody. He was appointed to the department 19 years ago. He had been one of the alternating turnkeys at the Central Police Station for seven years.

He was survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Lanahan; two sons, who are in the armed forces of the United States, and two daughters.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Lanahan


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FRANK L LATHAM
6-E: 3
End of Watch: March 2, 1924
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer Frank L. Latham Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Sunday, March 2, 1924 Cause: Gunfire 

On this day in Baltimore Police History (2 March 1924) we lost our brother Police  Officer Frank L. Latham to gunfire based on the following from the Baltimore Sun 3 March 1924:

Headline - Patrolman Latham Dies from Wounds 

Policeman Shot by Man in House Succumbs to Johns Hopkins Hospital

Schmidt Sought as Killer

Harry Worth, who took Officer to Residents in Automobile Tells of Shooting

Patrolman Frank Latham, shot while on duty Friday night, died yesterday morning 2 March 1924

police and detectives working on the case were roused by the news to great figure in the search for the killer. Miss Ethel last him the murdered patrolman’s wife, and Mrs. Sophia lath him his mother, were at his bedside at Johns Hopkins hospital when the end came. The night before doctors had pronounced the patient out of danger, following a blood transfusion from motorcycle patrolman Lewis Zulauf.

An internal hemorrhage of the womb near the heart set in early yesterday. Patrolman lath him lapsed into a coma and died without regaining consciousness.

Informed of her husband’s death, miss lath him fainted. Lassen’s mother, who, ill herself, was present against her physicians advices seemed stunned.

Alleged a murderer salt 
The murder, police say is Leon Schmidt five of 11 South Collington Ave. no trace of him has been found. It was believed that first that he had escaped in his automobile. Lieut. Michael Ward and Sgt. Charles Davis located the machinery yesterday at the garage of CW Weller at 2016 E. Madison Avenue Weller according to the police said Schmidt had left the machine there a few days before the shooting to be repaired.

Friday night about an hour after the shooting, Weller said Smith came to the garage and tried to get his car. At that time he was dressed in a ragged coat and Weller was uncertain whether he wore a hat or cap. Smith, Weller said appeared excited.

Harry worth, of 418 North Gay St. went to the Eastern police station yesterday and identified himself as the man who drove lath them and Smith’s home on the night of the shooting. He told police he will come forward sooner, but did not think his statement was of importance. He was told he would be one of the most important witnesses in the prosecution of Schmidt when he is caught and charged with the shooting.

Gives account of shooting  
Worth gave an account of the shooting as follows “I was approached Friday night at Patterson Park Avenue and Baltimore Street by policeman who asked me to drive him to five of 11 South Collington Ave. He said there was some trouble there.”

“We went to the side alley and up the back stairs. With the aid of his light the patrolman’s searched in the front room and then the back room but found nothing.”

Tells of four shots 
I“in the middle room the man stepped out as the policeman opened the door. The officer told him he was wanted” “you don’t want me the man said and with these words the door was partly closed. I heard four successive shots and then another and then someone said “you would’ve done the same for May” I did not have a pistol or a light and I’d groped my way down the stairs and out front.”

An inquest will be held at 9 o’clock tonight at the Northeast police station by Dr. J. AIDS. S. Potter coroner.

Detectives asserted farms 
A party of four headquarters detectives armed with riot guns and wearing bulletproof vests left Baltimore in automobile yesterday morning for Wilmington Delaware on information that Schmidt was hiding on a farm near there. Those who made up the party were detectives Robert Bradley, Frederick Carol, Charles

Birmingham, and Frank Coleman

Failing to find any trace of Schmidt in or near Wilmington, the party went to Hillsboro Caroline County where they searched in the form of Alexander Kurtinski. They returned last night empty-handed after a trip of more than 375 miles

 

May he never be forgotten

"His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department"


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RICHARD J LEAR
20-E: 15
End of Watch: October 8, 1985
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Shortly after 11:00 p.m. on October 8, 1985, alarms were sounding at several locations in the 5300 block of York Road. A marked police vehicle responded and so did Officer Lear. To get to the scene, Officer Lear had to cross several lanes of York Road. As he crossed, he was struck by a northbound vehicle traveling well above the posted speed limit. The driver never stopped. Doctors at Sinai Hospital pronounced him dead just before midnight. Miles away in Baltimore County, Police stopped a vehicle which they saw was being driven in an erratic manner. The operator was arrested. A short time later, a civilian who knew of the traffic accident, which killed Officer Lear, spotted the car in a parking lot and notified authorities that, in turn, called Baltimore Police Accident Investigators to the scene. The automobile was transported to the Headquarters Building for processing. As a result of the investigation, charges of Automobile Manslaughter, leaving the scene of an accident, driving while intoxicated and excessive speed were filed against a 29 year old Baltimore resident. Officer Richard Lear was a veteran of 31 years on the department.

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JOHN T LLOYD
16-E: 5
End of Watch: July 4, 1889
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. On this day in Baltimore police history 1889 we lost our brother patrolman John T Lloyd to gunfire based on the following:

On 4 July, 1889while clearing a corner, Officer Lloyd was attacked by for men, one of which shot him three times at close range, so close in fact that the muzzle flash set the officers jacket on fire. Shot three times, and severely beaten, Patrolman Lloyd managed not only to survive for several hours, and to give a deposition as to what happened, but he held onto one of his attackers, “the suspect that shot him”, until back-up had arrived.

Baltimore Sun newspaper article dated 5 July 1889 entitled shot down on duty

Shot Down On Duty
Another Victim of Violence
Patrolman John T Lloyd Killed

5 July 1889

Samuel Cooper arrested one charge of murder – four men accused of being accessories – the police Commissioner and states attorney Kurt ask the governor to request attorney general Whyte to assist in the prosecution

The present year has been a remarkable one for the Baltimore on account of the unusual number of deaths by violence that have occurred. The latest victim was patrolman John T Lloyd of the southern district, who was shot about 1:30 o’clock yesterday 4 July, 1889 morning at the northeast corner of light and West Street.

Complaint had been made at the southern district police station of men loafing and disturbing the peace at that corner patrolman Lloyd have been ordered to give it his attention. A crowd of men were there, and when the patrolman ordered them to keep quiet and they did not obey him he attempted to arrest one of the number. Resistance was made to this action, and he was shot in addition to being roughly handled. The patrolman’s clothing was set on fire by the shots, which indicated that the assailant stood close to him at the time. Samuel Cooper, Edward Doyle, James Reynolds, James Toole, and Thomas H Hudson were arrested in connection with the shooting. Cooper is charged with being the man who fired the shots and the others are accused of being accessories. They were committed to jail by Justice Donovan for a hearing at 3 o’clock next Monday afternoon. The police are also looking for other men were supposed to have been connected with the assault.

WHERE THE BULLETS ENTERED

Patrolman Lloyd was carried into the drugstore on the corner and afterword ran over to his home for 18 Conway St. in a patrol wagon. He was attended to by Dr. George a Strauss and Dr. John E Blake who found that he had been shot twice. One of the bullets entered his abdomen about 2 inches and a half to the right of the Naval and ranged downward. The second bullet passed straight through the thigh. Dr. George a Strauss says that in addition to these there was a glancing well in the abdomen in close proximity to the first welcomed. The doctor says the wounds in the abdomen both had a downward course. The best, certain and undershirt were burned, which clearly indicates the shots were fired at close range. The doctor recovered in the clothing of the wounded patrolman a bullet of 38 caliber, which was the one that caused the glancing wound spoken of. Death was caused by shock and internal hemorrhage.

LLOYDS DEPOSITION

Lieut. Bruchey and Justice Donovan awakened, who took the patrolman’s deposition, as follows:

“In patrolling my beat I went up to light Street to West Street, and I found Samuel Cooper and three or four other standing on the corner. I said to Cooper, “do not make so much noise; the proprietor of the drugstore will come down and complain.” Cooper replied, “what are you talking about?” And without any further provocation, pulled out a pistol and fired three shots. Then he and Ed Doyle whom I recognized, and two or three others whom I did not recognize, jumped on me.”

VISITING THE SALOONS

Patrolman knocks all party of young men visiting the saloons in the neighborhood of the shooting, and about 1:15 Saul them come out of Wiesner’s saloon, one cross street. The men showed that they had been drinking, but were not acting in such a manner as to justify their arrest. They walked down light Street toward West and the patrolman went in an opposite direction, and had gotten to the corner of light and Hamburg when he heard the shots.

ARRESTED BY SGT. CHAILOU

Sgt. Chailou was standing at the corner of light and cross streets, when he heard for shots. He ran to the corner of light West streets, and was the first officer to arrive on the scene. The Sgt. saw two men struggling on the ground and pulling the top man off, when he recognized him as Cooper. He did not recognize the under man as patrolman Lloyd at first. Cooper said to the Sgt., “let me go; I’ve not done anything.” The patrolman said, “I am shot,” and pointed out Cooper as the man who would shot him, whereupon Cooper was arrested.

PICKING UP THE OTHERS

Patrolman Ludwig was standing at the corner of light and Hamburg streets and heard for shots. He ran to the scene and saw Sgt. Chailou with Cooper under arrest and help to take the prisoner to the patrol box. The officers then carried the world of patrolman into the drugstore. In response to inquiry from patrolman Ludwig as to who had shot him, patrolman Lloyd said Cooper had done it. The officers afterwards arrested Edward Doyle and James Reynolds. The two men were in the crowd when the officers arrived. Bread walked away when Cooper was arrested. They were caught several blocks away. Tool and Hudson were arrested later in the day, being known as to of the crowd that had traveled around that night. It will be noticed that the patrolman say they heard for shots.

WHAT MR. STRAUSS SAW

William Strauss jeweler 1128 Light St., was looking out his window when the shooting occurred. He heard the patrolman warned the men, and says that when the first shot was fired he saw one man, whom he believed it to be Cooper, run into the middle of the street, followed by the officer, who explained, “I am shot!” Another shot was fired, and patrolman fell to the ground, when the third shot was fired. Three or four men then jumped on the patrolman, who had hold of one of the men. Mr. Strauss was hastening to the assistance of the patrolman Lloyd when the other officers arrived.

SOMETHING GLISTENED

James that Nancy, and ice cream dealer on cross street, near light Street, was detained late at his place of business on the night of the third on account of fourth of July orders. He says: “about 1:30 o’clock I was standing at the corner of light and cross street talking to patrolman Lamb. I heard four distinct shots, and we birth hurried to the scene. I sold the two men struggling on the ground. I heard Cooper say, “Christ I did not suit that man.” At the same time I saw Cooper hand something that glistened to one of the men standing near him. The man was standing on the opposite side of Sgt. Chailou, but I cannot say what it was Cooper handed him. I saw patrolman Lloyd lying in the gutter, and assisted to carry him into the drugstore and afterword to put him into the patrol wagon. The waistband of his trouser was on fire.” After the shooting the officer searched diligently for the pistol. The iron gutter plates were taken up in every and corner examined, but the weapon was not found.

DEATH OF THE VICTIM

The world of patrolman lay in great agony all day. He was attended by doctors George a Strauss and John E Blake Fielder cook and W. H. Smith. Ropes were stretched across the street and a guard of police were stationed at the house to prevent intrusion. Lloyd died at 840 o’clock in the evening, having never recovered from the shock of the worms. Coroner Benson was notified, and will have a postmortem examination made this morning. The inquest will be held Sunday at the southern police station. The interment of the body of the deceased patrolman will be on Sunday.

Patrolman Lloyd was 30 years of age and unmarried. He was a native of Baltimore, and the nephew of William J Lloyd of Lloyd’s hotel, and of Edward Lloyd of the Peabody house. His father was John Lloyd contractor and Miller. He resided with his parents. He was appointed to the police force as a probationer 24 August, 1888, and was promoted to be a regular officer one to November of the same year. Previous to his appointment on the police force he was a truck driver and also worked with his father for a time.

SKETCH OF COOPER

Samuel Cooper the accused is about 30 years of age and an engineer. He was born in Baltimore ended with his widowed mother and two unmarried sisters at 1257 William St. He comes of a respectable family and has a good reputation in the neighborhood. About three years ago he was employed in the United States customs service in Baltimore. He was first when United States customs launch search as watchmen and afterwards as firemen, being employed for two years in these positions. He then secured a situation on a baseline steamer Carolina as engineer in charge of the electric lights. He left this position about three months ago. Since which time he has been unemployed. The father of the accused, Henry Cooper, was a ship carpenter. His uncle John Durr, is chief engineer of the steamer Carolina. He also has a married brother, George Cooper, the on light Street. Mrs. Cooper was prostrated by the shock when she heard of the charge made against her son, and was unable to leave her bed.

The men who are charged with being accessories to the killing are all young. Their occupations and residences are as follows Edward Doyle is a machinist and lives in 1468 William St. James Reynolds is a candle maker living at 1237 Durst alley. James tool is a brush maker and the 1524 Johnson St. Thomas H Hudson is a labor and lives at 1213 Wall Street. None of them would make a statement in regard to the shooting. While they are all known to the police, none of them have ever been arrested except for minor offenses. Doyle was sent to jail for 10 days some time ago for assaulting a patrolman, this being the most serious charge against any of them.

PROMPT ACTION OF THE COMMISSIONERS

The police commissioners held a special session to discuss the shooting of patrolman Lloyd. After the consultation with states attorney to her the following letter was sent to Gov. Jackson

“Sir: after consultation with the state’s attorney we believe, owing to the frequency of late of murders in this city, especially the brutal character of the attempt to murder John T Lloyd, of the police force which looks at this moment as if it would result fatally, that it is our duty to call your attention to this deplorable condition of affairs, said that in connection with the states officers of the city such prompt and effective measures may be adopted as that speedy punishment may be met out to this class of offenders against the laws of our state, thereby deterring others from the perpetration of like offenses. “One of the difficulties in the speedy trial and prompt punishment of the offenders is the right to remove their cases from the jurisdiction of the court of Baltimore city, thereby causing delay and further making it necessary to bring into the prosecution of the case those not familiar with the conception, as the states attorneys of Baltimore city is not always able to assist in the trial at the court to which the case may be removed.

“Believing, therefore that it will greatly promote and assist in the prom presentation and trial of such case to have some representation of the state connected to them from their inception to their finish, no matter in what court of the state they may be tried, we think we are justified in suggesting to you that the attorney general of the state be requested to assist the states officer of Baltimore in the prosecution of the case against the assailants of officer John T Lloyd this letter was signed by E. M. Shriver, John Q. A. Robson, John Gill Junior, who the police commissioners.

STATES ATTORNEY TO THE GOVERNOR

States attorney her wrote the following to the governor: “my dear Gov. – the shooting of policeman Lloyd last night has aroused feeling of dairy just indignation on the part of all good citizens of Baltimore, and the prompt trial and punishment of the offenders is demanded by every consideration of the peace and good order of this community by looking to send this case out of jurisdiction situation with the board of police commissioners and I join with them in the clearest request that you will at once officially asked the Atty. Gen. to give me the benefit of his assistance in the prosecution of the case referred to.”

In the afternoon Marshall Fray and Mr. John Gill one of the commissioners, visit Lloyd and found him in a prostrate condition.

RECORD OF POLICEMAN KILLED

Since the organization of the present Metropolitan police force three policeman and one detectives have been killed while in the discharge of their duty.

Policeman Murphy of the Western district was arresting a man named daring on the Fourth of July when he was struck on the head by the prisoners brother was a Billy the officer took his man to the station house with the officer laid down upon a bench and died. Daring serving a term in the penitentiary. Policeman John Christopher of the Western district was accidentally killed while resting to colored men on a picnic on Frederick Avenue.

Detective Richardson was killed on Franklin Street between you tall and Pat the Street while attempting to arrest a man.
Patrolman Clark of the middle District was killed about 15 years ago in the performance of his duty he was standing on the corner of holiday and center Street one night when the cries of murder issued from a house of ill repute. The officer ran to the house and was told that a woman was being beaten. He went upstairs to the woman’s room, and when he reached the top floor he was shot dead. A man named Thomas Cusack was arrested for that murder patrolman Clark was the father of Lidia Cole about home Logue was shot last Wednesday.

Under the old Police Department two noticeable cases occurred when policemen were killed. They were patrolmen Benjamin Benton and Robert M Rigdon. Those murders took place in the old “plug ugly” days Patrolman Benton was killed in the western part of the city by a set of roughens, and for his testimony at trial of man accused came the killing of Rigdon who was first threatened and then murdered. Harry Gambrill, Marian Cropps and Peter Corrie were hanged for these murders, at the same time James Stephens, alias Cephas was hanged for the murder of William Chang, Keller did. It is stated that 39,000 persons witnessed the hanging, which took place one 8 April 1859.

11 DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE

Since the first of last January 11 persons have lost their lives in the city by violence. The following is the last of the persons against whom charges of murder have been brought, with the names of the victims:
8 January –Kunigunda Betz, murder of Margaret Schueider, her employer. Owing to the dedicated condition of the accused the case has not yet been tried.

12 January – George S Pembroke, colored, murdered of young Edward Lampson by shooting. The case was transmitted to the circuit court for Baltimore County, the jury rendering a verdict of murder in the first degree a motion for a new trial was granted, whereupon Pembroke pleaded guilty to murder in the second degree and was sentenced to 15 years in the penitentiary

15 January – Danny Williams, Keller did, infanticide. Found guilty of manslaughter, with recommendation to mercy, and sentenced to six months in jail.

28 January – William E Johnson, Keller did, murder of James E. Lee, Keller did, by stabbing him at Ford’s opera house. This case was also removed the Baltimore County court. A verdict of manslaughter was rendered. The accused being sent to the penitentiary.

22 February – James Duffy, murder of Jane Harris by throwing a lighted coal oil lamp at her. He was declared not guilty.

1 March – Thomas Heiman – murder of Josh will Evans by shooting in a saloon on W. Fayette St. At the trial in Baltimore the jury disagreed, whereupon the case was removed to the Carroll County court. At the second trial Heiman was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to three years in the penitentiary

16 March – William Shannon – murder of any are no alias Blanche Gray. By cutting her with a knife. This case has not yet been tried

26 May – Michael J McMahon, George W McCubbin and Benjamin a Steinman, murder of James T Kirby by shooting. The case is pending

16 June – Oliver Hinds, murder of James E Hotze – by hitting him in the left temple with a brick. Hinds was presented by the grand jury last week.

27 June – William W. Christopher, who is charged with killing Charles P Logue by shooting him with a pistol. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Lloyd

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AUBREY L LOWMAN
9-W: 12
End of Watch: April 19, 1954
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

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ARTHUR H MALINOFSKI
62-E: 7
End of Watch: October 31, 1935
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1935 we lost our brother Police Officer Arthur H. Malinofski to gunfire based on the following: Officer Malinofski was discovered several feet from his patrol car dead from two gunshot wounds. A milkman discovered the body lying on the ground on Main Avenue near Gwynn Oak Avenue at approximately 4 a.m. According to news reports at the time, “it was about 4 o’clock when Patrolman Malinofski, flashlight in hand, parked his car on a lot just off Maine Avenue, and begun a routine inspection of rear doors. The beam of his light, General Gaither, Commissioner of Police, surmised, fell on ‘somebody doing something he shouldn’t have been doing.’ Caught in the flood of light, that ‘somebody’ fired at the patrolman before the latter had a chance to reach for his gun, which hung in a holster from his hip. This was possible, the police said, for the holster was untouched, the gun not moved and ‘no good officer who arrests a man would continue to hold his flashlight in his hand.’ Patrolman Anthony Staylor and Henry Levinson arrested the suspect, Oscar Norfolk, 30. Mr. Norfolk was questioned by Lieutenant Edward Hitzelberger and then booked as “suspected of assault and shooting.” Off. Malinofski had 9 years of service with the police department and was survived by his wife Gladys.

MAN ARRESTED AS SUSPECT IN POLICE MURDER Nov 1, 1935

Said To Have Long Criminal Record; Quizzed At Northwestern HELD FOR FURTHER QUESTIONING TODAY Patrolman Malinofski Shot Through Heart Early Yesterday

MAN ARRESTED AS SUSPECT IN POLICE MURDER Nov 1, 1935

Said To Have Long Criminal Record; Quizzed At Northwestern HELD FOR FURTHER QUESTIONING TODAY Patrolman Malinofski Shot Through Heart Early Yesterday

A man arrested early this morning was docketed as .James Snail, 1O00 block Walbrook avenue. 

SEARCH FOR POLICE SLAYER CONTINUES Nov 2, 1935

Six Suspects In Malinofski Slaying Released After Questioning QUIZZED BY MINTIENS Detective Captain Reports More Than 100 Persons Have Telephoned With "Tips" On Case

DISREGARDS THIRD MALINOFSKI BULLET Dec 15, 1935

Lieut. Coll Calls Finding Of Pellet In Door Jamb Of ''No Significance" Test Shows Slug Was Fired From Pistol Used By Policeman's Slayer

The -finding yesterday of a third bullet at the scene of the murder of Patrolman Arthur Malinofski is "ol no significance," according to Lieutenant James Coll, of the Northwestern district, after the bullet had been turn. over to him.

Off. Malinofski was checking businesses on the midnight shift near Maine Ave. & Gwynn Oak Avenue. As he was checking businesses he came upon a man trying to pry open a rear door to one of them. The man spun around and fired two shots striking the officer. A milkman making deliveries nearby was drawn to the gunfire and discovered Off. Malinofski laying near the curb. He died from his wounds shortly thereafter. 

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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WILLIAM J MARTIN
37-E: 1
End of Watch: October 10, 1989
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Two Central District officers were shot, one fatally, while responding to a complaint of narcotics being sold in an apartment building in the 1500 block of Pennsylvania Avenue. Officer William J. Martin, 38, a ten-year veteran, entered the building and walked up a flight of stairs to a landing when he encountered a 20 year-old suspect who shot him twice in the head and once in the left shoulder. He died at the Shock Trauma Unit at University Hospital. Detectives believe that the suspect ran to the lower level in an attempt to escape through a rear door when he encountered Officer Herman L. Brooks, Jr., 36. The two-year veteran and the suspect exchanged gunfire. Officer Brooks was struck twice, once in the chest and the other in his left ring finger. He was treated for his wounds and recovered. The suspect was wounded in the abdomen during the exchange of shots with Officer Brooks. He was treated for his wounds and will recover. Central District officers had responded to two previous calls to that address earlier that morning, one call was a narcotics complaint, the second was for a disorderly person. A 21 year-old suspect was also arrested by officers as he attempted to escape form the apartment building. Officers recovered a .39 caliber Colt automatic from the lower level hallway. Officer Herman Brooks, Jr.’s life was saved, the University Hospital doctors say, by the departmentally issued soft-body armor.

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WALTER PATRICK MATTHYS
53-E: 5
End of Watch: September 11, 1964
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Appointed: June 11, 1964
Assigned: Eastern District
Died: September 11, 1964
Length of Service: 3 months 

On September 11, 1964, at approximately 12:13 p.m., Officer Matthys responded to a call for a disturbance at Edythe Street and Central Avenue. While talking to the suspect, he assaulted Officer Matthys. During the struggle, the mentally deranged subject grabbed the young officer’s gun and shot him. As the officers slumped to the ground, the suspect continued to shoot while Officer Matthys’ body laid on the ground. The officer was shot five times and witnesses reported that the suspect “just walked away.” Officer Matthys served in the U.S. Army from January 23, 1961 to January 22, 1964.


Central and Edythe Streets

"The King"
Cleaven Dupree

On September 11, 1964 in Baltimore City Police History 1964, we lost our brother Police Officer Walter Patrick Matthys based on the following. Officer Matthys was fresh out of the academy, as he walked a foot post in Baltimore’s Eastern District. He was full of pride and enthusiasm as are most Baltimore Police officers at that stage of their careers. Officer Matthys came on at a time where rookies learned their own way, they walked their post and were more often molded into the police they would become by the people they meet, the good folks in the community teach them compassion, the criminals teach them respect, respect for life, respect for what’s right, and respect for the laws, laws that would be used as a tool to control those that are on the wrong side of it. Officer Matthys first day of patrol was September 7th 1964 just five days before he would walk foot and find himself on the corner of Central and Edythe Streets where he would meet up with a suspect simply known in the area as “The King” – The King aka Cleaven Dupree was recently released from a mental hospital. In fact Dupree had been in and out of jail and metal hospitals most of his life 43 arrests for various crimes and 11 times to Crownsville Mental Hospital to be exact. Dupree was called “The King” because everywhere he went he was seen wearing a crown studded with costume jewels. He was most commonly known for the Crown he wore, but was also known for his constantly getting into trouble. Veteran officers know who the trouble is on their post(s). Even a seasoned rookie will get to know who they need to watch out for, and who they need to get back-up for before approaching, or approaching with a plan. But times were different in 1964, no radios to call for a back-up, and some of the old timers didn’t take rookies under their wing and teach them the ropes the way they did after this incident took place. In this case a young rookie, approached a suspect for disturbing the public, he tried to talk to him, tried to calm him down, but the suspect only got louder, became more of a public nuisance and the young officer had no choice but to tell him he was under arrest. Officer Matthys proceeded to grab Dupree by his belt to take him into custody when Dupree already distraught quickly came up with other ideas; he became more agitated and began to fight Officer Matthys in one of the most violent, and vicious manners anyone of the many witnesses has ever seen.  Dupree was a tall, skinny, delusional man full of anger and rage; and he quickly overtook the young inexperienced officer, taking him by surprise he grabbed him round the waist and threw him to the ground. Storeowners and other onlookers looked on with horror as this known mental patient had an advantage over the young officer, fighting him to the ground and then while on the ground, it wasn’t over. The officer was down and had no way of defeating Dupree, Dupree had won, but it wasn’t enough, he would continue assaulting Officer Matthys punching and kicking him while he was down until he eventually reached down and ripped the young officers gun from its holster and began to unloaded it into the officer’s body. During the initial fight several witnesses called the station to get help for Officer Matthys, but none of the witnesses themselves would come to his aide; they all just stood in shock and just watched as a young man was being killed while they waited for police to come do what few others have the courage to do. After firing the officer’s gun into him, and obviously killing him, Dupree would stand over his lifeless body and fire more shots into him, until the gun was empty, then he simply walked away as if nothing had happened.  Police quickly swarmed the area where they had no trouble locating and arresting Dupree, he was still wearing his toy plastic crown. Officer Matthys was taken to Church Home Hospital where he was pronounced dead from his injuries.
Dupree was captured and eventually taken to court where he proved to be unable to stand trial, so he was taken to Crownsville where he would remain for the rest of his life.
 Officer Walter P. Matthys served the city of Baltimore for just 5 days, and on the 5th day he taught us all a lesson that would somewhat change the way things were done, the way veterans would treat rookies. Some veterans remained hard asses but for the most part, veterans would slowly begin to give warnings to the young rookies, telling them what to look for, and what to lookout for, how to handle mental patients, trouble makers and hard core criminals. All of this was of little conciliation to Officer Walter P. Matthys’ young widowed bride, for not only was Officer Matthys new to the department, but he was also newly married to Mrs. Shirley Anne Mattys who he left behind.
As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

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GEORGE M J MAY
1-E: 10
End of Watch: February 12, 1928
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 12 Feb 1928 we lost our brother Police Sergeant George M. J. May - Sergeant May was killed in the line of duty when he and another officer, were struck by a streetcar near the Hanover street bridge. The accident involved the police coupe, a delivery truck and a street car. Sergeant May, was driving a coupe along the bridge, when due to another accident started to turn around in the middle of the structure to pull up in front of a police booth there, according to reports, a Curtis Bay street car then struck his machine. Patrolman John Peters, witnessed the accident, started to provide assistance only to be struck by a delivery truck that was being operated by John Fuchs of the 2000 block Aiken Street. Patrolman Peters suffered a broken leg. Sergeant May received a gash on the head from which he later died at South Baltimore General Hospital from complications.
As we take this time to remember Sergeant May, and thank him for his service and sacrifice, we his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department want him to know will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and Rest in Peace.


KEVIN JOSEPH MCCARTHY

45-W: 22
End of Watch: October 14, 2000
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On this day in Baltimore Police History 2000, we lost our brothers, Sergeant Platt and Officer Kevin McCarthy who were killed when their patrol car as it was broadsided in that Hamilton intersection by a drunk driver. The two officers were on routine patrol in a residential area when the driver of a full size pickup truck failed to obey a stop sign causing the collision.

The impact caused the officer’s patrol car to flip over and strike a utility pole. Both officers were killed instantly. Neither occupant of the pickup truck was injured. The driver of the vehicle was charged with DUI with other charges pending. The driver was found guilty of two counts of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to two ten year sentences with all but six years suspended. In 2003 after serving just 3 years and 2 months of his sentence the driver of that vehicle was able to go home to his wife and kids, Sgt Platt and Officer McCarthy’s kids are still waiting to meet their dad’s, for them it will be a lifetime.

Sergeant Platt had been employed with the Baltimore City Police Department for 17 years, and is survived by his wife, 3-year-old daughter, and 4-year-old son.

Officer McCarthy had been employed with the Baltimore City Police Department for 15 years, and is survived by his 9-year-old daughter.

The Sun paper had a lot to say about the funeral of these two fine officers, as they reported the following:

So the deaths of two police officers remind us not only of their vulnerability, but our own. And when Mayor O'Malley offered his tender words of comfort, it took some of us back seven years, to another funeral, another slain policeman, and the randomness of life and death.

This Officer’s name was Herman Jones. He was a 23-year veteran in a job in which every day is a roll of the dice. But the irony of his death, like Platt's and McCarthy's, was that it could have happened to anybody. Jones had gone to an East Baltimore carryout for an evening snack, where a teen-age kid who should have been home studying arithmetic pulled out a gun and shot him.

And on a summer morning at the Little Ark Missionary Baptist Church, they laid Herman Jones' body in an open casket for everyone to see, Herman Jones' wife Linda and his children were nearby, as a choir sang so hauntingly that it tore everybody in the place up with tears.

Take my hand,

Precious Lord,

Lead me home.

And the mayor of Baltimore was there that day. They saved a front- row seat for Kurt L. Schmoke directly in front of Herman Jones' casket, and the mayor looked at poor Jones, and he heard the choir chanting its refrain, and you knew that something special was coming from Schmoke. The mayor was so much like Jones. They were kids who'd grown up in post-war America, each a product of the great civil rights movement, each a graduate of Baltimore City College, each a football player for the legendary coach, George Young. This one would come from Schmoke's heart.

But nothing came

By the time the mayor reached the pulpit, he'd had time to think about the killing in his city, and he'd had time to absorb the emotional singing, and all of the church's mourners with their grief coming out of their pores, and there was nothing he could summon.

He muttered a few platitudes about the awfulness of killing, and the need for some national sense of urgency, and in a few moments he was done. Whatever passion he felt, he kept it to himself, and there were people who walked out of the Little Ark Missionary Baptist Church that morning feeling they had been cheated.

Last week, the new mayor of Baltimore spoke quite beautifully. He calls the funerals of police officers the toughest part of his job. But the job is still new for Martin O'Malley. It has been his for less than a year. By the time of Herman Jones' funeral, Kurt L. Schmoke was five years into the job, and maybe 1,500 killings into it, and some of those killed were police officers of his city.

As their brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let them be forgotten. Their service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may they rest in peace, and may God always bless them.

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HENRY M MICKEY
64-W: 6
End of Watch: March 24, 1970
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. It was 10 of 11 on March 23rd 1970 when Officers Henry M. Mickey, Vincent Cole, and Victor Dennis made their way to the rear of a row house in the 1800 Block of while Pennsylvania Ave. The three took care not to alert the man they had come to arrest. Armed with arrest, and search warrants they climbed the stairs to the second floor apartment of James Stewart, this apartment was located above the Pennsylvania Ave. shoe store. Due to the tight stairway, and configuration of the hallway, officers were forced to stand in front of the door as they announced their presence. Steward a violent man always had a firearm within reach, when he heard the officers he grabbed a rifle, opened the door and from the light in his apartment glowing into the hallway he saw Officer Mickey, he dropped his rifle’s front sight onto Officer Mickey, and fired a single shot, that shot struck the Officer in the chest killing him instantly. Officers Cole, and Dennis, immediately returned fire with their .38 caliber S&W pistols, dropping Stewart where he stood.  With Stewart dead, Cole and Dennis had to clear the apartment to make sure there were no others that could bring them harm, they found a suspect hiding in the small apartment (Richard Tune) and arrested him.  Officer Mickey was 27 years old and had a wife and a step-son. Officer Mickey had less than one year of service with the department. Before Baltimore he had served with the United States Navy and did several tours in Vietnam - He will not be forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.


Officer Henry Mickey

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RICHARD THOMAS MILLER
17-E: 17
End of Watch: July 21, 1986
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Officer Richard Miller, assigned to the Traffic Division, was busily directing traffic at the west end of the parking lot, prior to a baseball game at Memorial Stadium. Officer Miller, along with others, observed a 1977 Toyota, which was about to drive the wrong way down a one-way street. They attempted to stop the car. The vehicle then swerved towards the officers, traveled a short distance, and ran down Officer Miller, throwing him several feet, and striking two more parked cars. The driver of the 1977 Toyota was arrested and charged with murder and three counts of attempted murder. Officers quickly administered first aid to Officer Miller while an ambulance was summoned. He was taken to University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Unit. For several weeks he fought to live. Medical staff at the Shock Trauma Unit performed several operations to repair massive internal injuries. On July 21, 1986, Officer Miller succumbed to his injuries, one day away from his 32nd anniversary of service with the department. On this day 1986 we lost our Police Officer Richard Thomas Miller to a vehicular assault as he was run down while on duty based on the following:
 

Officer Richard Miller, assigned to the Traffic Division, was busily directing traffic at the west end of the parking lot, prior to a baseball game at Memorial Stadium. Officer Miller, along with others, observed a 1977 Toyota, which was about to drive the wrong way down a one-way street. They attempted to stop the car. The vehicle then swerved towards the officers, traveled a short distance, and ran down Officer Miller, throwing him several feet, and striking two more parked cars. The driver of the 1977 Toyota was arrested and charged with murder and three counts of attempted murder. Officers quickly administered first aid to Officer Miller while an ambulance was summoned. He was taken to University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Unit. For several weeks he fought to live. Medical staff at the Shock Trauma Unit performed several operations to repair massive internal injuries. On July 21, 1986, Officer Miller succumbed to his injuries, one day away from his 32nd anniversary of service with the department.
 

Leonard P. Cirincione, 40, was convicted in 1987 of first-degree murder and related charges in the 1986 slaying of Officer Richard Miller, who was run down while directing traffic outside Memorial Stadium before an Orioles game. Cirincione is serving a sentence of life plus 20 years. Miller survived for 5 1/2 weeks on life support. He died on July 21, 1986 - Cirincione, a drug abuser since high school, testified he had smoked up to eight PCP cigarettes within 12 hours of the incident and that he blacked out shortly before hitting Miller. In 1996 he began asking for a new trial, a reduced sentence.. he is a new man, since his arrest he has turned his life around 360 degrees.. the judge told him to pound sand… you did the crime do the time… New trial denied for killer of city police officer
 

He will forever be missed, but never forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.. God Bless and Rest in Peace.


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ROY L MITCHELL
5-W: 1
End of Watch: November 1, 1925
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

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ROLAND WALLACE MORGAN
19-W: 3
End of Watch: January 6, 1951
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1951 we lost our brother Officer Ronald W. Morgan - Officer Morgan was struck and killed while getting out of his patrol car on the night of January 6, 1951 to use a call box for his hourly call-in at 11 p.m. call. Investigation showed that he was struck by a car driven by John Caskie, Jr. Caskie was arrested at a nightclub several hours later, and was charged with manslaughter, driving under the influence and failure to stop after an accident. Officer Morgan was married and the father of three children. he served with the department for 6 years having been appointed on 5 Sept 44.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police department will not let him be forgotten, as we take this time to remember him and thank him for his service and sacrifice.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police department will not let him be forgotten, as we take this time to remember him and thank him for his service and sacrifice.


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JAMES MURPHY
37-E: 4
End of Watch: July 5, 1870
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1870 we lost our brother Police  Officer James Murphy to an assault based on the following:
About 3 o’clock, the afternoon of the fourth of July the attention of Policeman James Murphy, while passing through the Lexington Market, was attracted to three young men, brothers, named James, John, and David Duering, who were acting in a riotous manner. The officer demonstrated with them and told them if they did not behave themselves he would take them to the station house. James Duering commenced verbally abusing the Policeman and the latter took him into custody. The brothers told James not to go to the station house. James resisted, when the two brothers came up, and one of them struck the officer upon his head with his fist as hard as he could. Officer Murphy pulled out his Billy, but in the scuffle that ensued he lost it. James succeeded in getting away and all three ran up Paca Street. The officer followed and again succeeded in taking James into custody when the other brothers came around from behind and struck the officer with Billies.

Policeman Murphy, however, succeeded in holding onto his prisoner and Policeman Mantle coming up he chased David and caught him hiding in an outhouse in the rear of Paca Street. Policeman Engle afterwards arrested John at his mother’s house on Orchard Street.

They were all taken to the Western Station House and arraigned for the charge of assaulting the officer.   They were all released upon giving bail, the policeman at the time not appearing to be severely injured. Soon after the release of the accused, Officer Murphy was taken with convulsions in the yard of the Station House. Help was summoned but the officer continued to grow worse. A priest was called in to administer the last rite of the Catholic Church. Murphy lingered in convulsions until about half past one o’clock on this morning (5 July, 1870) when he expired, having remained unconscious up to the time of his death. Warrants were at once issued for the re-arrest of the Duering brothers and all three were arrested.

Murphy was single and 23 years of age. He was appointed to the force on the 4th of April last .

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless, and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Murphy.


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MICHAEL NEARY
31-E: 8
End of Watch: June 20, 1894
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 20 June 1894, we lost our brother's Policeman Michael Neary and Policeman James T. Dunn of the Central District as they were both instantly killed at 8:25 p.m. They were struck by a locomotive of the Northern Central Railway at the bridge between Chase and Eager Streets. Policeman Neary’s head was severed from his body and the two parts were picked up separately. Policeman Dunn was hit on the right side of the head. His skull was fractured in several places and his body was knocked from the railroad bridge into Jones’s Falls. The two bodies were recovered immediately after the accident by Captain Frank Toner of the Central District and were carried into Calvert Station on a private car furnished by the railway company and from here were taken to the City Hospital. The accident occurred while the policemen were attempting to arrest a number of boys who were bathing in Jones’s Falls. Boys have been accustomed to take off their clothes and get into the waters of the Falls at this point almost daily. Their antics in the water caused many of the people who live in the neighborhood to become indignant. Complaint was made to the police and an effort was being made to break up the practice. About an hour and a half before the accident happened Policeman Dunn had arrested one boy and sent him to the station house. Returning to his beat he saw other boys in the water and set about capturing them. Policeman Neary was off duty at the time and at his home on Guilford Avenue in citizen’s dress. Appreciating the difficulty that Dunn would have in arresting the boys or restraining them if caught, he put on his coat and went to Dunn’s assistance. The two officers crossed to the east side of Chase Street bridge and descended the high bank to the railroad tracks. They walked over the railroad and getting close to the boys called to them to come out of the water. Captain Toner was an interested spectator of the scene and remained to see how the officers would capture the boys. A large crowd had also collected on the street above. Two of the boys voluntarily came out of the water toward the officers and Captain Toner says that when he saw one boy in Dunn’s charge, he left the bridge and went up Guilford Avenue toward Biddle Street. At that time Neary and Dunn were going up the bank on the west side of the railroad bridge. This was the last the captain saw of his men alive. Soon afterward a large crowd of people gathering on Chase Street bridge hastened back to find out what was the trouble. Then he learned of the fatal accident. After getting up the bank the policemen got on the bridge to walk over to the point where they could get out of the railroad yard onto Chase Street.   The train that struck them was the Parkton accommodation, which had left Union Station on its way into Calvert Station.  It is supposed the policemen did not see or hear the train until it was too late for them to get out of the way.   When the men saw the locomotive upon them, they made a desperate run for life. But it was too late. The fatal blow was struck at the north end of the railroad bridge. Policeman Neary was born in Ireland. He came to Baltimore when sixteen years of age. On October 15, 1877 he was appointed a policeman and patrolled the section between Exeter and Forrest Streets and from Gay to Monument Street. He was a member of A Division and was assigned to day duty. Officer Neary leaves a widow and nine children – six boys and three girls ranging from several months old to nineteen years. Policeman Dunn was six feet tall and weighed 220 pounds. He was thirty-four years old and was born at Long Green, Baltimore County. He was appointed a probationary patrolman December 18, 1890 and was promoted to the regular force May 5, 1891. He was married nearly three years ago and had a baby boy six months old. They are gone but will never be forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department. RIP Brothers and God Bless


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ROBERT K NELSON
5-W: 2
End of Watch: September 19, 1958
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1958, we lost our brother police officer Robert Nelson based on the following;

On 16 Sept 1958, Motors Officer Nelson entered the intersection of Broadway and Gay Streets; at the same time Richard Bishop also entered the intersection causing a collision between the two (Bishop was operating a truck as he just moved to Baltimore from New Jersey). Officer Nelson’s motorcycle was struck so hard that he was ejected from it; airborne, his body was thrown more than 20 feet across the street, causing his head to hit a pole, and curb upon landing. He was immediately taken to St Josephs’ Hospital where doctors worked feverously to try and save his life. His supervisor immediately sent for Officer Nelson’s wife, Emma Nelson. Emma was brought to the hospital from the couples Williams Avenue home. Upon her arrival to the hospital doctors were still working to save her husband’s life; they would eventually have done everything they could, ending by putting a steel plate in his head, they were at a place where all they could do now was to wait. With Emma by his side, three days would pass before Officer Nelson would succumb to his injuries.

Richard Bishop, had only been in Baltimore for two days before he would end the life of our brother with his reckless driving, he was charged with vehicular manslaughter. On 4 October 1958, two magistrates from Baltimore County dealt leniently with the New Jersey man that was involved in the accident that would end the life of Officer Nelson.

Nelson was on the department for a year and half, having served our country in the Korean War 1950-1953. Oddly enough he transferred to motors after hearing of the loss of, Patrolman John Andrews; of the BPD Motors Unit, also struck by a reckless driver nearly a year earlier on Oct 9 1957.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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THOMAS G NEWMAN
27-W: 23
End of Watch: November 23, 2002
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Assigned: Central Investigation Division
Died: November 23, 2002
Length of Service: 12 years

On April 21, 2001, Detective Newman drove his Chevy S-10 pickup into an Amoco gas station in South Baltimore. While there, he encountered four men who began to taunt him. Newman identified himself as a police officer, believing that would diffuse the situation. The men walked away, but not before one of them boldly reached and touched his back to indicate he had a weapon. Detective Newman used his cell phone and called 911 from his vehicle, as he followed the dark red Mazda MPV the men got into. Believing at least one of the men was armed, Newman did no approach them, nor did he want to lose sight of the red Mazda. Newman alerted authorities and gave the 911 operator his location in an attempt to summon sufficient police units. Before police could get to Newman’s location, the men exited their vehicle, all-running in different directions. Unbeknown to Newman, one of the men doubled back and approached the rear of his truck. Newman was on his cellular phone with the 911 dispatcher when the man fired five shots. Newman was wounded as a result of the attack. Despite his injuries, Detective Newman remained committed to the job he loved. Tragically, Detective Thomas G. Newman, a twelve-year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department, was shot and killed on Saturday, November 23, 2002 at approximately 1:50 a.m. He was leaving Joe’s Tavern, located in the 1000 block of Dundalk Avenue. The painful loss of Detective Newman sent shock waves through the police department. The investigation into his murder led to an eerie and devastating conclusion. Detective Newman was ambushed by three men that planned to take his life in retaliation for his testimony in the April 2001 shooting that left him wounded. Investigators learned one of the suspects responsible for Newman’s murder was the half-brother of the suspect who was convicted and imprisoned for the attempted murder of Detective Newman in April of 2001. Detective Newman is survived by his son, daughter, mother, sisters, brother, nieces and nephews. Detective Newman was a key part of his family unit; his strength and love are a painful loss. His death has also saddened his squad members in the Check and Fraud Unit. Sorrowfully, Tommy’s desk is as he left it. His jacket hangs on the back of his chair. Photographs of his children hang on the surrounding wall and slips of phone messages are neatly stacked one on top of the other. From the Baltimore Sun

City officer, 37, shot to death during ambush ; Three men are charged in apparent retaliation for testimony on 2001 attack; `Flat-out execution'; Detective was off duty, leaving bar with girlfriend when gunfire erupted
23 Nov 2002
An off-duty Baltimore police officer was shot and killed early yesterday as he stepped outside a bar in apparent retaliation for testifying against two men convicted of wounding him during an ambush last year.
Detectives, who described the shooting as a "flat-out execution," arrested three men in the killing of Detective Thomas G. Newman, 37, and charged them with first-degree murder.
The death of the 12-year veteran sent waves of fear and anger throughout the city Police Department as officers tried to cope with the brazen attack on an officer who did nothing more than testify against those who had tried to kill him. It is the third incident in eight days in which city officers have been hit by gunfire; five were wounded.
"This has been a really rough stretch for us," Mayor Martin O'Malley said. "This is a horrible loss for the city."
Speaking at a news conference yesterday afternoon, Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris said detectives were "strongly" looking at the link between Newman's death and the previous attack.
Norris declined to discuss specifics of the shooting.
But police said one of the three men in custody was the half- brother of Andre A. Travers, 25, who was convicted of attempted second-degree murder in the near-fatal shooting of Newman in April last year.
Police identified Travers' half-brother as Raymond Saunders, 22, whose last known address was in the 800 block of Fifth Ave. in Halethorpe.
Police sources could not say what role Saunders played in yesterday's shooting. They identified the other two suspects as Jovan J. House, 21, of the 2000 block of Dorton Court and Anthony A. Brown, 34, of the 1000 block of N. Chappel St. All three have been charged with first-degree murder and were being held at the Central Booking and Intake Center last night.
Saunders' other half-brother, Larry Travers, 27, said last night that Saunders has been accused of a crime he did not commit. "That just doesn't sound like my brother," Larry Travers said. "He doesn't have that type of mentality."
Saunders, Brown and House have been convicted of minor drug offenses, court records show. It does not appear that they had been charged with any violent crimes before yesterday's shooting.
Police sources said that Saunders spotted Newman in Joe's Tavern in the 1000 block of Dundalk Ave. in Southeast Baltimore - one of the officer's favorite hangouts. Saunders then went to find friends, police sources said.
As Newman left the bar with a girlfriend about 1:50 a.m., two men approached him and opened fire without uttering a word, police said.
Newman fell to the ground, police said, and the gunmen stood over his body, aimed and continued to shoot.
Three bullets struck the officer's chest, and at least one was found lodged in his heart, Norris said. The girlfriend was not injured, and police declined to provide more details.
Norris, who had visited Newman in the hospital after the officer was wounded last year, said he was allowed to see Newman's body early yesterday.
"That confirmed my worst fears," Norris said. "This is awful. It looked like he had been executed."
After yesterday's shooting, the two men jumped into a waiting car and sped away, police said. A man working as a security guard near the bar watched the shooting, grabbed the officer's gun, jumped into a car and followed the three men, police said.
The security guard fired at the men during the chase but did not hit anyone, police said.
As the fleeing men entered the O'Donnell Heights housing complex, police said, they spotted the security guard, jumped out of their car and scattered.
One of the men was found cowering in a shed, and investigators tracked down the other two men by mid-morning, according to detectives.
Police recovered a 9 mm handgun and a .32-caliber handgun, both used in the shooting of Newman, and obtained tape-recorded statements from the suspects.
"There is no doubt they knew what they were going to do," said one police source close to the investigation. "We have a clear indication that they knew he was a police officer. They knew he was the police officer involved in the other incident."
Gary McLhinney, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, said prosecutors should seek the death penalty because Newman's killing was clearly linked to his law enforcement duties.
"There is no wiggle room here," McLhinney said. "He was killed because he was a cop, and these scum deserve the death penalty."
A spokeswoman for State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said yesterday afternoon that her office could not comment on death penalty deliberations because charges had not been filed at that time.
The shooting was eerily similar to the one Newman barely survived on a dark street in April last year.
About 2:30 a.m. April 21, Newman was off duty and driving south on Baltimore-Washington Parkway when he pulled off to get gasoline and sodas at an Amoco station at Cherry Hill Road and Waterview Avenue.
As he got out of his car, several men began taunting him, and an argument broke out. During the confrontation, one of the men hinted that he had a handgun. Newman told the men that he was a police officer and that he also had a weapon.
The argument seemed to peter out, so Newman went inside the station to buy sodas. But one of the men entered the store and told the off-duty officer that he had guns and knew where to find him.
The incident shook Newman, as he was trying to leave, the men taunted him again from across the street before driving away in a Mazda MPV.
As Newman left the parking lot, he spotted the van. Worried that the men might be dangerous, he called 911 dispatchers to ask for backup and began following the Mazda.
He spotted it about parked at Salerno Place near Norfolk Avenue in the Westport community. Newman had no idea that two men had slipped away from the van and were waiting for him.
A few hundred feet from the Mazda, Newman stopped and was talking to 911 dispatchers when shots rang out. The two men had silently approached Newman, who was hit twice in the back of the neck but managed to scramble out of his car and fire one shot that missed his attackers.
Police said at the time that as many as five men were involved in the shooting, but they were able to identify only two - Travers and Marcellus Henriques, 22. Both were convicted in March of attempted second-degree murder and were sentenced three months later to 30 years in prison.
"He still had the bullets in him" when he testified this year, said Ahmet Hisim, an assistant state's attorney who prosecuted the case. "He was in pain."
After the shooting, Newman impressed many of his colleagues by overcoming his injuries and returning to work.
He was a member of the Warrant Apprehension Task Force, a demanding unit that requires detectives to hunt for dangerous suspects accused of violent crimes. But he did not let the physical labor deter him from returning to the job, said Maj. George Klein, the unit's commander.
"He was a hard worker and conscientious," Klein said. "He almost died the first time he was shot, and he survived it and had a rough recovery. He pushed himself to come back."
The physical and emotional toll of the shooting and his long recovery pushed Newman to seek a less demanding job. He transferred to a small unit that specializes in fraud investigation.
Newman, who lived in Baltimore and has family in Prince George's County, was a frequent customer at Joe's Tavern for about four years. Sometimes, he even acted as a security guard.
Patrons and workers described him as a friendly guy willing to help a friend or offer advice.
"You couldn't find a better person," said Tom Townsend, 59, who runs the package goods section of the bar. "He never drank very much, and he liked to smoke a cigar now and then. I'm telling you, he was a prince."
Newman is survived by a 6-year-old son and a 3-year-old daughter.
Credit: SUN STAFF

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ELMER A NOON
59-E: 9
End of Watch: November 20, 1946
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1946, we lost our brother Police Officer Elmer A. Noon, to a heart attack based on the following: Officer Noon was 41 years old, and died of a heart attack shortly after returning home from work. Elizabeth-Ann used to wait for her dad to get home to tell her how his day went, this was normally achieved by his telling her a police war story, that he would always tone it down for her four year old ears. On this day however, as he came into the house he was visibly ill, not wanting their daughter to see him this way patrolman Noon’s wife Elizabeth bypassed the evening ritual with Elizabeth-Ann and took her husband straight in to bed, then went and called immediately for medical attention By the time The Doctor arrived, Officer Noon had died. The Doctor had determined that the cause of death was a massive heart attack.

His commanders and wife were confused by the cause of death because he had always appeared to be in such good shape, and had not exhibited any of the warning signs, or physical symptoms related to heart attack. The Doctor mentioned the possibility that, “great physical exertion” by even a healthy man, could sometimes result in a heart attack.

Investigators would focus their attention on his last several calls for service before leaving. They quickly honed in one a call he handled at 10 minutes to four, when Officer Noon and his partner, Patrolman Otto Leyhe, 23 car had responded to the intersection of Gay and Forrest Streets, outside of the Belair Market, to help a Special Police Officer, Officer Fred Thomas who was attempting to subdue a Disorderly Drunk. The Drunk Albert Thomas Rogers, on top of being intoxicated, he was large, and he was strong. Citizens stood by watching as the much larger, Rogers, tossed the Special Police Officer around like a rag doll. As Officer Noon and Leyhe pulled up on scene Officer Noon could see the security officer in need of assistance, so before their patrol car could come to a complete stop, Officer Noon had leapt from the passenger seat to the street, and joined in the fight. Patrolman Leyhe had not made it to the tussling officer’s before he saw all Rogers toss Officer Noon aside. It was like two warriors fighting a giant, and the giant was winning, but the warriors were not giving up.

Officer Noon was thrown with such force that he didn’t touch the ground until his body was slammed onto the side of their police vehicle. Stunned a but not unconscious Officer Noon, got up shook it off, showing no fear, he went right back in after Rogers; this time he removed a device from his belt called an “Iron Call” for those that don’t know “The Iron Claw” was mixed of the older “Come Along” (a choke chain device used to latch onto a suspects wrist), and the more modern day, “Police handcuff”. When Officer Noon latched this device onto Roger’s wrist, the fight was not completely over, but it was more controlled by the police than by Rogers. Not long after this (Officer Leyhe estimated to be a 5 to 10 minutes), another officer, patrolman William Ervine, arrived and helped subdue Rogers. It took four officers to control the violent drunk, and get him into the patrol wagon. The wagon driven by patrolman Hue Law, Patrolman Law, would take Rogers to the Northeastern Station House for booking, due to his combative actions an officer would have to ride in the wagon with him; being the second man in a two man car; Officer Noon, was elected for the ride to keep Rogers from escaping, or a assaulting anyone else. The entire trip from the scene to the station house, to the cell-block and to the holding cell was one continuous battle. Still, Officer Noon declined to charge Roger’s with anything other than his initial act of drunk and disorderly. We’ll never know if this was out of compassion for a drunk that didn’t know fully what he was doing, or his being anxious to get home to Elizabeth-Ann and tell her about this, one of his more action packed war stories.

Members of his family waited anxiously for the outcome of the investigation into his death. Concerned for their daughter, sister, Aunt Elisabeth, and granddaughter, niece and cousin Elisabeth-Ann. Because without the determination that it had occurred in the line of duty, and the modest financial benefit that that decision would permit, Elizabeth faced the difficult time of raising their daughter on her own. Fortunately, on January 7, 1947, Raymond Newman was able to pen a letter to the commissioner Hamilton R. Atkinson, praising the department’s decision to consider his brother’s death in the line of duty, in it he wrote, “The decision rendered is a credit to the department, and proves that the men in charge have their interests of those under them at heart.”

Officer Noon was 41 years old, when he died of a heart attack shortly after returning home from work. Just before Officer Noon’s shift ended he went to the assistance of a Special Police Officer in the Belair Market. A man assaulted both officers, and two more that would arrive as back-up. The suspect’s violently resisting caused Officer Noon to be thrown against the side of his radio car, and his eventual heart attack. Officer Noon died two hours after this altercation; he was married and had a four year daughter, it was on this day 1946 (a Wednesday, November 20)

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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THOMAS JOSEPH O'NEILL
14-W: 26
End of Watch: October 16, 1949
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1949 we lost our brother Police Officer Thomas J. O'Neill based on the following:

Officer O'Neill suffered a fatal cerebral hemorrhage after escorting an emergency Polio patient to Sydenham hospital at approx. 10PM. Officer’s O'Neill, Kemmerzell, and Newman, leapfrogged their motors from intersection, to intersection in order to get the patient to the hospital as quickly as possible without interruption. The escorted ambulance carrying the Polio patient to the hospital made it their safely, and in record time without incident. After the ambulance arrived at the hospital, the officers left to return to their posts. Officer O'Neill had trouble starting his bike (in 1949 they didn’t have electric starters, he had to kick-start his bike) , he managed to catch up to the others an told them about his bike troubles and then made his way back over to his post near Lake Montebello. There can be a lot of stress in police work, often causing high blood pressure, and heart trouble from the fast paced lifestyle we as police have to live. In O'Neill case his body was found face down in the parking lot by a doctor, who realized he had an emergency medical condition so he rushed him into the ER where doctors determine that his medical condition was more serious than they were equipped to handle so they arranged for him to be escorted from Sydenham to Mercy Hospital.

A combination of factors, including the stress of the escort and the effort made to restart his motorcycle, induced a fatal cerebral hemorrhage. Doctors worked for hours to save the Officer O’Neill’s life, but at 6:45 AM on October the 16th 1949 Officer O'Neill died. Investigation reviled his death was duty related, and so his wife Helen was awarded his LOD pension.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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CARL PETERSON JR
14-W: 5
End of Watch: June 12, 1971
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Homicide Report CC# 1F26972 Submitted to the Deputy Commissioner, Operations Bureau 

On 12 June 1971 about 2155 hours, in front of Pine Street Station, Officer Bruce Green, operating 128 car, received information from Gwendolyn Jeanette Carter, 17 years, that a man was holding her mother, Mrs. Katherine White and her daughter Leisa Carter, age 2 ½, at gun point, at 250 Pearl Street. The officer proceeded south on Pine Street to Lexington Street and East on Lexington to Pearl Street. At this point, he was approached by Alvin Lee Gill who reported that an officer had been shot on the corner at Lexington and Pearl Street. Officer Green observed Officer Carl Peterson lying on the sidewalk at that location. He observed that the officer’s revolver was missing and the officer was bleeding from the left side of the face. Municipal Ambulance #1 responded to the scene and removed Officer Peterson to University Hospital. Officer Peterson was treated for a gunshot wound of the head and died as a result of this wound at 2345 hours on June 12, 1971. Pronounced dead by Dr. Daniel Cook of the neurological staff. Officer Kenneth Burke assigned to Unit 122 received a call from Communications at 2155 hours, 12 June 1971, to 239 N. Pearl Street, for a man with a gun and a two year old hostage on the second floor. Officer Arnold Adams, Unit 112 responded to the scene as a back-up unit. On arrival at 239 N. Pearl Street, the officers were advised that a person had kicked on the front door and entered the house. This person was carrying a baby in one hand and a revolver in the other hand. Officer Adams removed the department shotgun from 112 car in the company with Officer Burke proceeded to the house. The officers heard footsteps on the second floor and made their way up the staircase. They commanded the person in the room to show himself with his hands stretched out. The person in the room came out and identified himself and advised them that the person they wanted was on the third floor. The officers proceeded to the third floor calling commands to release the girl and come out with his hands up. The officers then went to the third floor and Officer Adams kicked in the door. At this point he observed the suspect standing to the left of the door and the 2 ½ year old girl just to his right. The suspect pointed the revolver at Officer Adam’s face. He stepped back and pointed the shotgun around the door. The suspect grabbed the barrel of the shotgun. Officer Adams did not fire for fear of hitting the child. A struggle then ensued for the shotgun. The suspect then released it and pointed the fun he was carrying around the door at Officer Burke. Officer Burke grabbed the suspect’s gun hand and pulled his own revolver and fired a shot. Officer Burke then rushed into the room and struggled with the suspect. Officer Adams quickly removed the child from the room then went to Officer Burke’s assistance. The officers attempted to bring him down the stairs. The suspect fell down several steps but was restrained by the officers. Both suspect and officers were treated at Mercy Hospital for injuries received as a result of affecting the arrest. The arrested person was identified as Roland Leroy Jackson of 209 Myrtle Avenue. The revolver taken from Jackson was the service revolver or Officer Carl Peterson. Investigation revealed that Officer Carl Peterson was at the call box at Lexington and Green Streets when a man fitting Jackson’s description knocked him down. The person then removed Officer Peterson’s revolver and shot him above the left eye and fled the scene. Officer Adams and Officer Burke were unaware that a police officer had been shot when taking into custody Roland Jackson. Roland Jackson made a res gestae statement to Officer Anthony Lamartina while being at Mercy Hospital. Jackson blurted out “I don’t know why I did it, I was trying to find myself.” Officer Lamartina immediately advised Jackson of his rights. Jackson again stated “I don’t know why I did it Officer Pete has given my daughter and others’ children in the area candy and other goodies.” Jackson made no further statements.

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JOHN R PHELAN
12-W: 15
End of Watch: September 29, 1956
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1956 we lost our brother Police Officer John R. Phelan due to gunfire based on the following;

The photograph of a rookie who dreamed of nothing more than police work as a career, now hangs in his nephew’s office, it is balanced by the unique patch of the Baltimore Police Department in a custom frame. The picture of the young man, full of life with unquestioned pride in his eyes, makes one contemplate his own mortality. At the end of 21, and with only four months of service protecting the City of Baltimore, Officer Phelan died at the back of an ambulance, the victim of a bullet from his own service weapon. His widow, 19 year old Jacquelyn Phelan, described her late husband’s love for police work as if it were a religion, she spoke of the many times he would rearrange his uniform, and clean his gun until he felt it was perfect. He would also polish the badge he worked so hard to earn. Sadly, the young man was killed before the birth of their first child. The neighborhood in the Northwest District lived in fear, as a gang of armed robbers on a rampage, were robbing small businesses and citizens at will. Officer Phelan bravely patrolled the areas hardest hit by those robberies. In an effort to catch the robbery suspects in the act, several officers hid in the back rooms of liquor stores, and grocery stores and patiently waited for these criminals to strike. Patrolman Wilbert J Schroeder hid in the rear of the Park’s Liquor Store in the 2700 Block of West North Avenue. Late on the evening of September 29, 1959, three men burst through the front door the liquor store brandishing handguns; they began shouting orders to the store owner William Park and his two employees, Gilmor Donte and James Curtis. On emerging from his hiding space, Patrolman Schroeder was met with a barrage of gunfire from less than 10 feet away, bullets flew, shattering bottles and cases of beer, but, amazingly, not a single person was struck, and the three robbers fled to the street. Officer Schroeder close behind, took aim at the largest member of the group and let his final round fly. It struck Alvin Herbert Braxton, a 6 foot, 210 lb. seventeen-year-old in his leg as he ran. The shot stopped Alvin Braxton in his tracks. With news a gun battle spreading fast, requests for assistance were quickly answered. Among those who responded were Patrolman Phelan and his partner, Patrolman Theodore Weintraub. With the scene secure, the officers sent for an ambulance to care off the young criminals for treatment to his leg wound. Medics, Walter Robinson and Mark Rohm arrived shortly afterward and loaded the critically injured man into their ambulance. In the mid 1950s, handcuffs, and leg irons were a luxury item. Often those patrolman who had them had spent their own money to acquire them. On this night not a single responding patrolman had a set of handcuffs to restrict the movement of the prisoner. In order to properly guard against escape, Officer Phelan and Weintraub joined the medics in the back of the ambulance for a ride to Lutheran Hospital. Braxton saw an opportunity to escape and began to fight despite the throbbing pain in his leg. The two patrolmen fought back in a desperate struggle within the closed quarters of the ambulance. The medics stopped their vehicle in the intersection of Popular Grove and Baker Street and went to aid of the patrolman. Before Robinson and Rohm could help, Braxton ripped of Officer Phelen’s gun from his holster and began firing wildly. He managed to shoot his way to temporary freedom by fatally wounding Officer Phelan and hitting Weintraub in both legs. The violent youth forced open the doors to the ambulance and assaulted a taxicab driver who was stopped nearby. He then took control of the cab and rammed the rear of the ambulance to keep the patrolman inside. By this time, others were responded to the sounds of gunfire, and frightened calls from citizens. Patrolman Henry Hau was first on the scene upon seeing Braxton Officer Hau took careful aim and shot Braxton four more times. With their ambulance damaged, Robinson and Rohm sped to the hospital in an attempt to save the two patrolmen’s lives. John Phelan died before he would reach the hospital, he would become the youngest officer to lose his life in the service of the city of Baltimore; eventually patrolman Weintraub would recover from his wounds. Patrolman Phillip Buratt and William DePaula, who were driving the patrol wagon, responded to the scene. Still without handcuffs, they transported the wounded Braxton to Lutheran Hospital for much needed care; upon arrival to the hospital Braxton would again attempt an escape, this time he would fight with all his strength despite his extensive injuries, eventually being subdued by an overwhelming number of police who finally handcuffed him. After he had received the necessary care, Braxton revealed the names of his fellow gang members, and where they could be found. Police arrested and charged Alvin Braxton, Roger Ray, Earl Pickett, and Albert Braxton, Alvin’s older brother, they were all charged with more than 11 robberies. The gang had stolen nearly $36,000 and three pistols. Allen Braxton was also tried convicted of murdering Officer John R. Phelan. If anything good could come of such a tragic moment, it was the public’s outcry over the fact that officers were not properly equipped. Newspaper editorials insisted on properly funding and equipping the Baltimore Police Department. One editorial looked upon the idea as a matter of common sense, “Certainly relatively small budget items should not stand in the way of maximum protective equipment for all policemen.” The editor went one to suggest that taxpayers would be far from hostile to inclusion of relatively small sums for general issuance of both handcuffs and new holsters.”

These measures did little to comfort young Jacqueline’s grief at the loss of her new husband, but they did promise that in the future, officers would have the added measure of safety that many officers today take for granted.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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JOHN DAVID PLATT
60-W: 22
End of Watch: October 14, 2000
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 2000, we lost our brothers, Sergeant Platt and Officer Kevin McCarthy who were killed when their patrol car as it was broadsided in that Hamilton intersection by a drunk driver. The two officers were on routine patrol in a residential area when the driver of a full size pickup truck failed to obey a stop sign causing the collision.

The impact caused the officer’s patrol car to flip over and strike a utility pole. Both officers were killed instantly. Neither occupant of the pickup truck was injured. The driver of the vehicle was charged with DUI with other charges pending. The driver was found guilty of two counts of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to two ten year sentences with all but six years suspended. In 2003 after serving just 3 years and 2 months of his sentence the driver of that vehicle was able to go home to his wife and kids, Sgt Platt and Officer McCarthy’s kids are still waiting to meet their dad’s, for them it will be a lifetime.

Sergeant Platt had been employed with the Baltimore City Police Department for 17 years, and is survived by his wife, 3-year-old daughter, and 4-year-old son.

Officer McCarthy had been employed with the Baltimore City Police Department for 15 years, and is survived by his 9-year-old daughter.

The Sun paper had a lot to say about the funeral of these two fine officers, as they reported the following:

So the deaths of two police officers remind us not only of their vulnerability, but our own. And when Mayor O'Malley offered his tender words of comfort, it took some of us back seven years, to another funeral, another slain policeman, and the randomness of life and death.

This Officer’s name was Herman Jones. He was a 23-year veteran in a job in which every day is a roll of the dice. But the irony of his death, like Platt's and McCarthy's, was that it could have happened to anybody. Jones had gone to an East Baltimore carryout for an evening snack, where a teen-age kid who should have been home studying arithmetic pulled out a gun and shot him.

And on a summer morning at the Little Ark Missionary Baptist Church, they laid Herman Jones' body in an open casket for everyone to see, Herman Jones' wife Linda and his children were nearby, as a choir sang so hauntingly that it tore everybody in the place up with tears.

Take my hand,
Precious Lord,

Lead me home
.

And the mayor of Baltimore was there that day. They saved a front- row seat for Kurt L. Schmoke directly in front of Herman Jones' casket, and the mayor looked at poor Jones, and he heard the choir chanting its refrain, and you knew that something special was coming from Schmoke. The mayor was so much like Jones. They were kids who'd grown up in post-war America, each a product of the great civil rights movement, each a graduate of Baltimore City College, each a football player for the legendary coach, George Young. This one would come from Schmoke's heart.

But nothing came.

By the time the mayor reached the pulpit, he'd had time to think about the killing in his city, and he'd had time to absorb the emotional singing, and all of the church's mourners with their grief coming out of their pores, and there was nothing he could summon.

He muttered a few platitudes about the awfulness of killing, and the need for some national sense of urgency, and in a few moments he was done. Whatever passion he felt, he kept it to himself, and there were people who walked out of the Little Ark Missionary Baptist Church that morning feeling they had been cheated.

Last week, the new mayor of Baltimore spoke quite beautifully. He calls the funerals of police officers the toughest part of his job. But the job is still new for Martin O'Malley. It has been his for less than a year. By the time of Herman Jones' funeral, Kurt L. Schmoke was five years into the job, and maybe 1,500 killings into it, and some of those killed were police officers of his city.

As their brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let them be forgotten. Their service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may they rest in peace, and may God always bless them.


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THOMAS RUSSELL PORTZ JR
51-E: 27
End of Watch: October 20, 2010
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 2010 we lost our brother Police Officer Thomas Portz Jr to an auto accident based on the following:

Police Officer Tommy Portz was killed in an automobile accident when his patrol car struck the back of a stopped firetruck on a highway. The firetruck had responded to reports of an injured person lying in the highway median strip and had stopped in the left lane to investigate.

Officer Portz's patrol car collided with the back of the stopped truck at a high rate of speed, causing fatal injuries.

Officer Portz had served with the Baltimore Police Department for nearly 10 years. He is survived by his wife and three children.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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CLAUDE J PROFILI
1-W: 17
End of Watch: February 6, 1964
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Appointed: January17, 1952
Assigned: Western District
Died: February 6, 1964
Length of Service: 12 years, 1 month
Officer Profili responded to a hold-up alarm at the Maryland National Bank at 520 Franklintown. Upon his arrival he walked up to the bank where he saw two suspects robbing the bank. He withdrew his weapon and began to give orders to them. A third suspect he did not see, shot him in the head with a .45 caliber pistol. Officer Profili was married and the father of two children. The suspects were apprehended. Officer Profili served in the U.S. Navy from March 20, 1946 to January 15, 1948.

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JAMES J PURCELL
6-W: 12
End of Watch: October 24, 1955
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1955, we lost our brother Sergeant James Purcell to gunfire based on the following;

Sergeant Purnell was shot twice with his own service revolver on a Sunday morning 23 Oct 1955 during a scuffle with, Burglar Ronald A. King, in a house at 134 W. Lanvale street in the Central District. King was killed as he was trying to escape and ran into Officers Leroy Prediger, and Richard Doda. The paroled convict King was still armed with Sgt. Purcell’s service revolver and as such, was fired on by Prediger and Doda. The two Northwest officers were charged with King’s death, but later released to the custody of their Captain, Millard Horton, by Judge Joseph Byrnes following a Habeas Corpus Action. ASA Preston A. Pairo Jr. reported that an investigation had thus failed to show which of the two had fired the shot that caused King's death... in 1955 they didn’t have today’s technology (or apparent common sense, as these officers shouldn’t have been arrested, they should have been awarded a medal) Sergeant Purcell was acting Officer at the time of his death due to an incident that occurred while working the cell block. Commissioner Hepbron forgave him of the cell block incident and obtained the permission of Governor Theodore McKeldin to restored Purcell’s Sergeant powers. During his time as a officer/sergeant Purcell had been awarded several commendations for his hard work and willingness to put the job before himself.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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JOHN RICHARDS
45-W: 24
End of Watch: September 14, 1871
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore City Police History we lost our brother Detective John H. Richards based on the following: On August 31st 1871 at 7:45pm Detective Richards was attempting to question a young man about a stolen satchel. The suspect was seen in front of the store on Franklin Street when Detective Richards called out to him. The suspect suddenly produced a revolver, causing the unarmed Detective Richards to pull out his club and close the distance between the two. One shot was fired by the suspect, striking Detective Richards' arm a second was fired striking him in his upper chest. Those in the area heard two shots from a small pistol, which had resulted in seriously wounding Detective John Richards. A group of citizens observed the shooting and started to chase the suspect. The suspect attempted to shoot at the group but the gun misfired.

Witnesses are unsure of the events that followed, some say, after the gun misfired the suspect went to examined the gun to determine the cause of the misfired, he pulled the trigger and accidentally shot himself in the head; Others say he was cornered and once he realized he had no place to go, the subject turned the gun on himself. In either case the suspect died that day from a single shot to the head.

Detective Richards was taken to his home where his condition grew increasingly worse until this date back in 1871 when he succumbed to the wounds he received that day.

Detective Richards was survived by his wife.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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TIMOTHY B RIDENOUR
32-E: 5
End of Watch: October 27, 1975
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On this day in Baltimore Police History 1975 we lost our brother Police Officer Timothy Ridenour to gunfire based on the following: Southwestern District Police Officers Timothy Ridenour and Bernard Harper received a call indicating that a man was running nude in the 4400 Blk. of Old Frederick Road. Arriving on the scene they found the suspect, wearing only a shirt, walking around in a grassy area, which is out of view of the thoroughfare. The man had been placing Christmas decorations on a tree growing in the apartment complex. As the officers approached the man, the suspect bolted past them and sat down on the passenger side of their patrol car. He bounced out again, and ran toward the front steps of his apartment where he apparently began moving a sofa, which had been sitting partly on the grass. As the officers approached he turned and raised his hands in a defensive position, as would a pugilist before a match, he was in a defensive position seemingly ready to ward off the expected blows of his opponent.

Officer Harper explained to the suspect that they were there to help him and not fight or injure him. Officer Harper had already requested back up units. At this point the suspect, who never uttered a word to the officers throughout the entire incident, pointed to Officer Ridenour’s service revolver. Officer Ridenour checked the holster strap, assuring that the weapon was secure. The suspect then reached for the weapon. A scuffle ensued as Officer Harper succeeded in pulling the suspect away from the younger officer who dodged through a hedge in order to obtain a better position. The suspect followed, pouncing on Officer Ridenour, tripping him over a hedge. Frantic efforts were made by Officer Harper to pull the suspect away from the downed officer but his efforts failed. As he recovered from being pushed off of the suspect himself he observed the suspect with Officer Ridenour’s service revolver, firing point blank into his partners head. Back up Officers arrived as the suspect and Officer Harper traded shots. The officers fired several rounds while Officer Harper retrieved a shotgun from his vehicle and approached the suspect who was attempting to reload Officer Ridenour’s weapon with round he was taking from the gun belt of Ridenour’s lifeless body. Demands to drop the revolver were shouted at and ignored by the suspect. Then as the suspect leveled the weapon once again at Officer Harper, a single round was fired from the shotgun. A civilian, who attempted to assist the officers, had been shot once. His condition was listed as “serious.” But stable. The medical staff at Saint Agnes Hospital tried vainly to save the life of Officer Ridenour but it was to no avail. Officer Ridenour died in the hospital’s emergency room at 1706 hours. The 32-year old assailant, who had a history of mental problems, was pronounced dead at the scene of the incident.
As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

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CALVIN M RODWELL
1-W: 2
End of Watch: September 22, 1973
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1973 we lost our brother Patrolman Calvin Rodwell to gunfire based on the following. Like many officers, Patrolman Calvin Rodwell longed to instill a positive image of police officers into the children of Baltimore. To that he sought assignments within the department that allowed him to spend time teaching children, and building a foundation of trust in their young minds. Officer Rodwell's dedication to children went far beyond the normal 8 hour workday. In addition to teaching traffic safety schools at "Safety City" in the Southeast District, he also volunteer as an assistant scoutmaster, at his local scout troop, as well he serves with the big brothers of Baltimore. In his official position, he rarely confronted violent suspects; still he was a hero to so many.

To make ends meet living on the income of an officer in the 70's, Officer Rodwell was forced to moonlight as a taxi driver.( That was not unusual: off-duty officers often worked as cabbies, and the department gave its blessing, because this type work for police was widely publicized and helped decrease the rise of violent crimes against Baltimore cab drivers.) Shortly after midnight on Friday, September 21, 1973, Officer Rodwell picked up a fair at the corner of the McCollah and Wilson street. In Baltimore’s Central district - Louis Walker got in the back of Calvin's cab and requested a trip to Orleans and Asquith Streets. Calvin quickly drove his cab from Central’s west side of Baltimore to the east side, when all of a sudden Walker produced a handgun and forced Officer Rodwell to pull to the curb, Calvin complied and Walker ordered him out of the cab. Once out of the cab Walker drove away, unbeknownst to him, he drove off with more than Officer Rodman's cab and money, the officer's handgun was under cushion of the driver's seat. Rodwell pursued the cab on foot but quickly lost sight of his attacker. Several things Calvin could not have known at that time, things like the odds would be stacked against him that night. The gun used by Walker to rob Rodwell was borrowed; Walker borrowed the gun from another cabbie by the name of Ridgely Young, in fact he was heading back to give the gun back when he decided to rob Rodwell.

Officer Rodwell spotted a cab coming toward him and ran toward it for help. Of all the Cab's in Baltimore, this one was being driven by none other than, Ridgely Young, and as Rodwell neared it he had no way of knowing that Louis Walker, had already met up with Young, and returned his pistol; worse Louis Walker was now waiting in the backseat of Young’s cab, and he found Rodwell’s gun between the cushion of his cab. So as Young was flagged down by Rodwell Louis Walker learned he was more than just a cab driver, he was police, fearing he would be arrested for the robbery Louis Walker would quickly exited Young's cab to confront the now unarmed Officer. Witnesses heard Rodwell plea to Walker for his life seconds before 3 shots were fired by Walker; two of those round struck their target killing Officer Rodwell right there in the street. Officers and medics were dispatch to the scene and would transport the wounded officer to Church Home Hospital, where he was pronounced dead after midnight on the morning of Saturday, 22 September, 1973. Officer Calvin Rodwell touched the lives of many, during his 12 years of service with the Baltimore Police Department. Sadly he would leave behind his Wife Dorsey, and their three children Kimberly, Andre, and the Dino. Shortly after the shooting, Walker was arrested and charged with the murder of this devoted, husband, father, family man and role model.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten. His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Police Department. RIP Officer Calvin Rodwell


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JAMIE ALLEN ROUSSEY
7-W: 22
End of Watch: March 8, 2000
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Information from the “Officer Jamie A. Roussey Memorial Web Page” 22 year-old Police Officer Jamie Roussey, who had been on the job slightly more than a year, died last night of injuries he sustained when his Jeep Cherokee patrol vehicle collided with a car at a West Baltimore intersection. Officer Roussey was responding to help an officer involved in a foot pursuit. As he traveled northbound in the first block of N. Fulton Ave, he collided with a Dodge Neon at the 1700 block of W. Fayette St. The driver’s side of the Jeep hit a utility pole. Officer Roussey was transported to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

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EDGAR J RUMPF
1-E: 11
End of Watch: February 16, 1978
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Smoke was pouring out of the windows of a second floor apartment at 1526 Park Avenue, when alert Central District officers noticed this and called for the Fire Department. Several officers, including Officer Edgar Rumpf, bravely began to go door to door in an effort to alert residents, saving countless lives. Fire apparatus began to arrive and immediately called for others. As quick as it began, the fire required a third alarm. By 1430 hours, the fire was a six alarm blaze. It reached nine alarms before being brought under control. On the Central District radio frequency, officers could be heard checking with each other, assuring the building was being cleared. Then came a call from Officer Edgar Rumpf, one of the two officers assigned to 134 car. He was trapped in an elevator and there was no way to reach him. To their credit, firefighters followed screens of water through the burning building in a vain effort to locate Officer Edgar Rumpf, often greatly risking their own lives. After repeated attempts in which they firefighters found themselves completely encircled by flames, the reality of the situation was clear, there could be no more rescue effort. A roll call was conducted on the radio in the hope that Officer Rumpf might have made it safety, but after several attempts, Officer Rumpf could not be raised. He was found the next morning.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1978 we lost our brother Officer Edgar James Rumpf, Jr. to an apartment fire based on the following;
Officer Edgar James Rumpf, Jr. died in the Beethoven North Apartments fire after leading two children to safety, he was buried by a priest who instructed the hero's family, and fellow policemen about love.
The Rev. Robert C. Callahan, celebrating the mass of Christian burial at Christ the King Catholic Church in Dundalk, derived his eulogy from words of St. Paul.
He said to the mourners:
"Love is patient. Love is kind. Love is not jealous. It does not put on airs. It is not snobbish. It is not rude. It is not self-seeking, nor is it prone to anger, or prone to be injurious." Telling the mourners that, "There are,
No limits to God's Love," Father Callahan added softly of the fallen officer: "Perhaps even the men who knew him well didn’t fully appreciate the depths of his love." After the 33-year-old officer was buried at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, Father Callahan told a reporter:
"I don't like to be long-winded, and I'm capable of that. But I wanted to tell them that because Jimmy sacrificed his life, they all had something to be proud of. He gave up his life for people as an act of perfect love."
Officer Rumpf, was the 81st officer to die in the line of duty. Since 1808, Officer Rumph was the first, according to departmental records, to have died responding to a fire. He radioed headquarters after seeing smoke billow from the Bolton Hill apartment building, his colleagues reported, “He then rushed inside to escort residents from the structure.” The police officer was known to have led two children to safety, then apparently re-entered the Beethoven in search of other tenants.
Officials accounted for all who had been in the building when the fire started but they listed Officer Rumpf as missing. His body was found Thursday morning in the pit of an elevator shaft.
In his eulogy, Father Callahan, 47, made an effort to console the officer's family and the more than 300 police officers in attendance-each perhaps wondering if it could have been his or her funeral instead. Public officials also helped pack the Catholic church in the 300 block Sollers Point road. After the 35-minute mass, acting Governor Lee said be bad been touched by the service, which he termed "so- sad but a beautiful funeral" Mr. Lee said Officer Rumpf, with a reputation for quiet and unspectacular diligence during his seven years on the force, remained an unsung hero until his death. "You never know bow men respond until an act occurs to show heroism,'' be said. "Some men respond and some men don't. This man responded beautifully.'' When Officer Rumpfs body was found, his service revolver was recovered but his badge and cap emblem were missing. They still have not been found. His commander, Maj. Harwood W. Burritt, Jr., of Central District, said at the graveside that Officer Rumpf therefore had to be buried without them, although replicas will be made and delivered to his widow, Judy Ann. Mrs. Rumpf, who entered the church on the arms of a police officer as she clutched a color portrait of her husband, sat quietly during Father Callahan's eulogy.
Her children, Peter C., 4, and Clinton J., 8 months, were not present. At the grave, escorted by her mother, Mrs. Rumpf sat stoically, still holding the portrait, as a city police honor guard stood at attention arid police pallbearers lifted the 175-pound, gray metal casket with silver-colored maple leafs. Mrs. Rumpf sat silently, not crying, responding to Father Callahan's final prayers, alternately looking down into the grave, then gazing up at the canopy over the site, as a bugler sounded taps.
When Major Burritt presented Mrs. Rumpf the flag from her husband’s casket, she kissed it, then acknowledged sentiments whispered to her by Mayor Schaefer and Donald D. Pomerleau, city police commissioner, as both passed by. She offered a smile to Father Callahan. Then Mrs. Rumpf stood, leaned over the casket, kissed it, and walked away. Father Callahan said later that he had been "working on" obtaining an annulment of Mrs. Rumpf's prior marriage and had recently told the couple that he would be able to officiate at a Catholic church wedding for them "within a few months." "We were trying to get it through and then, of course, Jimmy died,'' be said. The priest said the couple had married at Dundalk Methodist Church. He had officiated at Mrs. Rumpf's first marriage, the priest said, as well as at those of her two brothers, and was close to her entire family. The couple bad moved about a month ago into the 1300 block Broening highway, which meant that they should have been parishioners of St. Rita's Church, But
Father Callahan said that when the word came last Thursday that Officer Rurnpf's body had been found in the aftermath of the nine-alarm fire in which 77 tenants lost their homes, he was called in. The priest said that while no decision had been made yet on support of the family, he hoped a combination of city compensation and support from friends would see the family through until Mrs. Rumpf makes decisions about the future.
"She was in the Air Force for a while," he noted. "She has• a very close-knit and very good family. They stick together. I'm sure they'll all be very realistic." Other public officials who attended the funeral were Walter S Orlinsky, City Council president; Hyman A. Pressman, city comptroller, and William A. Swisher, the state's attorney. None spoke at the service. As the coffin ,was transported by hearse from the church through Dundalk and onto• the Beltway, Baltimore county police closed intersections and Beltway access ramps to allow the mile-long funeral procession to move uninterrupted. They controlled traffic, saluting as they stood at attention, as the motorcade passed by slowly.
As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

I was the "motorized" footman for Bolton Hill on this terrible day. I had been dispatched to a call on Chase Street and was heading back to 158 post when I heard Ed on the radio reporting that he found smoke coming out of one of the front 2nd floor apartment windows. He requested the Fire Department to respond. By this time I was coming up the hill on Park Ave. and heard someone come across the radio calling for help. They were coughing and obviously from the sound of their voice, in distress. I knew it was Ed.
When I pulled passed the building there were no fire units on the scene. I saw P/O Richard Sprouse brining out some people, as was a mail carrier. There were flames shooting from the front 2nd floor window and again the radio crackled and in a calmer and softer spoken voice I heard coughing and then the word "help". It was Ed.
P/O Steve Ossmus arrived and we entered the stairs on north side of the building. This was the first time I realized I could hear sirens. We went straight to the second floor and attempted to go through the door but as soon as I grabbed the door handle that led to the hall I had to let go. It was too hot to touch. Steve and I tried to open it but to no avail.
He and I ( as foolish as it was) went to the top floor. We opened the stairwell door and found the hall saturated in smoke. The fire alarm was going off and some people were in the hall. We directed them down the stairs we came up. We yelled, banged on doors, and blew our whistles to get some other people to come out of their apartments. Luckily most people had gone to work and only a few remained.
We were in the stairwell of the 3rd floor when some of the ceiling tiles started melting over our heads. We made it outside to find the Fire Department just hooking up their first line. (It was later learned that the fire units on Mc Mechen St just 5 blocks away had responded to a false alarm pulled by a school kid).
As we made it to the front of the building I was shocked to see how much the fire had spread from the time I had arrived. Steve and I were lucky. What a stupid thing we did! But it was to look for Ed.
I stood in a line with many other officers from Sectors 3 and 5 and watched the building burn. It was surreal. I could only hear the Central District dispatcher doing a Sector by Sector roll call. Not once.... But twice. Both times when they called Ed's unit number.... No response. We all knew Ed was gone.
Several days later the building laid in a huge pile of stone and metal. There was a hook and ladder still putting water on the rubble. There was a crane digging in the area of the elevators. They were looking for Ed.
We watched this for a couple more days until the Fire Chief came into the command post and told Major Burritt that they believed they had located Ed at the base of the elevator shaft. I was still the postman and was directed to go to the excavation with the medics for the purpose of identifying the remains.
The pit was filled with water and debris. Obviously the fire personnel had placed the remains on a ledge of debris. I won't provide any further description out of respect for Ed and his family, but I saw that familiar collar of a reefer. The chain was still attached and there was a partial shoulder patch on the partial coat. No doubt about it... It was Ed.
What came next was totally surprising. As I sat in the command post the Fire
department brought in some articles they found around Ed. Including the portion of the reefer that I had identified. In looking over the coat where our badge is located was a large melted mass. I'm sure it was Ed's badge that melted from the heat. There was a partially burned left handed gun belt. There was a small part of the holster still attached.
Surprised at the articles they brought in, I was shocked to be handed a wet, tightly compressed roll of paper money. The top and bottom of the bills were scorched. I unrolled the top bill and when I laid it out, you could clearly see scorched parallel lines on the bill. Subsequently I unrolled all of the money and had later learned that it was the same amount of money Ed received when he cashed his pay check earlier on that dreadful day.
Fire personnel then brought in another surprise..... a bucket of coins. They reported that the coins were found at the bottom of the pit with Ed. Deputy Battaglia was on the scene and directed me to respond to ECU with the cash and coins. After it was processed, ECU gave it back to me and directed to go to the Commissioner's Office. When I arrived Commissioner Pomerleau looked at the ECU inventory sheet and then he made a call. I heard him tell the person on the other end of the call how much had been inventoried and that he was sending an officer over to see him. He terminated the call and told me to take the money to the Union Trust Bank across from City Hall and that what ever I received from the manager, I was to immediately take it to the Rumph residence and turn it over to Sgt. Joe Richardson who was with Judy and her family. He was Ed's Sergeant.
At the bank I was taken into the manager's office where he gave me two sealed envelopes. One I'm sure was a check in the amount of the inventoried money. When he gave me the other snowball he said.."This is for the family".
I took the envelopes as direct. I met Sgt. Joe at the door and gave them to him. The house was packed with family and blue uniforms. I have no recollection of the drive back to the command post.
For years Judy Rumph would show up at the station on holidays or special events to bring us food, desserts and her inspirational attitude to survive what life give you. She is a remarkable woman.
What a terrible, terrible week. Every year on this anniversary of Ed's death I say a prayer for him and his family. I then give thanks to GOD for seeing Steve and I safely through our search that day.
Over the years I have had many thoughts on this entire incident. The one thing that keeps coming to mind is that being left handed, knowing he was probably going to die, thinking of his family Ed wrapped his recent pay inside the grasp of his left hand and laid on his left side. This last assumption is supported by the fact that the portions of the gun belt and reefer were from the left side.
Rest in Peace Ed.

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WILLIAM L RYAN

12-W: 10
End of Watch: June 13, 1940
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1940 we lost our brother Patrolman William L. Ryan to knife wounds based on the following:

Sun paper reports dated 14 June 1940 titled,
Accused to slayer faces mind test

Man held his attacker of policeman slated for quiz today -
Witnesses say the victim was stabbed to death without warning.
Mental examinations are expected today for Joseph Abata, 37, who was being held for investigation at the Central District police station in connection with the fatal stabbing yesterday Patrolman William L Ryan. A hearing is scheduled for 9 AM tomorrow at which the results of an autopsy, performed yesterday are expected to be disclosed, Ryan, police said, was stabbed several times with a butcher knife as he approached the accused in front of the mission house (Grace and Hope Mission) in the first block of S. Gay St. to investigate a complaint that Abata was brandishing a knife.
SHOTS THIS FUGITIVE

Without a word from Abata, witnesses said, he also was stabbed in the heart. He fired two shots at the flaying man before falling mortally wounded to the ground.
NEITHER SHOT STRUCK THE ASSAILANT

Ryan was pronounced dead at the Mercy hospital. He had been on the force since March 11, 1921. He was 44 years old, his wife Margaret, a son William L Junior 4 and a daughter Patricia Margaret 18 months old survived him.

Abata who was captured by several firemen and citizens, lives in the 1400 block of golf Street he told police that he was born in Sicily, came to this country at the age of four, served in the Army and has a wife and young child somewhere in New York.  

Could Judge O’Dunne have some involvement in this case too, in yesterday’s day in Baltimore Police History 1943, Judge O’Dunne set free a suspect that Killed our Brother William Woodcock, and the news reports dated 1 October 1940 entitled -

“Judge O’Dunne to Help - Speed Criminal Cases - To Devote Next Week to Hearings - Will Try Hollins Market Stall Keepers” It is reported as follows;

As there are more than 500 open cases on the criminal dockets and several important cases are scheduled for trial in the next week, Judge Eugene O'Dunne has consented to devote his time next week to hearing cases in a third Criminal Court. Immediately 134 cases were assigned for trial in the third court, Including seventy-one gambling cases. Next Tuesday, Judge O'Dunne will try a number of Hollins Market stall keepers charged with violating a city ordinance.

It is interesting to note that the report ends by naming other judges slated to help with these trials - Slated for trial in the two regular Sessions of the Criminal Court presided over by Judge Edwin T. Dickerson and George A. Solter arc Neil Grant, former deputy city solicitor, and Albert E. Schmidt, former city cashier, both charged with larceny and embezzlement, .members of the Communist party charged with perjury, and John Joseph Abata, accused of killing a policeman. 

Could it be, could the same Judge that would free a Police Killer four years later in the Woodcock case, free this killer… while the above reports make it appear as though this would be the case, the following reports say, “NO!” Judge Edwin T Dickerson, heard this case and freed this defendant, or at least it would seem as though he was freed, he was sent to Shepard Pratt, and then off to a New York Mental Institution (For the record, I did a little research on nut houses of the 40’s… which while it may sound like a category on Jeopardy, they were no game… more like horror houses. It may have been best for a police Killer to have spent the rest of his life in one of these places. After all our brother did nothing more that answer a call, a call made by concerned citizens, citizens concerned for their safety. Officer Ryan, wanted to make the streets safer, rid them of people like Abata, and he did… Adata was never able to walk the streets or harm anyone again, what follows are the final reports on this case in which it says, “Abata Acquitted in Knife Slaying”. And continues, Man Who Killed Policeman Is Declared Insane and Likely to Remain So - Described as Suffering from Delusions, Believing People Are “Out To Get Him” Reported 9 October 1940; Joseph John Abata, 38, yesterday was acquitted, by reason of insanity of the charge of fatally stabbing patrolman William L Ryan last June 13 at Baltimore and gay Street.

Judge Edwin T Dickerson who rendered the verdict, said he based his conclusion on the testimony of two mental experts who testified that in their opinion Abata was insane at the time of the crime, insane now and likely to remain insane.
TAKEN TO SPRING GROVE

Abata immediately was taken to the Spring Grove state hospital pending efforts to have the defendant placed in a mental institution in New York where Abata was a resident until shortly before the murder. Dr. Manfred S Guttmacher, medical advisor to the supreme bench, said it is customary to put mental patients in an institution in the state where they maintained residence. The stabbing occurred when patrolman Ryan, who was investigating a report of a man who was wielding a knife was attacked and stabbed several times by Abata.
DELUSION DESCRIBED

Patrolman Ryan was unable to defend himself, the attack was so sudden and violent, but he succeeded in drawing his revolver and firing to wild shots afterAbata threw him to the ground. He was pronounced dead shortly afterward.

Dr. Guttmacher and Dr. Arthur a Luttrell assistant superintendent of the Shepherd Pratt Hospital, testified that Abata suffered from delusions and behavior that people were "out to get him" it was because of this delusion that he carried a knife, they said.
SERVED IN THE ARMY

Dr. Guttmacher said the defendant had served several Army enlistments and acted in an orderly manner before the stabbing, when he began to suffer from a mental disorders. He said a bot a believed himself and inventor and thought people were attempting to steal his inventions. Abata was represented by Charles C DiPaola, attorney appointed by the court.

It has been reported above but bears repeating, Our Brother William Ryan was survived by his wife, 4 year old son and 18 month old daughter. He is gone, but will never be forgotten. Killed at a time when his family was only give 1 year salary to bring up those kids, his wife was quite the hero too. God Bless him, and my he Rest in Peace.


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DONALD W SAGER
21-W: 3
End of Watch: April 24, 1970
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Officer Donald W. Sager, assigned to the Central District, was shot and killed on Friday, April 24, 1970, while working in the 1200 block of Myrtle Avenue. In Officer Sager’s car was his partner Officer Stanley Sierakowski, who was shot and seriously wounded. As Officers Sager and Sierakowski were seated in the car, the suspect shot through the back window, striking Officer Sager in the back of the head, killing him instantly. Officer Sierakowski was then shot 5 times with a .45 caliber pistol. The suspect’s sole motivation was to ambush a police officer. The suspect was a militant member of the Black Panther Party. 
Sunpaper Phot taken by Photographer Irving Phillips
25 April 1970 Captioned:  Shell Casings Found
Arrows point to three shell casings found on Myrtle Avenue 
Two police officers were ambushed about 10 o'clock last night by members of the Black Panthers

City policeman shot dead; second wounded officer's body found beside car

Massive search begun in West Baltimore three suspects held, one policeman was killed in the second was critically wounded last night in a shooting in the 1200 block of Myrtle Avenue in West Baltimore. Police identified the victim as Patrolmen Donald W Sager 35 who did with the city police force about 17 years patrolman Stanley Sierakowski 40 with reported in critical condition at Maryland General Hospital. Police said the shooting occurred about 10 PM. Within minutes, more than 40 other policeman and 14 marked and unmarked cars flooded the area seal it off and began an intensive house to house and rooftop search three suspects arrested. Shortly afterward, the rest of three suspects was reported. Police said they found two men hiding under some steps in the vicinity of the shooting. They were taken to central district police station. The third suspect, found in a vacant lot near the scene of the shooting, was taken to Provident Hospital, although he was not reported to be wounded. The Commissioner Donald D Pomerleau and 12 homicide detectives appeared at the scene, and that the two hospitals within a half-hour of the shooting. The police reported that the two patrolman had been called to a home in a 1200 block of Myrtle Avenue to handle a domestic disturbance. Haven't taken care the disturbance. They returned to their car and was then that the gunman or gunmen started shooting at the policeman. Police reported that patrolman Sergio ASCII was found in a gutter between the police car and the sidewalk and patrolman Sager was inside the car. With at least three suspects in custody by midnight, police centered their search around a two block area near the corner of shields place and motor Street, where one patrolman fought a gun duel in an alley with a suspect.

Searchlight is used

The fire department set the truck with a high power searchlight to illuminate the rooms of buildings in the area. At least half of the houses are vacant and the police were breaking into them to search for more suspects. The shooting match between the patrolman and the suspect happened within five minutes of the shooting on Myrtle Avenue and only about a block away. Patrolman Roger Nolan of tactical squad, reported that he was driving in the area when he saw a man running along Fremont Avenue. He had of his car and chased the man into an alley where the suspect turned and fired six jots of them patrolman Nolan returned six shots and gave Chase again, but he said he tripped over some garbage cans and lost a man. Attorney Richard Rosen, the lawyer refused to say it, the three defendants arrested in this shooting were Black Panthers. Sources close to the investigation said the panther party was not implicated in the shooting. The third suspect was arrested shortly before midnight Saturday at the main post office where he is a clerk. He was identified as Marshall E Conway, 24. Police searched his home. The 40 hour block of Argyle Avenue. They said they recovered no weapons all three defendants are charged with murder and as a result, with intent to commit murder in the death the patrolmen Donald Sager and the wounding of patrolman Stanley search Sierakowski, 42 preliminary hearing yesterday for the defendants were postponed until 3 PM today in central immiscible Court. Mr. Rosen, the lawyer for the Black Panthers represented Jack London 25 of the 1700 block of N. Asquith St. at 1 PM session in central Municipal Court lawyer was a company by two men who identified themselves as Black Panthers. The two were not dressed in familiar paramilitary panther garb. Judge Joseph L Broccolino Junior allowed Mr. Rosen and one of the men who identified himself as William P coats of the 1100 block of Cherry Hill Rd. to remain in the hearing, which was closed to all spectators but the press. Mr. Coates said he was the closest friend. He Mr. Johnson has. After several urgent nods for Mr. Coates the defendant accepted. Mr. Rosen as his lawyer, Mr. Rosen then volunteered. I'm not guilty. Although such a plea is not made at a preliminary hearing. Earlier in the day. The other two suspects, Mr. Conway and James Powell 33 of the 1400 block of N. Mount St. appear before Judge Broccolino any in a court session that also was cleared of all spectators but the press. Mr. Conway also is charged with assault with intent to commit murder in the running gun battle with patrolman who had gone to investigate a shooting. Police said that shortly after the 10 PM shooting patrolman Roger Nolan traded pistol shots with a man in a nearby alley patrolman Nolan was not wounded.

Dead on arrival

Patrolman Sager and patrolman service allows key were shot in a hail of bullets as a set and patrol car on a 12 on a block of Myrtle Avenue, where they had gone to investigate a domestic complaint patrolman Sager had a bullet in his brain and right hand was pronounced dead on arrival at Provident Hospital. Patrolman sellers aroused. He was in the air conditioned yesterday at Maryland central hospital with four wounds to the stomach and wounds to both hands


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GEORGE C SAUER
38-E: 1
End of Watch: April 18, 1915
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

SHOT DOWN BY GUNMEN
The Sun (1837 – 1987) April 10, 1915

Page 16

Shot Down by Gunmen
Policeman Sauer Badly Wounded in the Early Morning Battle
Fusillade in Highlandtown

Running Fight Started When New Yorker and Philadelphians Were Ejected From Saloon

Patrolman George C. Sauer, of the Eastern district, was shot in the stomach by gunmen yesterday morning, following a running battle between the gunmen and a gang from Highlandtown, in which more than a dozen shots were fired. Sauer was unconscious for eight hours, and when revived he was found to be two-week to allow any deposition to be taken.

Three hours after the encounter three men had been rounded up on the charge of shooting Sauer, and the confession was obtained from one that he shot Sauer.

The prisoners are:
David Bender, alias Daniel Martell, alias kid Bender, 22 years old, 344 S. 3rd St., New York.
James Miller, alias Slim, alias Harry Martin, 23 years old, 1722 N. 8th St., Philadelphia
Joseph Grose, 25 years old, 2543 Jessop St., Philadelphia.

Bender Admits Shooting
Bender and Miller are directly charged with the shooting. Grose is held as a state's witness. Bender admitted shooting the patrolman. He said he fired at Sauer, thinking he was one of the gang from Highlandtown which a chase them.

Within 30 minutes after Bender and Miller were arraigned on the shooting charge, they were identified by Charles M. Budd, 1314 N. Broadway, as the pair who held him up near his home early Thursday morning, as told exclusively in the son yesterday. A watch bearing the initials “C. M. B.” Led to the summoning of blood to the station. The watch was found in their room at O’Hara’s hotel, N. Liberty St. Bender readily admitted he and Miller held up Mr. Budd.

Sauer was wounded soon after he had gone on duty, at four a. M. He was in Baltimore Street and Milton Avenue when he heard shots beyond the Eastern and of Patterson Park and hail of a passing taxicab, which had just come from Highlandtown, and ordered the chauffeur to take him to the scene.

He stood on the Wanting board as the auto sped East, and Ed Decker Avenue he saw three men run to the corner.

The men fled as a taxi stopped, and soured leaped from the running board in pursuit. They turned into a small alley running east and west from Decker Avenue, and as Sauer ran after them two of the three swung around in their steps and fired. Three shots were fired.

One of the balls and struck Sauer in the stomach, but did not hold him, for he ran forward about 8 feet and seized one of the men. It was only then that he realize he had been shot and, crying for assistance, he pressed down on his prisoner and bore him to the ground, with his knee jammed on the man’s chest. The chauffeur, Larry Purcell, 204 North Pine St. ran to his aid.

Chauffeur Helps Sauer
“Oh, I’m shot! I’m shot; hold him!” Cried Sauer.

Joseph Jasckoliski, a park patrolman, ran from his home to Sauer’s side, but when he saw Purcell helping hold the prisoner he started after the fleeing pair. Then disappeared around the corner of the second alley, and Jasckoliski emptied his pistol to attract other policeman.

Detective Lawrence King, of headquarters, ran from his home nearby a moment later, and also Frank link a former wrestler, 20 North Decker Ave. Then hurried to Sauer, and the policeman was placed in Purcell’s taxi and taken to St. Joseph hospital.

A report of the shooting of Sauer was telephoned to Detective’s headquarters, thence to all the stations, and detectives Hogan and Kahler went to Highlandtown to pick up the lines of the case. They found the Eastern neighborhood for a mile around aroused by the shooting, and there were wild stories of a running gunfight in Highlandtown that preceded Sauer’s wounding and withdrew him to the scene.

This brought them to the club, a saloon at Eighth Street and Lombard Highlandtown, where they learn to the three men had been ejected from the place about 20 minutes before Sauer was shot. Descriptions were obtained, one of which tallied with the man captured by Sauer. This was Grose.

These descriptions were wired around the city to the entire force, and within two hours sergeants Wortman and Kelly and patrolman Sedicum, of the Western district, had arrested Bender and Miller in their room at the O’Hara hotel.

The pair were furious over their arrest, and expressed their regret that they hadn’t finished “the other guy,” Sauer.

They told the sergeants they were lucky the gunmen had not seen them first when they approach their room. Two loaded pistols were found under the pillows of Bender and Miller’s bed and when the two were about to be taken from the patrol to the station a black mask was found on the patrol floor, where one of the pair had dropped it.

Met Grose in City
In effect, Bender statement was that he and Miller met Grose at the Raleigh Hotel at about 8 o’clock Thursday night. Grose was in town was to show of Thurston, the magician. They spent the evening together in the city until about 1 AM when they went to “Scotty” Pugh’s saloon, 1 S. 8th St., Highlandtown.

Shortly after 3 o’clock they left pews and went to the club, next door, where an altercation arose between them and the club employees, and they were hustled into the street. Bender said a mob of nearly 20 men followed them, and a volley of bricks and bottles force hurled at them.

“Benny” Franklin, proprietor of the club, said the three went into the place sometime before 4 o’clock and order drinks.

“I’m looking for ‘Sammy’Harris,” said Bender.

“I can’t give you any drinks,” said the waiter, “you’re under age.” Bender, while heavy – set, has an extremely useful face.

“What’s that?” Cried Bender. “Do you know who I am? I ‘Kid Bender.”

“Well, you can have any drinks, the boss says,” replied the waiter.

“Well, tell your boss to bite his neck,” cried Bender. “Tell him all give him one of these pills.” “He pulled out a 38 caliber at that” said Franklin, “and shoved it under my waiter’s nose. A couple of the other men came up just then and grabbed this Bender and the others and fired them down the steps.”

Stolen Watch in Room
Bender and Miller declared to the police that they had come on from Philadelphia “to look things over on a chance.” A search of the room, where they were arrested, resulted in the finding of Mr. Budd’s watch, and later information was obtained that the two had police records. 22 cartridges were also found in the room. Bender, known to the Philadelphia police as a pickpocket, served time for highway robbery there, while Miller served time for shoplifting.

Patrolman Sauer is 55 years old. He has been on the police force since 1898 and bears an excellent reputation. He has a wife and four children – three daughters and a son.
 

HOPE FOR POLICEMAN
The Sun (1837-1987); Apr 11, 1915;

pg. 11

Hope for Policeman

Sauer, Shot Early Friday, Reported Holding His Own.

His Deposition Not Taken

Bender, One of The Men Held For Shooting, Was Paroled In This City And It Had Just Expired.

Patrolman George C Sauer, of the Eastern district, who was shot in the stomach by gunmen early Friday morning in the Eastern city limits, was reported yesterday to be holding his own at St. Joseph’s hospital.

Dr. Frank C Kirby, of the hospital staff, has expressed the opinion that he may be able to save his life.

One Sauer regained consciousness Friday afternoon an effort was made by Capt. Zellers, of Eastern district, to have Dr. Kirby grant permission to allow a deposition to be gotten from the wounded patrolman, and also to have Sauer identify kid Bender and slim Miller, the gunmen. The surgeon said it would be perilous.

“It would likely excite Sauer,” said Dr. Kirby.

Promises Statement Later
Dr. Kirby however promised that the Capt. that if Sauer should lose strength again and reached the point where he was doomed he would immediately notify the police that the necessary deposition and identification could be obtained

Bender and Miller were put through a strenuous grueling at the Eastern district police station late Friday night by state’s attorney Broening in a move to ascertain the real records of the two. One result was the identification of Bender as paroled prisoner from Judge Elliott’s court. The parole expired last month. The charge was larceny.

The two men showed the result of their growing and their increasing anxiety yesterday when they were taken to headquarters to be “mugged” and Bertillonized. Bender had lost something in his jauntiness. Which amazed everyone Friday.

Sends for His Father
This jauntiness apparently remained with the boy till the states attorneys siege began, and was evidenced in a telegram he sent to his mother. The message read:

“am in trouble; have popped come on as soon as possible. 2nd°. But don’t worry. Here’s a kiss.”

Pending the outcome of patrolman Sauer’s wound, Miller and Bender were arraigned before justice Smith on the charge of attacking and holding up Charles M. Budd, 1314 N. Broadway, Thursday morning, a day previous to the shooting. Budd was seized by the throat by Bender and struck in the face while the other seized his watch and chain and diamond stickpin.

Both Held on $5000 Bail
Bender admitted the charge and the magistrate held each man on $5000 bail on that count.

Both men will be kept in jail without bail on the charge of suiting patrolman Sauer a tentative hearing has come granola mortality get that been set for April 23
 

PATROLMAN SAUER SINKING
The Sun (1837-1987); Apr 12, 1915;

pg. 12

PATROLMAN SAUER SINKING

Police Officer Shot: By Gunman Reported Much Worse

Patrolman George C. Sauer, of the Eastern district, who was shot by gunmen following a running street fight between the gunmen and a Highlandtown gang early Friday morning, developed a

Severe vomiting spell last night and the surgeons feared that he would not live through the night an effort was made to have the two gunmen, Harry Bender and "Slim" Miller, released from jail temporarily that they might be taken before Sauer for identification, but it was found impossible to get the prisoners before this morning. Sauer passed a good night. Saturday and seemed to have gained slightly in strength during the day. Detective C. A. Kahler received a telephone message from Robert D. Cameron chief of detectives of Philadelphia, that Bender is not only wanted there for shooting a man in a poolroom brawl but that he attacked a policeman who interfered, taking from him his pistol after a stiff fight. It is believed that one of the pistols that Bender and his alleged pals used here is that taken from the Philadelphia policeman. Arthur Keller, 21 years old is the Philadelphian Bender is alleged to have shot through the mouth during the brawl in the poolroom. He is in a serious condition in a hospital.

Marshal Carter said he did not expect to deliver Bender to the Philadelphia authorities on warrants that they will bring here today for him on charging that he shot Keller and pocketed the policeman's pistol. "We have obtained a confession from Bender that it was he who fired the shot that wounded Patrolman Sauer and we will try him here as soon as the officer is able to leave the hospital and appear in court against him. It will be the same with the other two men under arrest. We will try them here unless, we find serious charges are being held against them in other cities."

GUNMAN'S SHOT FATAL
The Sun (1837-1987); Apr 19, 1915;

pg. 12

GUNMAN'S SHOT FATAL

Patrolman Sauer Dies Of Wound At St. Joseph's Hospital.

WIFE AND CHILDREN PRESENT

End Comes Suddenly and Officials

Are Too Late To Get Statement

Of'. Attack On Him April 9,

Patrolman George C. Sauer, of the Eastern district, shot by a gunman on 9 April, died last night at St. Joseph's Hospital.

His death came suddenly. A rapid turn for the worse was noticed about 8 o'clock and a hurry call was sent to the police. Captain Zellers, with Sergeant Roche and Justice Smith, hurried to the hospital to obtain Sauer's deposition, but the patrolman had become unconscious in the meantime. He died at 9.30 - Mrs. Sauer and Sauer’s four children, George V. Sauer and Misses Clara A., Regina and Helen C, Sauer, were with their father when he expired. One of the daughters collapsed and was carried from the room. Sauer had a previous sinking "spell last Tuesday and the gunmen, "Kid" Bender and "Slim" Miller, of New York City, together with the· companion of the gunmen, David Grose, New York where hurried to Sauer's bedside for identification. He refused, however to make a dying deposition", declaring stoutly and persistently that he would recover, and it was unnecessary for him to make such a statement.

Shooting was Spectacular
Sauer's shooting was one-of the most spectacular in the department's history. He had been on duty only a few minutes, when at 4:15 in the morning he heard a fusillade of shots, from the Eastern city limits. Sauer "·as then at Patterson Park avenue and Baltimore streets, and he hailed a passing taxicab, standing on the running board ordered the chauffeur, Larry Purcell, to hasten to the location of the shooting.

At Decker Avenue and Baltimore Street he found three men standing on the corner, consulting excitedly... The men darted up Decker avenue as the taxicab slowed up and Sauer leaped to the street and started his pursuit. The trio dodged into a small alley running off from Decker Avenue, and as the patrolman turned into the alley after them one stumbled. Sauer pounced on him, and a moment later one of the other pair turned and fired at the policeman. Sauer fell across the body of the fallen man, but; despite his injury, held on to him. Others were soon attracted to the spot but the fleeing pair escaped. Sauer cried for aid; saying he was shot, and he was hurried to the hospital in a Taxicab.

Two Arrested; Bender Confesses
Two hours later the two fugitives Bender and Miller were arrested in O'Hara's Hotel, North Liberty Street, by Western district officers. Bender confessed to shooting the patrolman and signed a confession to that effect. His explanation was that he, Miller, and Grose had been thrown from the Club Cafe in Highlandtown, following an argument that resulted when Bender was refused service on the ground that he was not of legal age.

A running fight with a Highlandtown gang ensued, and Bender claims he thought Sauer was one of the pursuing gang when he jumped from the taxicab. Bender and Miller will be brought from jail today to await the action of the coroner's jury, which will meet tonight at the Northeastern Police Station. They will be arraigned tomorrow on the charge of murder for no matter what the result of the inquest is, the Police will press this charge against them.
 

PENSION FOR POLICEMAN'S WIDOW
The Sun (1837-1987); Apr 30, 1915;
pg. 9

Pension For patrolman’s widow

The Police Board on Wednesday awarded a pension of $10.a week to the wife of Patrolman George C. Sauer, of the Eastern district, who was shot and killed by an out-of-town gunman on 9 April 1914, Sauer died from the wound at St. Joseph's Hospital. It was on the recommendation of Deputy Marshal Samuel W. House that the pension was Awarded for life to the patrolman's Widow.

TWOS SLAYERS SENTENCED
The Sun (1837-1987); Oct 8, 1915;

pg. 5

Two Slayers Sentenced

Men who killed patrolman Sauer confined for 18 years

Bender’s mother collapses as he and McQuaid are led away to lock up.

David Bender and James McQuaid, whose correct name is said to be Miller, charged with the murder of patrolman George C Sauer, who was shot early on the morning of 9 April 1915, were both convicted of murder in the 2nd°. They were each sentenced to 18 years in the penitentiary, the maximum penalty. The verdict was rendered and the sentences imposed by judge bond of, before whom the case was tried this week without a jury.

“For a while.” The judge said in rendering the verdict. “I was rather of the impression that this murder must be held one of 1st°. I see the difficulty on this point with the state's attorney seems to experience. There is a margin of doubt which in my opinion saves the prisoner from a verdict of murder in the 1st°, but it seems to be a very wide margin. With men of this age I’m especially relieved to find that the verdict of a lesser degree. I find each of the prisoners guilty of murder in the 2nd°.”

Harry B. Wolf, attorney for the defense, called the court’s attention to the fact that his client had been in jail six months awaiting trial.

Sent to the Penitentiary for 18 Years
“I think,” the judge replied, “this is a very sad case. Each prisoner will be sentenced to 18 years in the penitentiary.”

Instantly there was excitement in the courtroom. As Bender and McQuaid were started toward the courtroom lockup, Bender exclaimed: “I want my case taken to the court of appeals.” In reply, judge bond said he had a lawyer he could attend to that.

Bender’s parents, who were in the courtroom, added to the excitement. Mrs. Bender began to scream, and can tinued her lamination until taken outside. There she collapsed. But was revived and went away sobbing. In the lockup Bender raved and threatened, while McQuaid was,.

Bender was the only one of the two who testified. He said that Bender was his correct name. That he belonged in Brooklyn New York and that he was just 18 years old. He is a fat and chubby, with an exceptionally clear complexion and a bushy mass of black hair. McQuaid, or Miller, is about the same age as Bender, but is the opposite and appearance being a lean and lanky. Both have criminal records.

Patrolman in Pursuit one Shot
Patrolman Sauer was shot in an alley north of and parallel to Baltimore Street and East of Hare Street. He died 18 April 1915. The testimony showed that he was chasing the men, who had created a disturbance at a Highlandtown bar. When he was shot. Another man named John Grose, who was with Bender and McQuaid, stumbled and fell as they ran into the alley. The wounded patrolman fell on top of and held him until help arrived.

Bender McQuaid were arrested the same morning in a hotel on N. Liberty St.

Denies assigning confession
Bender denied that he signed a typed written confession that he fired the fatal shot. He also denied Sgt. Kelly’s testimony. He said he and his companions were chased by a gang from Highlandtown, and that he fired at them when they fired at him. Denying that he saw patrolman Sauer, he said he only shot at the men who were shooting at him. Just 24 hours before the shooting Bender and his companion held up Charles Budd on Broadway and robbed him of a scarf pin and a watch.

Grose, who had been held as a witness for the state, was released when the other two were sentenced.


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JAMES L SCHOLL
62-E: 13
End of Watch: August 1, 1953
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day on Baltimore Police History 1953 we lost our brother Sgt. James L. Scholl to gunfire based on the following.
Sgt. Scholl, 41 years old, was shot on July 20, 1953 in a pre-dawn gun battle at an East Baltimore Tavern at 1800 Broening Highway known as “Brown’s Bar” Sgt. Scholl was investigating a call about a suspicious automobile. Another officer was also wounded in the incident. As Sgt. Scholl and the other officer approached the vehicle, they were ambushed by gunfire and drawn into a gun fight. Roger Wylye was charged with the murder of Sgt. Scholl and the other gunman died on scene. Sgt. Scholl died of his injuries on August 1, 1953. He was married and the father of two daughters. Sgt. Scholl joined the department on June 1, 1942.  

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - God Bless and Rest in Peace our brother Sgt. James L. Scholl

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WEBSTER E SCHUMANN
59-E: 9
End of Watch: June 29, 1926
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

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RICHARD D SEEBO
8-E: 5
End of Watch: May 26, 1962
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer Richard D. Seebo Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Saturday, May 26, 1962 Cause: Gunfire

Officer Seebo stopped a vehicle in the 300 Block of E. 20th Street for traffic violations. As he pulled his motorcycle to the rear of the vehicle, the driver put his car in reverse and backed into the officer, throwing him to the ground. Officer Seebo went to the driver’s side window to confront the motorist. When he confronted the driver, the driver withdrew a pistol and shot him in the chest. Officer Seebo fell to the ground and the assailant shot him again in the back as he stood over top of him. Officer Seebo was married and the father of two children. The occupants of the car, Henry Ben Huff, 18, and Wallace Creighton were charged with the murder of the officer. The suspect was later arrested in South Carolina. Officer Seebo served in the U.S. Navy from August 15, 1955 to August 23, 1957.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1962 we lost our brother Police Officer Richard D. Seebo to gunfire based on the following new reports:
Baltimore city police last night (26 May 1962) arrested one of two suspects wanted for questioning in the Saturday night slaying of Patrolman Richard B. Seebo. Only fifteen minutes before, a national alarm for the two had been sent out. The youth picked up for questioning is an l8 year old construction worker who lives in the 800 block Guilford Avenue. He was taken to the Northern District Police Station. The first definite lead in the case came after police questioned four women and two men from mid-afternoon yesterday, until just after 9 O’clock last night. These six who lived in, the 300 block East Twentieth Street, the scene of the shooting gave the officers the names of the two suspects that shot Officer Richard Seebo. 

 

Man Kept in Custody

One of the men questioned yesterday afternoon was kept in custody apparently for additional questioning. As described in the alarm, which went out at 9.15 P.M., both of the suspects are Negro, and one was said to be about 35 and the other 19 or 20. The older man was further described his being brown skinned with a thin build, wooly hair and visibly decayed teeth. The youth was described as being about 6 feet tall, weighing about 175 pounds with dark complexion, rough skin, small goatee and straightened hair.

 

Officer's Pistol Missing 

The youth arrested after the alarm went out was said to answer the description of the younger suspect given in the alarm. The national alarm stated that the wanted pair might be riding in a 1953 or 1954 four door Pontiac Sedan with white top, gray body and an outside sun shield. The two were believed to have a .32·caliber pistol in their possession and possibly Patrolman Seebo's .38·caliber revolver, which was missing. The information provided in the alarm was at variance with that which police had previously received.

It was first reported that the getaway car was a white-and-green 1955 Pontiac with a man and woman in it. May have used Officer's Gun it is suspected that Patrolman Seebo was slain with his own gun. Dr. Rudiger Breitnecker, assistant medical examiner, said the Patrolman had been shot one time-in the right lung and heart by what appeared to have been a .38 caliber gun. Reports varied on how many shots were fired by one of the men in the car. Baltimore police, beginning at 9 A.M. yesterday, started a house-by-house, floor-by-floor check for witnesses in the neighborhood surrounding the 300 block East Twentieth street, where the 27·year-old motorcycle officer was gunned down.  

 

Several persons were questioned

Immediately after the shooting, which occurred shortly after 10 P.M. Saturday, but all were released later. Of the several others questioned yesterday, only one who was picked up at 3.10 P.M. remained in custody. The fullest account of what happened was given to police by Frank Tunstall, 18, of the 400 block East Twentieth. The youth approached Patrolmen John Smith and Harry Bailey who were cruising in the 1900 block Greenmount Avenue, and told them a policeman had just been shot in the 300 block of east Twentieth. The patrolmen found the wounded officer lying on the sidewalk in front of 329 East Twentieth Street. Semi-conscious, Patrolman Seebo was lying on his side, his knees drawn up to his chest and clutched in his arms. 

 

Tried to Render Aid 

Patrolmen Smith and Bailey turned him over and tried to render aid, and then called for more assistance. Patrolman Seebo's pencil was in his right hand, and his traffic book was lying under his right leg. His helmet was off and lying to the left of him, and his motorcycle was lying on its side two doors away at 33l East Twentieth. Young Tunstall told police he saw a car coming north on Barclay street, making a left turn into East Twentieth, its tires screeching during the turn. The mounted patrolman was right behind the car. In front or 329 East Twentieth, the car stopped and the officer pulled up to the right rear bumper. Car Backs Up the car then backed up and knocked the patrolman off his motorcycle, young Tunstall reported. Patrolman Seebo got up, walked over to the car, got the driver out of the car and started talking to him. The driver then got back into his car and started cursing. Ordered out of the car again, the man started to do so, and then a shot was fired, the witness said Patrolman Seebo then tried to pull his gun but the other man apparently took the gun away from him and fired another shot, young Tunstall said. The man then drove west to Guilford Avenue, south to North Avenue, and then cast on North Avenue, when young Tunstall lost sight of the car and went to call police, Patrolman Seebo died either on the scene or on the way to Union Memorial Hospital. He was dead on arrival at the hospital at 10.20 P.M. The patrolman, who lived in Pasadena leaves a wife, Patricia, and two daughters. Patricia Louise, 3, and Phyllis Ann, 8 months. Patrolman Seebo was the second City policeman to be shot to death in less than two months. Patrolman Harry Smith, Jr., was killed April 7, apparently while trying to break up a dice game in the 700 block West Lexington Street. Murder charges have been placed in that case.

While he is no longer with us, we his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. RIP Brother


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CRYSTAL DENEEN SHEFFIELD
14-E: 23
End of Watch: August 22, 2002
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Article in The Thin Blue Line dated 10/04/2002 

On Wednesday, August 21, 2002, Officer Crystal D. Sheffield was responding to the location of Baltimore and Carey Streets to assist an officer requesting extra units. At approximately 11:30 p.m., Officer Sheffield was traveling eastbound on Lafayette Avenue, while operating a marked departmental vehicle when she collided with an unmarked police car, which was traveling south bound on Carey Street, and responding to the same location. After the accident, Officer Sheffield was transported by medics to the University of Maryland’s Shock Trauma Center. Tragically, she would succumb to her injuries on August 22, 2002. As a member of the Baltimore City Police, Officer Sheffield was the first policewoman to be killed in the line of duty.

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EDWARD S SHERMAN
62-E: 14
End of Watch: September 13, 1975
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Funeral services were conducted Wednesday, September 17, 1975 for Southwestern District Officer Edward S. Sherman who died September 13th as the result of a unique and tragic set of circumstances. Officer Sherman, 28, a 5-year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department, was found unconscious in his patrol car by two fellow officers who were on routine patrol. The following excerpts from investigative reports shed light on what caused the officer to succumb to carbon monoxide poisoning. “At about 0710 hours this date, Officer Gary Martin and Officer R. Gooden working 812 car, responded to the rear of Edgewood Elementary School…to try up same. Upon arrival they found 811 car…on the rear lot with the motor running and all the windows rolled up tight…” “The car was butted against a chain link face with a deep undergrowth (of weeds). …After attempting to arouse the officer by beating on the windows…Officer Martin broke the right front window and pulled Officer Sherman from the vehicle. While on the scene Officer Martin checked Officer Sherman’s vital signs and could find none…” Investigation of Officer Sherman’s vehicle revealed that a piece of rubber molding was missing underneath the trunk lid. Combined with the facts that the vehicle was butted against a chain link fence with thick undergrowth, all the windows were up, the engine was left running and the heater was not in use caused the carbon monoxide level to become fatal.

On September 13, 1975 in Baltimore City Police History 1975 we lost our brother Police Officer Edward Sherman based on the following – South Western District’s Officer Edward S. Sherman a 5-year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department, was found unconscious in his patrol car by two fellow officers who were on routine patrol. The following excerpts from investigative reports shed light on what caused the officer to succumb to carbon monoxide poisoning. “At about 0710 hours 09/13/1975, Officers Gary Martin and R. Gooden were working 812 car, responded to the rear of Edgewood Elementary School…to try up same. Upon arrival they found 811 car… it was parked on the rear lot with the motor running and all the windows rolled up tight…” - “The car was butted against a chain link fence with a deep undergrowth (of weeds and grass). …After attempting to wake the officer by beating on the windows…Officer Martin broke the right front window and pulled Officer Sherman from the vehicle. While on the scene Officer Martin checked Officer Sherman’s vitals and finding none he and Godden rendered first aid/CPR” Investigation of Officer Sherman’s vehicle revealed that a thin rubber seal was missing underneath the trunk lid. Combined with the facts that the vehicle was butted against a chain link fence with undergrowth, all the windows were up, the engine running caused the carbon monoxide level to become fatal.
 Investigators felt that due to his working a midnight shift, Officer Sherman would have backed his car up to the curb near a chain link fence to guard against anyone approaching from the rear. At the time 1974/1975 officers were being targeted and attacked by members of the Blackpanthers; we lost many of our brothers to them by ambush… so he may have felt this was his best line if defense against attack. He wouldn’t have known about the thick deep undergrowth of the weeds that were covering his exhaust pipes on the 1974 Plymouth Satellite he was using as his patrol car that night. He would have begun to feel drowsy, but who hasn’t on a midnight shift. He unwittingly became the victim of an odorless poison which would have given him no chance of defeating this silent killer. In most cases people under the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning just feel extra tired and think they are falling asleep, this happens while the carbon monoxide is replacing the oxygen in his body, eventually taking their life. There is only one positive to an ugly and tragic situation such as this, and that is, carbon monoxide poisoning is said to be painless, so we know he didn’t suffer.
 Officer Edward S. Sherman was a 5 year veteran Baltimore police officer, the father of two children, and husband to his beautiful wife. According to the Sun Paper 6 Nov 1975, City Hall offered his widow and now fatherless children, just 25 per cent of his pension pending a Pension Board Hearing to determine whether she should get full benefits. I am not sure of the outcome of that hearing, I can only hope they did the right thing. Because, not only was he our brother, but based on this incident, it was learned that the trunk seal on nearly all of the 1974 Plymouth Satellites in patrol were defective, allowing Carbon Monoxide to enter the vehicles. Many officers during that period were suffering severe headaches, and never knew why until Officer Sherman lost his life due to carbon monoxide poisoning. All of the vehicles were removed from service, inspected and repaired. Officer Sherman lost his life, but his death saved many of his brothers and sisters from serious illness, or death.
 As his brothers and sisters, we will not let him be forgotten. His service honored the city of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department. RIP Officer Edward Sherman and may God bless you and your family on this day.

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HENRY SMITH JR
64-W: 7
End of Watch: April 7, 1962
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer Henry Smith, Jr. Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Saturday, April 7, 1962 Cause: Gunfire

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1962 we lost our brother Police Officer Henry Smith Jr. to gunfire based on the following:
from Sun paper news, 8 April 1962
Two Guarded in Patrolman Slaying Case - Wounded Men Hospital: Police Probe Street Shooting
Two wounded men remained under guard at University Hospital Yesterday as Police investigated the murder of then off-duty Central District Patrolman Henry Smith.
The slain officer, 35 year old Patrolman Henry Smith Jr was the father of five, a five year veteran of the force, was shot to death early 7 April 1962 outside a tavern in the 700 block West Lexington Street.
Police said bullets extracted from the patrolman and the two wounded men will be sent to the crime lab for ballistics examination.

The Service weapons of Officer Smith and the two officers that came to his aid have also been sent to the laboratory, for comparison according to police officials.

Officers believe Patrolman Smith may have been slain with his own weapon. His holster was empty and his revolver was found later in an areaway next to 702 West Fayette Street.  

ONE IN SERIOUS CONDITION

Plainclothes and uniform officers canvased the area throughout the day seeking possible witnesses to the slaying which occurred shortly before 2AM

Police said they have not been able to question the wounded men. One was a 30 year old resident of the 500 Blk. North Freemont Ave. he is listed in serious condition with gunshot wounds. The second 39 year old suspect lives in the 200 Blk. of North Freemont Ave. was shot about five times and was listed in satisfactory condition the hospital said.
Patrolman James Thompson, of the Western District said he was a block away when he heard reports from the gunfire.
Evidence at the scene, based on evidence at the scene police theorized, Officer Smith came up on a dice game outside the saloon and was shot to death when he went to break it up. This was believed because of a stack of bills, and a pair of dice found at the scene.
We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten – RIP Officer Henry Smith and God Bless - Your service "Honored" the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department"  

Follow-up - On 10 April 1962, Police had not found the gun used to kill their brother officer - Patrolman Henry Smith Jr. they had at first felt he may have been killed with his own department issue handgun, as his un had been found after the shooting in the 700 Blk. of West Fayette Street, it had been emptied. Another officer had witnessed the two men standing over Patrolman Smith apparently emptying a gun into his body. That officer emptied his revolver into the two men.


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MILTON I SPELL
17-E: 2
End of Watch: August 15, 1974
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On the night of August 15, 1974, in the 1600 block of North Bradford Street just before 9:30 p.m., Officer Milton Spell parked his car to begin foot patrol. Officer Spell’s attention was drawn to a vehicle that was weaving side to side traveling in the same block. Feeling that the driver may be intoxicated, he notified the dispatcher that he was attempting to stop the vehicle to investigate the driver. Following normal procedures, he requested a backup unit and continued to approach the vehicle. Moments before the backup unit arrived, while Officer Spell was speaking to the driver, shots rang out from inside the suspect’s vehicle, striking Officer Spell. Officer Spell fell to the street with chest and abdomen wounds. The suspect and a companion fled the scene. Officer Louis W. Michelberger was a little more than a block away when he heard the shots fired. He arrived to find more than 200 people standing near the fallen officer. Officer Michelberger attempted to save Officer Spell’s life using CPR. Officer Spell was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital where he died, undergoing emergency treatment. Officer Spell was a member of the Baltimore Police Department since 1967, he was 27 years old at the time of his death.

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JOHN A STAPF
62-E: 5
End of Watch: November 2, 1934
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1934, we lost our brother Police Officer John A. Stapf to a trolley accident based on the following;

Having completed his tour of duty, and waiting at the North Ave. callbox over the Western Maryland Railway Bridge with his side partners Officer John Schmidt, and Edward Burns the awaited their reliefs. Once the other’s arrived, the trio parted ways;

Their trolley had pulled up and was standing as Schmidt, and Burns boarded same. Patrolman Stapf, rounded their trolley in an attempt to ready himself for the boarding of his westbound trolley, (Officer Staph lived at 5102 Elmer Avenue.) In his haste to get home to his family he quickly rounded their trolley and crossed over and onto the westbound trolley’s tracks where he was struck by said trolley. He was hit so hard that he was thrown into the air, and back into the of the eastbound trolley where he landed close to his partners Schmidt and Burns who later reported to the Department that Stapf’s injuries we so bad, his chances for survival were grim; still he was transported to West Baltimore General Hospital where he died due to a severe skull fracture.

Officer John A Staff, was 63 years old at the time of his death; he had served as the citizens of Baltimore for nearly 34 years, receiving numerous awards, commendations and citations. He was survived by his wife Katherine and sons George, William, John and Garland along with his daughters Lillian, Margaret, and Florence.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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THOMAS F STEINACKER
16-W: 14
End of Watch: September 29, 1932
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day In Baltimore Police History 1932 we lost our brother Officer Stienacker to an auto accident based on the following.
On September 29, 1932 at 9:50 a.m., Officer Stienacker was crossing the intersection of Frederick Avenue and Willard Street. A motorist struck Officer Steinacker as he crossed Frederick Avenue. As a result, he was thrown against a United Railway and Electric Company street car. He suffered a fractured skull, lacerated head and ear. He succumbed to his injuries on October 4, 1932.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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FRANCIS R STRANSKY
28-E: 15
End of Watch: January 10, 1964
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Appointed: January 5, 1959
Assigned: Central District
Died: January 10, 1964
Length of Service: 5 years
Officer Francis Stransky made an arrest at the Belair Market – Cicero’s and had a heart attack. Officer Stransky, who was 39 years old, became involved in an altercation in the 500 Block of Ensor Street on January 10, 1964. The officer subdued his assailant and took him to the Central District. Approximately an hour after the altercation while he was booking his prisoner, Officer Stransky suffered a heart attack and died. Larry G. Wadsworth, 22 was charged with the officer’s death. Officer Stransky was married and the father of two children.
On this day in Baltimore Police History 1964 we lost our brother Officer Francis Stransky to injury/illness based on the following:
1964 would become one of the most violent years in the History of the Baltimore Police Department. By year’s end five officer’s lives would end in the line of duty, and this day 1964 would be that day that kicked them all off, it we would be the day we would lose the first of those five officers.

Officer Stransky was a five year veteran, he was an aggressive officer, that worked his beat, knew everyone and did his job by the book. It was coming up on 6 o’Clock maybe quarter of, when Officer Stransky was in the 500 block of Ensor St, and came across a 22 year old wise guy by the name of Larry G. Wadsworth. Wadsworth was acting disorderly and refused to cease his actions and move on, when told he was being placed under arrest he felt it was up to him to resist that arrest and that the officer wouldn’t be able to subdue him. What he didn’t know was Stransky knew the laws, and he knew the rules, rules he followed to the letter, so he tried to subdue Wadsworth, and found he was no match, so he followed the progression and went from hand-to-hand the introduction of his Espantoon, and after a few jabs, and a few strikes from the stick Wadsworth tapped out, he was ready to stop by Mercy hospital on the way to Men’s detention. That’s just what happened, he was taken to Mercy where he was treated for his lumps, they finished up there and the two men walked down the street to the Central District Police Station for the prisoner can be booked on disorderly, assault, and resisting arrest charges. While Wadsworth was waiting in one of the holding cell, Stransky was in the roll call room, where he began feeling odd, before he could call for help he would collapse to the floor. Officer Stransky had died before anyone really fully understood what was happening with him.

22-year-old Wadsworth came in on what would have been minor charges. But before he knew what was going on the fight he decided to put up against the arrest and against the officer would have him catching another charge, but worse than the charge it would make him a murderer. Because in addition to a simple disturbance, and resisting charges Wadsworth was now being charged with the assault and the manslaughter charge for causing the patrolman’s death.

Behind Stransky’s death we would see four more fallen officers be the year would end those would be officers Claude Profili, Walter Matthys, Teddy-l-Brafford, and Sgt. Jack Cooper. From an officer with less than a week on the streets, to an officer with 17-years on the street, each was a man of valor, each was loss felt deeply.

Francis R. Stransky, a 39-year-old husband, and father of two. A policeman in the Central District for five years, Francis enjoyed patrolling the area around Cicero’s and the Belair market. He liked the people in the area, and he liked seeing the rich history of Baltimore as well he liked to grab a quick bite to eat in the Belair Market.

As we take this time to remember him, and thank him for his service and sacrifice. We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace.

Patrolman, 39, dies after subduing man.
Jan 11 1964
Patrolman Francis Stransky, 39, of the Central District collapsed and died after subduing a 23-year-old maintenance man in the 500 block of Endor Street last night. Police said the patrolman was involved in an altercation with the man, subdued him, escorted him for treatment to Mercy Hospital and took his prisoner to the Central District station before collapsing. He was pronounced dead at 6:55 PM police said an autopsy was scheduled. The man was held for investigation

Man Charged With Murder
Jan 12 1964

A 22-year-old man was charged with homicide yesterday in the heart attack death of 39-year-old Central District Patrolman Francis Stransky. Police charge. Larry G Wadsworth of the 1500 block of Gorsuch Ave. with homicide late yesterday following their investigation into the death Friday night of Patrolman Francis Stransky Patrolman Stransky became involved in an altercation shortly before 6 PM Friday in the 500 block of Ensor Street police said. He was struck at least once in the process, but subdued his assailant, and brought him to Mercy Hospital for treatment of minor injuries. The patrolman then took his prisoner to the central district station to book him. The policeman collapsed in the assembly room at the station and was pronounced dead at Mercy Hospital at 6:55 PM - The autopsy performed yesterday show patrolman Stransky died of a heart attack. Police said Wadsworth was then charged with assaulting the police officer and causing his death.

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HENRY W SUDMEIER
37-E: 4
End of Watch: December 20, 1934
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day 20 Dec 1934 in Baltimore Police History we lost our Brother Patrolman Henry W Sudmeier to accidental gun fire based on the following:

A little more than 8 years prior to his death Patrolman Henry Sudmeier was walking his beat in the Northern District. He was aware of a suspect robbing the poor boxes of local churches and of the Sacred Heart, so he stayed close to the Sacred Heart, a Catholic Church located at Mount Washington. It was during the night shift on a cool October night 1926, when he heard gunshots coming from inside the church, knowing of the recent poor box thefts, he grabbed his flashlight ( the papers back then called it an electric torch ) and ran in. Like all police he didn’t know what would be waiting for him inside, he didn’t know a suspect by the name Henry “Hank” Connelley, recently released from the Maryland State Penitentiary had entered the church earlier to steal money from the poor box. He didn’t know Captain Frank Gatch had set two plain clothes officers inside the church on a detail to catch “Hank” Connelley; he also didn’t know that when those detail officers, Patrolman Melvin Jackson and Patrolman Joseph Young, spotted Connelley and commanded him to “HALT”; Connelley would refuse and brake for the church entrance. This is what caused Officers Jackson and Young to begin firing on Connelley, and as a chain of events, it would be those gunshots that would cause Connelley to duck down near the pews where Officer Sudmeier was about to enter.

As Sudmeier entered the church he didn’t know lighting his flashlight would cause the young officers on this detail to mistake him for Connelley, and begin firing on him. Once shot Patrolman Sudmeier fell to the floor, Hank Connelley got up and started to run, but was quickly captured by Officers Jackson and Young. It was only as they were leaving the church that they would discover Officer Sudmeier was shot; he was lying there on the floor bleeding from a wound in the right side of his abdomen, (An extremely painful injury), but he didn’t say a word, not a single moan. So while one policeman handcuffed Hank Connelley, the other summoned an ambulance to hurry Patrolman Sudmeier to the hospital. Once there it was found that he has suffered a severe wound, and an operation was performed immediately. Surgeons were not confident regarding his chance for recovery.

Nonetheless Patrolman Sudmeier was as tough as they get, he had faith, and was optimistic. He also had one thing every good man has, and that was a good woman by his side. From his bed at Mercy Hospital he was recovering in leaps, and bounds, above what any of the doctors had expected. He would eventually be moved from Mercy Hospital to Mercy Villa, on Bellona Avenue. His condition was improving beyond expectations of the medical staff; he was able to get in and out of bed, to a wheelchair, (with assistance). He was paralyzed, so he knew he would never walk again. There is a certain amount of psychological grief, depression and other things to deal with when you learn of things like this; but at the time of his injury he was only about a year on the force, and a newlywed of just two months. His wife, Mrs. Lentha Sudmeier, gave him hope; she made him push forward, and without a single word made him work harder (I know the feeling, and the benefits of a good wife. In this type condition in front of the woman of your dreams, you don’t want to fail, so you give it everything you have.) Mrs. Ientha, came to the hospital to be with her husband every day, her love for him became his strength… and it seemed to be working – On one of his biggest nights of his life in the police force, came in June 1930 (It had been 4 years since being shot) and he was a guest of honor in the hospital auditorium where a party, or policemen’s ball was held. It was attended by 1800 patrolman of the day, the Police Commissioner “Charles D. Gaither” (he was the first PC in the modern police department, a department with just one commissioner instead of the board of commissioner that previously held the position) alongside the Commissioner was, Chief Inspector, George D Heary, Inspector Stephen G. Nelson and every captain on the force. Patrolman Henry W Sudmeier was about as proud as anyone could be that night. All that for him, all of it in front of his wife, and family it had to make them proud of him, it was a great day.

After that he was in and out of bed; he was able to be rolled out to the garden/park for some sun and fresh air. But unfortunately, his injuries were too many, and caused more weakness, with weakness came a decreased immune system, and before long infections were too much. He was taking several small steps forward, and then huge leaps back. This went on for four more years, looking good, and then looking bad, until an infection would set in that was so strong Officer Sudmeier would be forced to go back to Mercy Hospital. And like his first trip to Mercy eight year earlier; immediately upon his arrival surgeons would rush him in to surgery. They tried everything, still he steadily grew worse, and before long there was nothing they could do. Then on 19 Dec 1934 at 7:30 O’clock his death would come. Physicians said it was due to congestion of the lungs, brought on by his decreased vitality that was indirectly attributable to the gun-shot wound from eight years earlier. Patrolman Sudmeier was 36 years old at the time of his death.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.


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OWEN EUGENE SWEENEY JR

34-E: 20
End of Watch: May 7, 1997
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Baltimore Sun Article Dated 05/08/1997
A veteran city police lieutenant helping his fellow officers on a routine call was killed yesterday afternoon after he was hit by a shotgun blast fired through a wooden door at a Northeast Baltimore home. Lt. Owen E. Sweeney, Jr., 47, who was one month shy of his 29th anniversary with the department, was pronounced dead at 4:04 p.m. after more than three hours of surgery at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. He is survived by his wife and two sons. Friends say Lt. Sweeney was counting the days to retirement – 815 – and had just bought a 28 – foot cabin cruiser that was to be delivered next week. Last night police charged Baron Michael Cherry, 41, of the 5900 Block of Bertram Avenue with first degree murder and using a deadly weapon in the commission of a felony… Officers who knew the lieutenant – the first city officer killed in the line of duty in four years – praised their supervisor for favoring street work over paperwork. On Tuesday, he had been the first officer to confront a man holding an Uzi semiautomatic weapon during a robbery attempt at the Northwood Shopping Center. It wasn’t beneath him, “because he wore a gold badge, to do police work with the rest of us,” said Officer John D. Platt, a friend and 14-year veteran. Yesterday, Lt. Sweeney was doing paperwork in his office when he heard a call on the radio summoning officers to a house on Bertram Avenue in Hamilton. He quickly joined his officers at the house.  Lt. Sweeney tried to talk to the man behind a closed wooden door to an apartment at the top of a second-floor stairwell. “We’re here to help you, we’re not here to hurt you,” Lt. Sweeney said, according to Platt who was standing next to him. The officers and Lt. Sweeney turned and started to walk downstairs when the shotgun blast blew away part of the door. Lt. Sweeney, struck in the lower left back, collapsed into Officer Platt’s arms. Officers pulled him down the stairs and outside. Moments later, Platt said, Cherry walked out of the room, unarmed and with his hands in the air, and apologized. He struggled with police as they placed him in custody.


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FORREST EDWARD TAYLOR

25-E: 28
End of Watch: August 29, 2012
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D. Decorated Baltimore police officer dies months after crash - 17 year veteran was responding to a call
September 05, 2012|By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun                         
Baltimore police are mourning the death of a decorated officer who died last week after complications from surgery stemming from a Feb. 18 on-duty car accident. Officer Forrest "Dino" Taylor, 44, of Annapolis, died Aug. 29 after undergoing the latest in a series of medical procedures. He had been injured in a crash at a stoplight in Mount Vernon while responding to a call. "Each and every day Officer Forrest 'Dino' Taylor and his fellow officers place their lives on the line to make our neighborhoods safer," Police Commissioner-designee Anthony W. Batts said in a statement. "We will never forget Officer Taylor's dedication and commitment to making downtown Baltimore a better place to live and work." On Feb. 18 at 5:50 a.m., Taylor activated the lights and siren in his police cruiser and traveled through a red light in the 600 block of Guilford Avenue in Mount Vernon while on the way to assist another officer, according to police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi. Taylor's vehicle was hit by a sports utility vehicle driving through a green light, police said. The cruiser struck a pole and fire hydrant and came to rest in the 500 block of Guilford, police said. Officers filed no citations against the driver of the SUV. The officer was not found at fault, either. Police are taught to use caution when driving through red lights in emergency situations, but that does not always prevent crashes, Guglielmi said. "This was just a tragic, tragic accident," he said. A 17-year veteran of the department, Taylor worked in jobs throughout the agency, including stints as a homicide detective in 2003 and a violent crimes investigator in 2008. He received four commendations from the department, including three for his work with a task force that in 2000 served 4,500 warrants and cleared 150 percent of cases (that calculation includes cases from previous years). Taylor was best known for walking his foot post in the downtown community, police said. He is survived by his wife and two children. "Officer Taylor backed up the quality of his service with his life," Guglielmi said. "He was responding in an emergency capacity to help a complete stranger. It's a sobering reminder of what police officers do every day." Taylor is the fourth Baltimore police officer to die in the line of duty since 2010. His funeral service is scheduled for Friday, Sept. 7, at 10 a.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen at 5200 N. Charles Street.

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WILLIAM HENRY TORBIT JR
42-W: 28
End of Watch: January 9, 2011
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Witnesses: Slain officer overwhelmed by crowd, police fired as he lay on ground Police say 41 shots fired in incident outside club Sunday
From a Franklin Street apartment, a university employee and her roommate have a broad view of the nightclub parking lot where police say six people were shot Sunday — an incident that left a plainclothes police officer and a 22-year-old man dead. As an unusually large crowd attracted a significant police presence, the two opened a window and watched the events that led up to the shooting outside the Select Lounge in the 400 block of N. Paca St. The women, both 26, saw the plainclothes officer get overwhelmed by an unruly crowd, then watched as two uniformed officers opened fire while he lay on the ground. The women also saw the pained reaction of the slain officer's partners once they realized what had happened. It's a scene they haven't been able to get out of their minds. "I've never seen somebody killed," the university employee said Monday. City police have not given a detailed account of the night's events, saying the investigation will take three weeks to complete. There are dozens of witnesses, and police are seeking to piece together those accounts along with physical evidence and surveillance camera footage. But the account of the women is consistent with what law enforcement sources believe took place, and along with information provided by police, it offers a vivid account of the chaotic incident. Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III confirmed at an afternoon news conference that no civilian weapons were fired, and said five officers — including slain Officer William H. Torbit Jr. — fired a total of 41 rounds during the incident. Bealefeld said police were "committed to conducting a comprehensive and thorough investigation." "We must understand it, learn from it, and emerge better," he said. "We owe it to all the victims to be thorough and complete, and only release confirmed facts." Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the shooting "raises a lot of questions" and that she and Bealefeld are open to an external review of the incident following the Police Department's internal review. The university employee, who did not want her name or school made public, and her roommate, Lakeisha Hutcherson, said in separate interviews with The Baltimore Sun that the incident unfolded about 1:15 a.m. According to the roommates, they first noticed a group of women walking to their cars outside the club when a vehicle began to pull out and almost hit one of them. One of the women became angry and began to hit the car with her shoe, trying to attack the driver, and a man in a pink shirt attempted to calm them down. The driver was able to pull off, but the woman remained agitated. A man — who the roommates would later learn was Torbit, 33, — walked over, wearing a brown or black jacket. Neither woman said they saw a badge, though they said he might have been wearing one. Police say Torbit, a narcotics officer, was on-duty and in plainclothes. Normally an officer on such an assignment would not be working crowd control, but he had been called to the scene after dispatchers put out a "Signal 13" — that code, for an officer in distress, typically draws scores of officers looking to help. Officers at the scene were trying to deal with fights inside that spilled out of the recently opened club, and Torbit found himself in the middle of the fracas. "I thought he was just a guy trying to break up the altercation," the university employee said. "He was telling them, 'Stop. Go home.'" Hutcherson added: "He was trying to push people out of the way, trying to stop the fight. He was trying to make peace, and it seemed like some guys took it wrong." In a flash, they said, a large crowd began fighting and "overtook" the plainclothes officer, who disappeared in a sea of people. The 22-year-old who was slain has been identified by relatives as Sean Gamble. His brother told The Baltimore Sun Sunday night that Gamble had witnessed Torbit being aggressive toward a woman and that Gamble started arguing with him. That escalated to an altercation, the brother said. The women say that is not what they saw. "I didn't see [the plainclothes officer] being aggressive with her — she was aggressive," the university employee said. "It looked like he was trying to break it up, to stop it from escalating. I don't even know how the other guys got involved." Then the women saw two uniformed officers approach, and heard a shot. They aren't sure who fired the shot — it was not the uniformed officers, the roommates said — and none of those fighting seemed to react. It is believed that the shot came from Torbit's weapon, though police said they are checking ballistics to confirm that. A few seconds later, a second shot went off, the roommates said, and people started running. 

Officer One Of 2 Killed At Club
Sources: Police Investigating Whether Shooting Was Friendly Fire
Baltimore Sun reporter Timothy Wheeler contributed to this article
Justin Fenton 
Jan 10, 2011

Baltimore police officers might have shot and killed a fellow officer and an unarmed man after observing the officer draw his weapon while trying to quell a disturbance outside a club near downtown early Sunday, according to law enforcement sources and a relative of one of the victims. Police released few details about the circumstances of the shooting, but they described a chaotic scene outside the Select Lounge in the 400 block of N. Paca St., with fights spilling out of the club and into the street around 1:15 a.m. "There was an altercation that took place very near the club and some officers worked to intercede in that fight, at which time some gunshots were discharged," said Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. "Several officers fired multiple shots." Sources said Officer William H. Torbit Jr., 33, an eight-year veteran, and 22-year-old Sean Gamble, a semi-professional football player who had no criminal record, were killed in the gunfire. Four others - a second officer and three women - were wounded, police said. Three law enforcement sources briefed on the investigation, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was still under way, said witnesses told detectives that Torbit was in plainclothes and was being attacked by a group of people. Police said his badge apparently came off during the scuffle. It is believed that the officers who responded to the scene shot at him after he drew his weapon, said the law enforcement sources and the victim's relative, who was also a witness. Gamble's brother, James Gamble, who was at the club, said he saw Torbit - who he believed was off-duty - acting aggressively toward a woman. His brother started arguing with the officer and the discussion escalated, said Gamble, 24. He said a group of uniformed officers began firing on the crowd when the plainclothes officer reached for his service weapon. "It was a crazy scene," Gamble said. "They let off a good 20 shots, maybe six [officers]. They were just shooting." Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi confirmed Sunday evening that police were exploring whether officers had shot another officer in the midst of the chaotic situation. He said no civilian weapons had been recovered. The violence comes on the heels of a number of high-profile incidents downtown, many of them connected to the city's nightlife. In March, two people were shot outside the Velvet Rope, a club that police have pushed to shut down. A month before that, a security guard was fatally shot on Light Street, and in June an off-duty police officer was charged with fatally shooting an unarmed man during an altercation outside a Mount Vernon club. A Marine, celebrating before his redeployment to Afghanistan, was fatally shot at a downtown hookah bar in July, and a city police officer was shot and wounded in November after approaching an armed man near the city's adult entertainment district. An off-duty Baltimore detective was killed in October when he was hit in the head during an argument over a parking space in Canton. "This is an absolutely horrible incident," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said of Sunday's shootings. "I prayed we would never lose another officer, but here we are again." Torbit's death comes four years to the day after Officer Troy Lamont Chesley was killed during an attempted carjacking. Chesley was the last officer to die in an attack while on duty. If police determine that Torbit was killed by friendly fire, it would be the first such incident since an off-duty officer, Norman Stamp, was killed at a Southeast Baltimore bar in 2008. Police said at the time that officers responding to a call about a fight encountered Stamp - whom they didn't recognize as a fellow officer - wearing brass knuckles and shot him when he reached for his weapon. Stamp's widow last year lost a civil lawsuit filed against the officer who shot her husband. Police would not confirm Torbit's identity Sunday, and police union officials said they were waiting for the department to formally identify the officer before commenting on his death. News of Torbit's death stunned his next-door neighbor, Fafo Asres, who called the officer "a very nice person" who had helped maintain his neighborhood off Rolling Road in western Baltimore County. Torbit cleaned up trash and debris on the street and offered to haul waste items away in his truck for other residents, Asres said.

Torbit also had kidded around with Asres' children, the neighbor said. "My kids, they love him and call him 'Uncle Will,' " Asres said, adding that Torbit was "a very good example" for young people. Though Torbit apparently lived alone, his neighbor described the officer as a "family man," with a number of relatives in the area. "He was there for his family," Asres said. Asres said that he last saw Torbit on New Year's Eve and that the officer had told him he was working that night. "I'm just sad," Asres said. Gamble's relatives, meanwhile, said they believed police acted recklessly in firing on the crowd outside the nightclub. Corey Brown, 31, who said he is Sean Gamble's godbrother, said Sunday night that Gamble had a young child and was engaged to be married. Brown said Gamble worked for a waste management company and had no criminal record, a fact confirmed by a search of court records. "He's not a violent kid - he's not in the streets," said Brown, who was not at the club early Sunday morning. "He's not even cut from that cloth. Apparently he got in a fight and the cops start shooting. Not in the air - in the crowd, and they shot him." James Gamble said that the shots sent clubgoers running in every direction and that he located his brother underneath a vehicle. Sean Gamble had been shot in the chest, he said. James Gamble and dozens of others were detained for questioning by police. Sean Gamble, who went to Woodlawn High School, was a member of the Baltimore Saints semi-pro football league, playing linebacker and wearing number 56. Brown said Sean Gamble had a "huge heart and was really a person you wanted to be around." "He was loyal, loyal to the death," Brown said. At a news conference outside Maryland Shock Trauma Center before sunrise Sunday, police said they could not say what prompted the officers to fire or whether anyone other than the officers had fired a gun. "We're a few hours into this whole ordeal, and we have scores of detectives working on the case, processing evidence, interviewing witnesses," Bealefeld said. "We have a ton of work to do to put together the facts of what happened." Police had few additional details to offer later Sunday. Detectives were reviewing surveillance camera footage and other physical evidence. Select Lounge opened late in October a few blocks north of Lexington Market and has sought to attract an upscale crowd. Its Facebook page describes a strict dress code and boasts of a VIP lounge for the "ultimate in discreet experiences" for "sophisticated club connoisseurs, savvy socialites, A-list celebrities and the Baltimore's [sic] elite." Ravens player Dannell Ellerbe chose the club to celebrate his birthday in December. At the scene Sunday morning, police tape blocked a parking lot adjacent to the Select Lounge that was still full of cars as detectives interviewed clubgoers at police headquarters. A "VIP Parking" sandwich board lay in the street. By afternoon, all that remained in the parking lot were empty liquor bottles and scattered fliers for coming events at nightspots around the city. Calls made to a phone number for the club's owners were not immediately returned. "What we need to figure out is what sparked the shooting," said Guglielmi. "Was there a weapon drawn by a civilian? Was the officer's weapon taken? We've got to put together a timeline and figure out what happened." On Twitter, people lamented Baltimore's continuing nightlife violence. "Can't even go out anymore," one person wrote. Another said: "This has to stop."

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Baltimore Sun reporter Timothy Wheeler contributed to this article.

Credit: The Baltimore Sun

Pair Say Police Officer
41 Shots Fired in Incident outside Nightclub

Baltimore Sun reporters Julie Scharper and Yeganeh June Torbati contributed to this article
Justin Fenton
Jan 11, 2011

From a Franklin Street apartment, a university employee and her roommate have a broad view of the nightclub parking lot where police say six people were shot Sunday - an incident that left a plainclothes police officer and a 22-year-old man dead. As an unusually large crowd attracted a significant police presence, the two opened a window and watched the events that led up to the shooting outside the Select Lounge in the 400 block of N. Paca St. The women, both 26, saw the plainclothes officer get overwhelmed by an unruly crowd, then watched as two uniformed officers opened fire while he lay on the ground. The women also saw the pained reaction of the slain officer's partners once they realized what had happened. It's a scene they haven't been able to get out of their minds. "I've never seen somebody killed," the university employee said Monday. City police have not given a detailed account of the night's events, saying the investigation will take three weeks to complete. There are dozens of witnesses, and police are seeking to piece together those accounts along with physical evidence and surveillance camera footage. But the account of the women is consistent with what law enforcement sources believe took place, and along with information provided by police, it offers a vivid account of the chaotic incident. Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III confirmed at an afternoon news conference that no civilian weapons were fired, and said five officers - including slain officer William H. Torbit Jr. - fired a total of 41 rounds during the incident. Bealefeld said police were "committed to conducting a comprehensive and thorough investigation." "We must understand it, learn from it, and emerge better," he said. "We owe it to all the victims to be thorough and complete, and only release confirmed facts." Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the shooting "raises a lot of questions" and that she and Bealefeld are open to an external review of the incident following the Police Department's internal review. The university employee, who did not want her name or school made public, and her roommate, Lakeisha Hutcherson, said in separate interviews with The Baltimore Sun that the incident unfolded about 1:15 a.m. According to the roommates, they first noticed a group of women walking to their cars outside the club when a vehicle began to pull out and almost hit one of them. One of the women became angry and began to hit the car with her shoe, trying to attack the driver, and a man in a pink shirt attempted to calm them down. The driver was able to pull off, but the woman remained agitated. A man - who the roommates would later learn was Torbit, 33, - walked over, wearing a brown or black jacket. Neither woman said they saw a badge, though they said he might have been wearing one. Police say Torbit, a narcotics officer, was on-duty and in plainclothes. Normally an officer on such an assignment would not be working crowd control, but he had been called to the scene after dispatchers put out a "Signal 13" - that code, for an officer in distress, typically draws scores of officers looking to help. Officers at the scene were trying to deal with fights inside that spilled out of the recently opened club, and Torbit found himself in the middle of the fracas. "I thought he was just a guy trying to break up the altercation," the university employee said. "He was telling them, 'Stop. Go home.' " Hutcherson added: "He was trying to push people out of the way, trying to stop the fight. He was trying to make peace, and it seemed like some guys took it wrong." In a flash, they said, a large crowd began fighting and "overtook" the plainclothes officer, who disappeared in a sea of people. The 22-year-old who was slain has been identified by relatives as Sean Gamble. His brother told The Baltimore Sun Sunday night that Sean Gamble had witnessed Torbit being aggressive toward a woman and that Gamble started arguing with him. That escalated to an altercation, the brother said. The women say that is not what they saw. "I didn't see [the plainclothes officer] being aggressive with her - she was aggressive," the university employee said. "It looked like he was trying to break it up, to stop it from escalating. I don't even know how the other guys got involved." Then the women saw two uniformed officers approach, and heard a shot. They aren't sure who fired the shot - it was not the uniformed officers, the roommates said - and none of those fighting seemed to react. It is believed that the shot came from Torbit's weapon, though police said they are checking ballistics to confirm that. A few seconds later, a second shot went off, the roommates said, and people started running. Hutcherson left the window to check on her young daughter, but her roommate continued watching. The university employee said the man in the dark jacket was lying on his back, his arms splayed out. She could not see a weapon, though police said there's no indication that his gun was taken from him at any point during the fight. "The [plainclothes officer] was ... on his back, and two uniformed officers, they took a couple steps back and just fired at him while he was lying on the ground," the university employee said. Hutcherson, who heard multiple gunshots, recounted how her roommate relayed to her what was happening: "She said, 'Oh my God, they're killing him. He's not even moving, he's laying on the ground with his hands up.' " "Another cop, a heavy-set guy with 'Police' on his back, was screaming [expletives]," she said. "A cop in a brown hoodie fell to his knees, and that's when we knew [the victim] was a cop." A third witness, 39-year-old Jacques Steptoe, said Monday that he had been watching the crowd from his fourth-floor window at a nearby nursing home on North Paca Street. He has been recovering from surgery and couldn't sleep that night, he said. From his vantage point, catty-corner to the roommates' apartment, he said he believed someone sprayed Mace and that Torbit whipped his right arm around, gripping his service weapon, and fired a shot into the crowd. When the uniformed officers saw that, they began opening fire, causing him to fall back. "He fell down with the gun in his hand just like that," Steptoe said, bringing his arms over his head. He said he saw "five or six" officers then approach Torbit, some of them still shooting. At Monday's news conference, police identified the officers who fired their weapons as Harry Dodge, 37, an 11-year veteran; Harry Pawley, 40, a 17-year veteran; Toyia Williams, 36, a 13-year veteran; and Latora Craig, 30, a nine-year veteran. Dodge was shot in the foot, police said. Only Craig has ever discharged her weapon before, said police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi. Her gun fired into a wall during a struggle for the weapon with a suspect in July 2010. She was cleared and returned to duty. Dodge, Pawley, Williams and Craig have been placed on routine administrative suspension with pay pending an investigation and have not given statements about the shooting. Michael Davey, an attorney for the Fraternal Order of Police, said the officers do not have to speak with investigators because the case - like all police-involved shootings - is considered a criminal investigation. But he said all of the officers intend to speak with detectives in coming days. As Torbit lay on the ground, a law enforcement source said, an off-duty medic who was among the clubgoers began tending to him. The roommates said they saw officers pick up Torbit by his arms and legs and carry him to the back seat of a car. The car was surrounded by hordes of people, but the officers eventually were able to drive off, taking him to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was pronounced dead. Meanwhile, a group of people was advancing on the uniformed officers who had fired their weapons, apparently angry at what they had observed, and officers began deploying Tasers and slamming people onto the hoods of cars. "It was out of control," Hutcherson said. A few feet away, they noticed another victim: Sean Gamble. The waste management worker, who has no criminal record, was lying under a car that appeared to be trying to pull away. They said Gamble - whose brother says he was shot in the chest - remained there for what seemed like 30 minutes before an ambulance came. They saw medics pumping his chest. "We're right near Maryland General, University Hospital, and no one came for a long time," Hutcherson said. Fire Department officials did not respond to a request for records that would show how long it took for medics to respond. The roommates continued to watch the incident unfold. They said crime scene technicians did not arrive until 4 a.m., with people leaving the club "trampling" on the crime scene. Neither woman has called police to report what they saw; both said they are fearful of officers after observing the incident and the police response. But they said they wanted the public to know what they saw. "I didn't know it was a cop, but no one deserves to be shot at like that," the university employee said. "I felt like it was ridiculously excessive and unnecessary. There was no need for that shooting to happen."
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Baltimore Sun reporters Julie Scharper and Yeganeh June Torbati contributed to this article.

Credit: The Baltimore Sun

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RONALD L TRACEY

19-E: 1
End of Watch: July 20, 1981
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1981 we lost our brother Police  Officer Ronald L. Tracey to gun fire based on the following 

Western District Officer Ronald L. Tracey, 28, was murdered as he investigated a property damage accident at Monroe and Baker Streets shortly before midnight on July 20, 1981. As about 11:15 p.m. he responded to that location to process the accident scene. As is normal for this type of incident on a warm summer night, a number of citizens gathered to watch as wreckers were called to the scene to remove inoperable vehicles. Those who had been involved in the accident provided Officer Tracey with the appropriate information. There was no tension and no problems. Things remained “routine” until about 11:45 p.m. when a citizen came out of the crowd and snuck up behind the Officer who was concentrating on the work at hand. He jumped the officer and a life and death struggle began. Officer Tracey was able to broadcast one frantic call for assistance. He did not have time to identify himself or give his location. The assailant wrestled the officer’s service revolver from its holster and shot the officer in the stomach and in the head. Witnesses later told investigating detectives that while this was occurring, the crowd retreated, with not one citizen coming to the assistance of the officer. Citizens did call Police Communications, which dispatched appropriate units. Officer Tracey was transported to Lutheran Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Investigating officers and detectives recovered his service revolver about two blocks from the scene of the homicide. Citizens called police with information regarding the possible identity of the assailant and throughout the early morning hours, police searched for him. At 5:00 a.m. on July 21, 1981, Northeastern District Officers located and arrested the man as he slept on the floor of Northeast Baltimore residence. He was apprehended and detained in Baltimore City Jail.

He will forever be missed, but never will he be forgotten by us his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department.. God Bless and Rest in Peace.


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FRED R UNGER

34-E: 11
End of Watch: January 13, 1947
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 13 January 1947, we lost our brother Police Officer Fred R. Unger to gunfire based on the following:

January 13th 1947 was much like it has been here lately; the high was 37.9F with a low in the area of 27F there was a heavy fog with rain, and drizzle throughout the week almost as it has been this year 2014. Crime back then was normal Baltimore crime; they had their burglars, their drug dealers, their thieves and their stick up men. On this particular day there was a punk by the name of Milford E. Davis. Milford found his niche in the crime world sticking up cab drivers and taking their hard earned cash, on this night he had committed one such hold up already from a cab driver on the corner of Saratoga St. near Gay St. After that stick-up, he made his way up to, and over to, the Central District. He was nearing the 900 Blk. of Brevard Alley where he was on the hunt for another cab to hit. By now his description was given to all police in the area, and two of Central’s long time partners, Officer George Pfaff, and Fred Unger were on a different hunt, instead of looking for someone to steal from, they were on the lookout for someone about to rob a cab, and it wouldn’t take long for Fred to spot a potential suspect, a fellow matching the description given out earlier, pointing the suspect out to his partner, Officer Unger would call out to the suspect asking him, “Hey! Hey, you there! What are you running from?” and the suspect looking over points to his chest as if to ask if they were talking to him, Unger confirms they were, and asked him to come to their vehicle, out of breath the suspect couldn’t say much, but remained calm throughout their interaction, he strolled over to their car, calm and collected as he was catching his breath… he acted as if he had nothing to hide, not a worry in the world, his calmness took the officers off their normal guard. They thought perhaps this is not the right guy; still they would talk to him, as he may have seen something, he may have some information to lead them in the right direction.

The suspect continued walking calmly to their car, eventually he would be alongside the car, as he was coming in from a direction in front of their car he would pass the officers, (still seated in their car), then turn and come up behind the officer from a different angle, before a single question could be asked of him, his attitude would change, he went from calm, cool, and collected, into rage, drawing his .25 caliber semi-automatic pistol from his waist band, he would fire several shots into the car, striking Officer Unger several times.

Officer Pfaff quickly bailed from the car, taking a safe vantage point while drawing his weapon, then as he came up to find his target, he saw the suspect was running away, Pfaff chased the suspect past the east side of the Armory into an alley beside a warehouse near Dolphin St. Then he was gone, Pfaff lost the visual he had on the suspect when they were someplace near Dolphin Street and Linden Green. He was being fired on by Davis and had a chance to take a shot back, but looked toward the background and saw the suspect was running toward a group of people, he feared had he missed it could have led to one or more of them being shot. So he did the next best thing, he armed himself with a description and went back to his vehicle to check on his partner, and call in that description so the other officers in the area could look for him.

Once back to his car he found his partner, Officer Frederick R. Unger had been struck in the head, the face, and several times in his upper body… Pfaff somewhat in shock quickly called for medical attention, then giving the description of the suspect, with warnings of his danger and a direction of travel. Now armed with a clothing description that direction of travel, it wouldn’t be long when another set of Central District best known partners, Officers Joseph Levin, and John Griffin were on his trail. They were at the corner Morris Alley and Dolphin Street, when they met with the same gunman and the same weapon that fatally wounded their friend and brother patrolman Unger. Officers Levin and Griffin were ready for what might be coming, they called out to the suspect, who did what he knew best, he spun, drew and fired on the officers; who in turn did what they knew, they shot him. They recovered the gun he used to kill Officer Unger, as well as the money stolen in the earlier cab robbery.

Officer Unger died that night trying to make Baltimore a safer place, for all of us. Officer’s Levin, and Griffin fired their guns and killed a man, they did this while bullets were being fired in their direction and from the gun of a guy that didn’t care who he hurt, he didn’t care about his backdrop, which brings us to Officer Pfaff who refused to shoot at a fleeing felon, while he himself was being fired on, so that he wouldn’t accidently shoot someone in the background, he put public safety ahead of his own safety. These are the brave men of the Baltimore Police department.

Officer Unger was married and the father of 2 daughters, Carol (eight) and Gail Patricia (eighteen months). Officer Fred R. Unger was 38 years of age and a 3 year veteran of the force.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police department will not let him be forgotten, as we take this time to remember him and thank him for his service and sacrifice.


1 black devider 800 8 72 MARCELLUS WARD
6-W: 13
End of Watch: December 3, 1984
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Detective Ward, an undercover narcotics officer, was shot and killed as he was making a narcotics related buy prior to a raid on December 3, 1984. Detective Marcellus Ward, 36, and other members of a specialized DEA task force were in the closing stages of an investigation with a final “heroin buy” from the suspects. It was shortly after 5:00 p.m. when one of the targets left 1829 Frederick Avenue to go to Pennsylvania Station to check on the money with which the narcotics purchase was to be made. Following an established plan, the suspect was arrested when he arrived to pick up the money. Task Force members then responded to 1829 Frederick Avenue. The building contained a candy store on the street level and a residential area on the second and third floors. Search and Seizure Warrants were to be executed. Members of the Task Force made a tactical entry through the front door, with Detective Ward still inside the residence, then made their way to the staircase in the rear of the building. Once inside, they loudly identified themselves as Police Officers, and began to scale the narrow, twisting flight of stairs. That’s when they heard a series of gunshots. As they neared the third floor, Agents and Detectives confronted the suspect who had fired several shots causing them to seek cover. There was a brief period of negotiation, two handguns were thrown out into the hallway, and the suspect surrendered. Detectives entered the apartment and found Detective Ward, shot four times, dead. Detective Ward was shot as he sat on the suspects couch. Valiant efforts to preserve his life failed. Detective Marcellus Ward was a member of the Department for 13 years. He was married and the loving father of two children. Detective Ward was laid to rest on December 7, 1984.

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MARTIN WEBB
39-E: 17
End of Watch: August 9, 1971
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Article from the Police Newsletter from August 1971
On Sunday evening, the 1st of August, a freak summer storm of tropical intensity hit the northern and northeastern sections of Baltimore City and County. At least sixteen persons died as a result of the storm and the flash flooding caused by it. Lieutenant Martin E. Webb of the Southern District was one of those victims. Baltimore County Police discovered his automobile the following morning. All of the vehicle’s doors were open. No trace was found of the Lieutenant. Later, witnesses reported that they had seen the Lieutenant park and leave his vehicle in a heroic, successful attempt to rescue a woman trapped inside her overturned automobile. The Lieutenant was last seen as he was swept away by the intensity of the floodwaters that surrounded him. A seventeen-year veteran of the Department, Martin Webb had been promoted to Lieutenant in March of this year. Prior to his assignment in the Southern District he had been assigned to the Laboratory Division. He had also served in the Central District and in the Motorized Section of the Traffic Division. The Lieutenant’s body was recovered on Tuesday, August 3rd, in Kahler’s Run, approximately one half mile away from where he had rescued the woman. For two days before the discovery, Lieutenant Donald Sutton had twelve off-duty Southern District Patrolmen in a futile attempt to locate him. The Lieutenant is survived by his widow, Frances, and their two children. Lieutenant Webb did not hesitate to risk his life in order to save the life of another. His tragic death was the direct result of the compassion and concern he held for his fellow man, a dedication commensurate with the esteem in which his memory will forever be held.

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IRA NEIL WEINER
44-E: 18
End of Watch: September 21, 1992
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
After responding to a call for service at 1929 W. Mulberry Street, Officer Weiner became involved in a life-or-death struggle with a suspect high on drugs and armed with an ice pick. Without provocation or warning, Officer Weiner was savagely attacked and stabbed repeatedly with the ice pick. The suspect than grabbed Officer Weiner’ pistol and ripped it from his holster. The suspect stood over Officer Weiner and shot him in the back of the head. The suspect then began an exchange of gunfire with the responding backup officers. The responding backup officers cut down the suspect in a hail of gunfire.

1 black devider 800 8 72

FRANK WARREN WHITBY JR
49-E: 8
End of Watch: May 5, 1974
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Shortly after 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 6, 1974, Officers Frank Whitby and William Nowakowski, working 311 post, received a call to back-up a unit, which was handling a call for an armed person in the 1900 Block of Lanvale Street. Officer Whitby took the shotgun from the trunk of his patrol car and approached the door of the house with his fellow officers. The three officers confronted the woman who answered the door. She assured them that the suspect was in the house but was not armed. Carefully, they entered the dwelling, Officer Whitby in the lead. Suddenly, a volley of shots erupted from the far end of the hallway. Officer Whitby was struck three times and fell to the floor. His fellow officers obtained cover and returned fire. Officer Whitby crawled from the hallway to the safety of the street. Additional back up units arrived and the business of getting the suspect out of the house began. The 42-year-old suspect finally surrendered to Police Officers after several minutes of negotiations. Officer Whitby, a 22-year-old father of two small daughters, succumbed to the massive abdominal wound on May 5th at Johns Hopkins Hospital.


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JOHN C WILLIAMS
35-E: 16
End of Watch: August 21, 1967
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Officer Williams was seated inside his radio car writing a report as his partner was fueling the vehicle at the Northern District. (Keswick and 34th St.) The car suddenly caught fire and exploded, severely burning Officer Williams. He died several weeks later as a result of the injuries sustained.


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BRIAN DONTE WINDER

63-W: 24
End of Watch: July 3, 2004
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
Biographical Info Age: 36 Tour of Duty: 10 years Cause of Death: Gunfire Date of Incident: Saturday, July 3, 2004 Weapon Used: Handgun; 9 mm Suspect Info: One committed suicide; One apprehended. 

Officer Winder was shot and killed by two men, one of which he had arrested earlier in the week for selling illegal copies of CDs and DVDs. Officer Winder responded to a 911 call at approximately 2100 hours, in which the caller asked authorities to remove someone from their residence. When Officer Winder arrived, he was warned that one of the men might be armed. The officer spotted two people who fit the description and called out to them. Both suspects fled into a liquor store on Edmondson Avenue. As Officer Winder approached the store, the suspects opened fire from within, striking Officer Winder twice in the legs and once in the chest just above his vest. One suspect then exited the store and continued firing at the officer. He was able to escape, but the second suspect was captured after responding officers fired at him. Officer Winder was transported to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center where he died. The suspect who escaped was located in a Baltimore motel on the morning of July 7. He committed suicide as the Baltimore Police Department's Quick Response Team entered his room. Officer Winder had served with the Baltimore City Police Department for 10 years, and was assigned to the Southwest District. He is survived by his wife, two sons, and a stepdaughter.

Police  Officer Brian Donte Winder Baltimore City Police Department EOW: Saturday, July 3, 2004 Cause: Gunfire

On this day in Baltimore Police History 2004 we lost our brother - Police Officer Brian Donte Winder to gunfire based on the following:

Officer Winder was shot and killed by two men, one of which he had arrested earlier in the week for selling illegal copies of CDs and DVDs. Officer Winder responded to a 911 call at approximately 2100 hours, in which the caller asked authorities to remove someone from their residence. When Officer Winder arrived, he was warned that one of the men might be armed. The officer spotted two people who fit the description and called out to them. Both suspects fled into a liquor store on Edmondson Avenue. As Officer Winder approached the store, the suspects opened fire from within, striking Officer Winder twice in the legs and once in the chest just above his vest. One suspect then exited the store and continued firing at the officer. He was able to escape, but the second suspect was captured after responding officers fired at him. Officer Winder was transported to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center where he died. The suspect who escaped was located in a Baltimore motel on the morning of July 7. He committed suicide as the Baltimore Police Department's Quick Response Team entered his room. Officer Winder had served with the Baltimore City Police Department for 10 years, and was assigned to the Southwest District. He is survived by his wife, two sons, and a stepdaughter.

What follows is a Sun Paper Artle on these events

As family, friends mourn, police seek 2nd suspect in officer's death

Vigil held at liquor store where Winder was killed

July 05, 2004|By Ryan Davis | Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF

Baltimore police were searching yesterday for the man they believe fired some - if not all - of the bullets that killed a Southwestern District officer Saturday night while he was patrolling the neighborhood that was his lifelong home.

Immediately after the shooting in the Edmondson Village area, another man was arrested by an officer who fired at him and cornered him inside a nearby liquor store. Jermaine Gaines, 31, was charged yesterday with first-degree murder and handgun offenses in the death of 36- year-old Officer Brian D. Winder, police said.

Gaines has told detectives that the man who fled fired the shots that hit Winder, according to police. They obtained an arrest warrant yesterday naming the second suspect as Charles Bennett, 33, of the 3900 block of Flowerton Road in Edmondson Village.

Winder, a 10-year veteran of the department, was hit by three shots - including one in the left chest, just above his bulletproof vest, police said. He was pronounced dead at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where officers and his family gathered to grieve early yesterday.

"We lost a member of our family," Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said during a news conference yesterday afternoon. "It cuts deep."

The commissioner also used the news conference to lash out at the city's criminal justice system. Both Bennett and Gaines have been arrested several times and convicted of felonies, he said.

"Why are these people out on the street?" Clark asked repeatedly, and called the assailants "terrorists."

Domestic incident

The events that led to the fatal encounter began at 8:41 p.m. with a 911 call about a domestic incident from a West Baltimore woman who said she wanted a man out of her house, police said.

When Winder arrived at 8:48 p.m., police said, the woman told him that the man she had called about was Jermaine Gaines. She described the direction he went and said that he was armed, police said.

Winder, searching the area, spotted two men who matched Gaines' description about 9 p.m. outside G&G Village Liquors, a brick- and metal-front store in the 4600 block of Edmondson Ave., Clark said.

Winder called out to the men, who then entered the liquor store - and were cornered in its roughly 100-square-foot area where customers place orders through a security barrier.

As the men entered, Winder made a radio call requesting a back-up officer, police said. Like nearly all Baltimore police officers, he patrols alone in his car.

Within a minute after making the call, Winder entered the store and was shot three times: in the chest and in the legs. He never fired his gun, police said.

"He was clearly ambushed," Clark said.

The liquor store owners have said they heard four or five shots, and the first one sounded much louder than the others - suggesting that the first shot may have been fired inside, and the others as the two suspects were leaving. But police said most of the shooting occurred inside the store.

Winder called on his radio to report shots had been fired, left the store and collapsed on the pavement outside, police said.

Just as the shooting was ending, Officer Ed Lane arrived and fired at the two men. Gaines ran inside the store, unhurt, police said, while the other man ran away. It was unknown yesterday whether the other suspect was wounded.

Police recovered a 9 mm handgun inside the store, they said yesterday.

The description of events provided yesterday by police differed from the initial account provided to the media Saturday night.

Yesterday, yellow roses rested on the broken pavement where weeds grow from the cracks alongside Edmondson Avenue. Next to the roses were a discarded medical face mask and a splotch of dried blood.

George McKnight approached the store shortly after noon. He was sobbing.

"I just wanted to see where they killed my brother-in-law," said the 49-year-old neighborhood resident.

Winder, a 1985 graduate of Carver High School, joined the police force in 1994 and spent most of his career patrolling the streets in the Southwestern District, which includes the Edmondson Village area where he was raised. He served a brief stint in the department's internal affairs unit, returning to his home district in June 2003.

McKnight said he told his brother-in-law that internal affairs seemed like a good job.

"I need to be on the street," Winder responded, according to McKnight.

"He wanted to make a positive impression on the young people and get these drug dealers off the corner," McKnight added.

Winder was married and had two sons, Corey Winder, 15, and Brandon Winder, 7, and a 24-year-old stepdaughter, police said. The names of his wife and stepdaughter were not available.

Seven others killed

He was the first Baltimore officer killed in connection with his police work since November 2002, when Thomas G. Newman, a 12-year veteran, was shot while off duty at a Southeast Baltimore tavern. His killing was apparently in retaliation for having testified against two men who shot him in an attack the previous year.

Six other city officers have been killed in the line of duty since 2000. Officer Crystal D. Sheffield, the first female officer killed on the force, was fatally injured in a car crash in August 2002 while responding to a call to help a colleague. In 2001, a police officer was shot to death; and in 2000, four officers were killed in three separate collisions involving police cruisers.

The commissioner said Winder was shot because police officers are the only people criminals fear. "They don't worry about what happens to them after they get arrested," Clark said.

Bennett has been arrested 12 times, according to a criminal record obtained from police. The charges, which date to 1987, include handgun and drug offenses. He was convicted in 1994 of armed robbery and received a 15-year sentence with all but eight years suspended, police said. Bennett was paroled before serving his full sentence.

Less than five years after the crime, he was arrested on another charge, police said.

Clark said yesterday that Bennett is considered "armed and dangerous."

Gaines, of the 800 block of N. Monroe St., has been arrested at least four times, according to police. Three times in the past 12 years he has been convicted of drug charges, they said.

"I just don't understand what's wrong with these people," McKnight said yesterday, adding that Winder "was just out here to try to help people."

`Tremendous void'

Yesterday evening, police barred traffic from the eastbound lanes of Edmondson Avenue between Swann Avenue and Old Frederick Road as Winder's colleagues held a candlelight vigil at the site of the shooting.

"This is our opportunity to be the kind of officer that Brian was," said Maj. Deborah Owens, commander of the Southwestern District. "He would want us to go on."

The vigil lasted about an hour, and dozens of Winder's colleagues turned out to remember him. They praised him as a compassionate officer who played the role of stern disciplinarian and caring social worker.

"That's a special combination," said Northwestern District Deputy Maj. Mary Eilerman, who had worked with Winder at Southwestern. "His loss leaves us with a tremendous void. He always took exceptional steps to show the compassion he had. He took extra time to listen to people and get to know them."

Officer Tomecha Johnson, who was one of the first to arrive at the shooting scene Saturday, sobbed as she begged fellow officers to find Winder's killer.

"I held him in my arms," she said of Winder. "Please catch [the killer]. He has to be brought to justice. Please just catch him. That's all I want."

Sun staff writers Lynn Anderson and Kelly Brewington contributed to this article.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Lanahan

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BARRY WINSTON WOOD
3-E: 21
End of Watch: November 4, 1998
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.
On this day in Baltimore Police History 1998 we lost our brother Flight Officer Barry Winston Wood to a flight accident based on the following:

All too often police officers face life of death situations alone. During a typical tour of duty, and they run after dangerous criminals, confront armed people in the dark, deserted alleys, and pray for fellow officers to arrive during those difficult moments. Police officers claimed the Arching Angel Michael as their patron saint, and in Baltimore the sound of the beating blades of a helicopter they call Foxtrot represents the closest manifestation to a guardian angel, an unequalled source of comfort as it tracks criminals from the sky.

When an officer needed a reliable protector, Flight Officer Barry Wood always did his utmost to provide that assistance. That the beam of his powerful searchlight brought daylight into darkness. His soothing voice, hallmark of the fox trot crew, removed allayed the fears of officers on foot. As flight officer wood patrol the skies over this city, he never took lightly the duty of watching over the neighborhood below as his aircraft, but he also knew that he and his crew had a still higher mission: to safeguard the city’s protectors.

On 4 November 1998 as Baltimore mourned the loss of Officer Harold Carey and hundreds of highly polished police cars formed a long procession that would lay him to rest, Barry Wood took to the skies over Pratt Street to answer another call for help. Minutes later, trainees directing traffic listened in disbelief as their radios crackled:

“Signal 13, a Signal 13, 1050 a RED, Foxtrot has Gone Down.” The wail of sirens pierced the crisp morning air, and officers raced to help, what had begun as a routine for call for assistance over Pratt Street ended with engine failure and a catastrophe. An attempt to land his aircraft with a maneuver called “autorotation”, Barry tried to touch down in the B&O Railroad Museum Parking Lot. Foxtrots tail rotor apparently struck either a power line, or a tree which changed the altitude helicopter and drove it into the ground, killing one of Baltimore’s finest. Though severely injured, Barry’s partner and aerial observer Mark Keller would survive the crash, most credit Barry with Mark’s survival, I am sure Mark leads the group of those that praise Barry in saving his life.

When the time came to lay Barry to rest, helicopters from many different agencies flew overhead in tribute as an officer below saluted his flag draped coffin. In the background, a speaker broadcast the dispatcher’s last call for him, “KGA to Foxtrot - KGA to Foxtrot - Foxtrot 10-5 not acknowledging.” The loss of flight officer wood profoundly affected every officer in the Baltimore Police Department because the Foxtrot fleet remained grounded during the extensive follow-up investigation, leaving Baltimore City’s Police Officers to face danger zone until a new fleet of aircraft arrived and resume the role of guardian angels.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, His service Honored the City of Baltimore, and the Baltimore Police Department may he rest in peace, and may God bless him.

Flight Officer Barry Wood was killed in a helicopter crash. Flight Officer Wood experienced a catastrophic engine failure while answering a call for service over Pratt Street. Because of this mechanical failure, Flight Officer Wood attempted to land the aircraft with a technique called auto-rotation. It is speculated that Flight Officer Wood was attempting to touch down in the B & O Railroad parking lot when his tail rotor struck either power lines or a tree. This collision with a fixed object created a change in attitude driving the aircraft into the ground. Flight Officer Barry Wood’s partner, Aerial Observer Mark Keller survived the crash.

January 31, 1986 Flight Officer Barry Wood was in command of the "Foxtrot" helicopter on routine patrol over the city and developed a mechanical problem with the airship. His vast knowledge of helicopters and in the interest of the safety of his observer and those on the ground below, he searched for the closest area to land. Looking down he saw a clear spot on Frankford Ave between Moriva Park Primary and the Frankford Elementary Schools. He double checked the area for any persons on the ground and for any hazards that could affect the landing. He notified the Communications Division about the need to bring the helicopter down (10-50 Red). Communications Division immediately notified ground units to respond and secure the area along with notifications to the Fire Department to be on scene if needed. Officer Wood brought the helicopter down safely without any injuries or damage to the helicopter. He remained a true hero as not only did he concern himself more with those on the ground and the observer with him, he also kept the one thing on his mind that was the only reason he did anything, his wife, he was concerned with getting home to her, and he did, the next he was back in the air, because nothing scared him away from fulfilling the oath he made to protect the citizens on Baltimore and nothing could keep him out of the air or from doing his job. 

On this day in 1998, twelve years later, he developed another mechanical problem this one more severe than the last, one of the department's helicopter took his life. As in the earlier incident, using his experience and training he tried to bring the airship down without any injury to the persons on the ground or to his observer. He was able to bring the helicopter down on a clear lot, positioning the helicopter to land with impact on his side so as not to injure the observer too severely. The observer sustained some major injuries, possible lifelong injuries, but not life threatening injuries, Barry did all he could to see to that. So on this day 15 years ago today, we in the Baltimore Police department lost one of our very best.

The following are just a few of the reports from the Sun papers

Police pilot gets hero's farewell; Officer Barry Wood 2nd member of force to die in 5 days
An article Nov. 11 about the funeral of Officer Barry W. Wood, who was killed in a helicopter crash at the B&O Railroad Museum, reported that in 1970 during the Vietnam War, Wood had declared safe a helicopter that later crashed and killed two of his friends. In fact, Woods had declared the helicopter unsafe.
Vietnam veteran Wood joined police force to fly; Officers remember fallen colleague
Barry W. Wood didn't join the Baltimore Police Department to cruise city streets. He joined to fly over them. Coming straight from the battlefields of Vietnam, the then 23- year-old came to Baltimore less than a month after he was honorably discharged from the Army in 1971 -- part of a bold experiment for building a police helicopter unit. "When we started, we said, `Why not get the best pilots available?' " said Frederick Police Chief Regis Raffensberger, who started the city chopper unit known as "Foxtrot" and made Wood one of his first hires.

Crash kills pilot of city police helicopter; Second officer aboard seriously injured as unit chased stolen car
A Baltimore police officer was killed and his partner was seriously injured yesterday when their helicopter crashed at the B&O Railroad Museum after nearly clipping the dome of the historic roundhouse while searching for a stolen car. The pilot, Barry W. Wood, 50, is the second city officer to die in five days. The crash occurred as the funeral for Harold J. Carey ended, sending officers dressed for a burial racing from a cemetery to the wreckage on West Pratt Street. Wood, a 27-year veteran who flew a helicopter during the Vietnam War, was rushed to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Dr. Thomas M. Scalea, chief of trauma surgery, said Wood's heart and lungs had stopped, but doctors were able to resuscitate him.
Funeral planned for police pilot who died in crash
A section of Harford Road will be closed from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow for the funeral of Flight Officer Barry W. Wood, a helicopter pilot who died when his aircraft crashed Wednesday, a Baltimore Police Department spokeswoman said yesterday.

Further reports said:
November 4,1998 a Baltimore Police helicopter piloted by Flight Officer Barry W. Wood experienced mechanical problems while chasing down a car thief, and crashed into the parking lot at the B&O Railroad Museum on West Pratt St. According to witnesses, a loud bang came from the helicopter and plumes of smoke were seen pouring out the back. Remaining calm and courageous until the end, Officer Wood dispatched a distress signal over his radio, declaring "10-50 RED, 10-50 RED" which indicates that a crash is imminent. Then, the former Vietnam War Pilot, did all he could to maneuver his aircraft away from people on the ground. There were more than 60 people inside the museum at the time of the crash. A ten year old boy playing near the accident site said, “It was coming down with smoke. When I saw it hit the gate, I ran because I was so scared." Fortunately no one on the ground was hurt. On the way down, the helicopter struck a light pole and then crashed through an iron fence in the museum parking lot before coming to a rest on its side. The cockpit was destroyed. The two Officers were immediately removed from the helicopter and rushed to Shock Trauma Center. Flight Officer Wood, 50, made it into surgery, but was pronounced dead at 5 p.m., less than three hours after the accident. Officer Keller, 43, suffered a number of serious injuries, including a broken elbow and a spinal fracture, but survived the accident. At the funeral Barry was compared to "David, the Warrior," a Biblical figure who was renowned for the love, compassion and strength of character he exemplified. Officer Wood's wife of 28 years, Martha, spoke eloquently and powerfully at the funeral. She praised her husband as a great planner and excellent provider, and talked about the special relationship they had. "No one on earth has ever experienced the love that Barry and I shared. He was a loving, caring man who touched everyone that he came in contact with" Officer Keller expressed great admiration for his partner of more than a year and a half when he said, "Barry laid down his life for a friend. Our family will always love him and so will I." Officer Barry Wood's Service, Dedication to Duty, and Compassion Honored the City of Baltimore and the Police Department
A Man Who Loved To Fly
 If your thoughts go to him and they go sad
Just remember this,
He has no barriers anymore,
For now the clouds aren’t closed doors.
He has no limits
It does not matter how high he flies.
The Good Lord has set him free.
And remember this, if it is a shooting star you see,
Think of him and you will know
That his heart and soul will never die,
For he now lives in the sky,
What a wondrous thing for a man who loved to fly.

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WILLIAM J WOODCOCK
18-E: 9
End of Watch: June 13, 1943
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1943 we lost our Brother Police Officer William Woodcock, as he was beat with his own Espantoon, and punched, stomped and kicked while he lay unconscious on the ground, based on the following.

On June 12, 1943 at approximately 10:37 p.m., Officer Woodcock responded to 1004 Brentwood Avenue to investigate an assault or threat thereof. During the investigation, Officer Woodcock took the suspect into custody and was responding to the victim’s house when the suspect Ronald Harris attacked the officer, taking his Espantoon and using it to knock Officer Woodcock unconscious, still while on the ground the officer was kicked, punched and stomped. Some witnesses say, Harris had three friend join him in the beating.

Witnesses said, Harris (39) first struck Officer Woodcock in the face, and knocked him to the ground, he then used Officer Woodcock’s espantoon against him. In fact, Officer Woodcock was taken to the ER where he later died, I tend to think he may have told investigators he was struck with his stick, as we know he came to and gave a statement to Captain Joseph Itzel, in which he gave an account of events to the Captain while naming suspect Harris. Others say Harris was joined by three of his friends who also took part in beating Officer Woodcock in about the head, while kicking and punching him as he lay unconscious and defenseless on the ground. From the newspaper – “Reports say Officer Woodcock regained consciousness at the hospital just long enough to identify one of suspects to Captain Joseph Itzel. Identified was Ronald Harris, 39 at the time was held without bail for grand jury action on a charge of murdering Patrolman William J. Woodcock.” This verse from the papers using the quote “long enough to identify one of suspects” let us know there was more than one suspect. That is all dropped as the case goes on. A hearing was held before magistrate Elmer J. Hammer in Central Police Court. Harris was held in $1,000 bail on each of two charges of assaulting two men who lived near his home in the 400 block East Eager Street. The assault charges were brought by John J. Mulgrew, of the 1000 block Brentwood Avenue, and Salvalor Costa, of the 600 block East Eager Street.

Arrested On June 12, Harris was on the front steps of his home about 9.30 P. M. His Attorneys were James E. Tippett, and Bernard S. Melnicove, who asked for a jury trial on the assault charges, didn’t really need a trail, there are three attorneys in a courtroom, aside from the Prosecuting attorney, and the Defense Attorney, there is the Judge, he is supposed to be impartial but this judge (Eugene O’Dunne) was pro-defense, he already had a disliking for police, and what he believed to be, “a willingness to use their Espantoon”, or as he said to “over use it”, so of all cases he to make a point, O’Dunne, picked this one. To make his point, he let a Police Killer go free, a case of an officer killed in the line of duty, would make headlines and get his point across… 5 Oct 1943, Judge Eugene O'Dunne acquitted Ronald Harris, the so called "maniac bandit," of a charge of Murdering Patrolman William J. Woodcock, holding that Woodcock's attempt to arrest Harris was illegal, and that the defendant did not use “unreasonable” force to repel the arrest. Judge O'Dunne contended that the officer attempted to arrest Harris without a warrant for a mere misdemeanor, which he did not see (i.e. not committed in his presence) was illegal. He pointed out the attempted arrest was based on the complaint of a mother who was not the victim, reported Harris threatened to beat her son. NOTE: If Harris would have admitted to this misdemeanor to Officer Woodcock, the arrest would have been legal, and his resisting wouldn’t have been justified. That said, the judge in this case was still wrong, because the resisting should have only been enough to escape the said “false” arrest, once free he should have gone, but by coming back, or continuing the assault, he was like an officer that uses excessive force, (the judge even eluded to it when he said, “the defendant did not use “unreasonable” force to repel the arrest” But he did, Woodcock made a statement, he told who his killer was, and that while, “down he was hit, kicked and stomped” by the defendant and three of the defendant’s friends. We already know he is guilty of a crime if more force is used than is needed, and if that crime leads to death, he should have been found guilty of at the very least manslaughter. I have read a lot of the judge’s words, and it was obvious he was not a fan of police, and it seems he used his powers, and dislike to free a POS, Police Killer.

The day after being acquitted Harris was arrested for drunk and disorderly. When taken before an afternoon judge, (he was still too drunk for morning sessions) he was asked by the judge if he had ever been arrested for drunk and disorderly, he answered, “I don’t think so?” so he was fined and given no jail time. In December (the 11th 1943) he was involved in a fight where he would be arrested and charged with assault, the courts again were lenient giving him just 60 days. In March of 1944 Harris was arrested with three friends for Theft and Burglary charges Harris wasn’t in court as he was too ill, so he was taken to the hospital, but his partners were sentenced to 4 and 5 years for their part in the crimes. Those arrested were Vince Bateman 21, Withrow Thompson 22, Joe Williams 25… All three signed affidavits saying they refused to assist Harris on a Robbery scheme he cooked up for an area Tavern Owner, that was crippled, Harris called all three, “Chicken Hearted” and told them, “when you go in to rob a man, rob him, and get it over quick!” a soldier who was AWOL was also arrested with Harris, but he was turned over to the military (He is probably getting out of the brig sometime within the next few years)

March 1944 Harris accused of theft of auto twice, the first February 24th and then again on the 28th these would be two auto theft charges, they stole a third from reliable Motors on the 27th of February Ronald Harris was sentenced last night to ten years in the Penitentiary after his conviction by a Criminal Court jury· on charges of larceny, receiving stolen goods and unauthorized use of an automobile. "Your record is extremely bad. Superlatives hardly describe it, "Judge .John T Tucker told the 40-year-old defendant in imposing sentence. "As soon as you get out of one difficulty, it seems you are in another." Convicted On Four Counts Judge Tucker imposed four-yearterms on each of two automobile larceny charges, and one-year terms on charges of receiving stolen goods and unauthorized use of an automobile. The sentences are to be served consecutively. Three other men indicted jointly with Harris on one or more of the charges received sentences ranging from four to five years when tried before Judge Tucker several Weeks ago. They were. Vincent Bateman and Withrow F. Thompson, each 1 given five years, and Joseph F. Williams, who received a four-year I term. According to statements by Joseph G. Finnerty, Assistant State's Attorney, Harris was the "ring leader" of a gang which rode the streets of Baltimore in stolen automobiles seeking places to "slick up." Began Operations In February the evidence disclosed that the defendants began operations last February 20 when Thompson stole the automobile of Robert Farnell Jr., of the 5400 block Jonquil Avenue, parked it on a side street in Westport and then joined the others in a
West Fayette street tavern
Their witnesses said, Harris told them of a man in the tavern who had $500, describing the owner of the money as a "good man to roll." Harris added that an automobile would be necessary before the robbery could be committed, and Thompson then informed the group of the stolen car in Westport and they went there by taxicab to get it, it was testified. When they returned to the tavern, the man had left. So the group rode around the city and nearby counties looking for places to stage holdups, the court and jury were told.
Cars Recovered
Famell's car was recovered on February 26, but prior to that time the gang had gone to a lot in the rear or the 300 block Monastery Avenue and stolen the high powered automobile of Newton Dale Johnson, the evidence disclosed. Witnesses said Mr. Johnson's automobile was recovered on February 27 from a location where it had been parked by the defendants, but the next day they’re turned to the lot and again stole Johnson's automobile. Mr. Finnerty contended they wanted the car because of its' high speed. Harris also was convicted of receiving property stolen from the third-floor apartment of Randolph Hoffman and his wife in the 200 block North Greene street. Criminal Record Read Mr." Finnerty read Harris' criminal record to the court. It follows:

1918- One year In St. Mary's Induatrial School for Larceny.

1923- Nine months in Wilmington, Del., for breaking and entering.

1923- Slx months for receiving stolen goods

1924- Three years on six burglary charges

1925 - Committed to Spring Grove State Hospital

1925- Escaped Spring Grove State Hospital

1925- Ten years for shooting at four policeman, burglary, assault and

robbery, larceny and receiving stolen goods

1925- Committed to Spring Grove State Hospital

1925- Escaped Spring Grove State Hospital (Apprehended In South Carolina.)

1928- Committed to Spring Grove State Hospital where he remained until 1933

1934- Two, to five years In Philadelphia for breaking and entering.

1938- $25 and costs for assault.

1940-Suspended sentence for assault.

1940-Elghteen months on two assault charges.

1942-Elghteen months for assault and robbery.

1943- Slxty days for disorderly conduct and assault.

1943 - September, Judge Eugene O’Dunne acquitted Harris of a charge of murdering a policeman after ruling that Harris was justified in resisting arrest because the arrest was illegal. What a sick son of a bitch and worthless judge. He went on to make a statement during another trial to try to explain his verdict, it came across as liberal judge with a disliking for police that wanted to make a statement. Judge O'Dunne, in the course of his statement, mentioned his recent acquittal of Ronald Harris, charged with the murder of a policeman, on the ground that the defendant had been justified in resisting arrest because the arrest was unlawful. The case attracted widespread public interest. "May I take advantage of this occasion," the jurist said yesterday, "to say a few words. "Baltimore has just cause to be proud of its Police Department. It is headed by Commissioner Hamilton R. Atkinson, a man risen from the ranks to the head of the department a man beloved by his force and enjoying the confidence and respect of the community.
Puts Them In Two Classes

"I would like the commissioner and the Police Department as a whole to feel that the Criminal Court is disposed to stand behind the department in the just enforcement of law and order, and to compel respect for its members as the representatives of law and order and to promote a feeling that the uniform is a badge of authority and entitled to be respected, and its officers obeyed - when acting within their legal rights. "I am equally anxious to have them know and realize , that the courts will not protect them in illegal arrests, begotten either of ignorance or arrogance; nor will it tolerate them building up a case in court to warrant their illegal action, by the use or false and perjured testimony” Judge O'Dunne stated that from his experience he has observed that police officers fall into two classes. 1 'They are, "Those who are conscious of their power and of its corresponding responsibility; men who are self-poised, self-restrained and disposed to be firm but polite in the exercise of official duty.
His Second Type

"The other class of policemen may be described as those conscientious in the discharge or duty, zealous in its performance, anxious to make arrests on all possible occasions, ignorant of the law of when arrests may be legally made

without a warrant, fresh and arrogant in the exercise of their authority; utterly oblivious as to what constitutes a disturbance of the peace; men who regard themselves as the public peace, and in their minds, any disturbance of the police, or any question of their authority, is in itself, a crime-the “I am the law” type. "What they call 'back talk,' to such an officer, warrants slapping them in the face, white or colored. They feel free themselves to use any kind of opprobrious language to the victim, and goad him into loss of temper, then they assault or arrest him without warrant of law, and charge him with assault on an officer at the slightest resistance and then come to court and lie out of the facts so as to justify their conduct.

Mullin Case Ruling ·

"There. are comparatively few men on the police force, even from the higher rank down, who know what constitute: disturbing the public peace. They fail to put

the accent on public. Too many are infused with the idea that cursing the police under any circumstance, at any time or place, is not only a greater sin than cursing God, but mounts up to a public crime." Judge O'Dunne ruled that in arresting Mullin on the complaint or his wife and in her presence, the police were acting within their authority. He said that any beating which Mullin received at the hands of the police was provoked by the defendant because of his strenuous resistance.

Still he let a killer go free, because as he said in another statement

Judge Eugene O'Dunne yesterday acquitted Ronald Harris, so called "maniac bandit," of a charge of murdering Patrolman William J. Woodcock, 'holding that Woodcock's attempt to arrest Harris was illegal and that the defendant did not use unreasonable force to repel the· arrest Judge O'Dunne contended that the officer attempted to arrest Harris 'without a warrant for a mere misdemeanor which he did not see. He pointed out the attempted arrest was based on the complaint of a mother who reported Harris threatened to beat her son.

We all saw Harris’ record, and know he was arrested at least four times within the year after being released of Killing Officer Woodcock, the last case of robberies, theft’s etc. he was given 10 years. I was unable to find anything further. Some record indicate he may have gone back into Spring Grove State Hospital, but it is unclear if it is the same Ronald Harris.

Officer Woodcock is no longer with us, but he will never be forgotten. May he rest in Peace, and May God Bless Him.


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GEORGE WORKNER
33-W: 24
End of Watch: March 15, 1808
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

On this day in Baltimore Police History 1808 we lost our brother Night Watchman George Workner – Ofc. Workner was stabbed to death during a jail break of nine inmates from the Baltimore Jail. The inmates made a set of keys and picked the locks to their cell doors. Then they attacked the guards with a small knife one of the inmates had obtained. Watchman Workner was stabbed in the side during the escape and died from the wound the following day. Four of the nine inmates were apprehended and sentenced to death for Watchman Workner's murder. Their execution date was set for April 22, 1808, but they again attempted to escape two days beforehand. That escape attempt failed and they were hung in the jail's courtyard at noon on April 22, 1808

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten – RIP Officer George Workner


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JACOB ZAPP
18-W: 8
End of Watch: July 15, 1891
Baltimore City, Maryland, P.D.

Police  Officer Jacob Zapp Baltimore City Police Department EOW:  Wednesday, July 15, 1891 Cause: Struck by train

On this day in Baltimore City Police History 1891, we lost our brother Police  Officer Jacob Zapp of the Southern District when he was struck a Baltimore and Ohio locomotive on Ostend Street near China Street in South Baltimore killing him instantly, . The officer was walking near the track during a thunderstorm and stepped across the rails to avoid a puddle of water.   Locomotive 634 was backing down the track. The rush of rain and the thunder prevented the patrolman from hearing the locomotive, and as his head was bowed to avoid the downpour he did not see it approaching until the locomotive was close to him. Then he raised his hand instinctively as if to stop the locomotive.   That was the last of him. Witnesses of the accident ran to the spot where it had occurred and were horrified at what they saw. The body had been so mangled that the remains were gathered together, could all be put in a two-foot soapbox and a cigar box. Patrolman Zapp was fifty-seven years of age and had been on the force since August 27, 1872.

We his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department will not let him be forgotten. God Bless, and rest in Peace. His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department - RIP Officer Zapp.

 
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Officer Charles R. Ernest
01/20/1965 

On this day in Baltimore Police History 20 January 1965, we lost our Brother Police Officer Charles R. Ernest to a pedestrian related auto accident based on the following -

At the intersection of Pearl and Saratoga St., Mr. Ferman Simmon and Mr. Louis Owen’s were involved in a minor traffic accident. Mr. Simmon was sitting in traffic when he was struck from behind. Mr. Owens had failed to stop for a stop sign, (he was driving a 1959 Chevy) when he slammed into the rear of Mr. Simmon’s 1953 Ford. Even though their cars were operable the two drivers failed to remove their cars from the street causing a traffic back-up.

It was approx. 11:15am on the morning of June 13, 1964. Patrolman Ernest and his partner Officer Joseph Keirle arrived to handle what in terms of Baltimore City Police Department’s calls, would be considered as “routine”. More modern times it would be a Sig 30. Patrolman Ernest examined the licenses, and other paperwork that Mr. Simmons and Mr. Owens had provided, while he and Mr. Simmons stood at the rear of the heavily damaged 53 Ford owned by Mr. Simmons, and the incident was being investigated. Mr. Owens was told to back his car away so Officer Keirle could better direct traffic around the scene and free up some of the traffic from the intersection. Mr. Owens jumped in behind the steering wheel, started the engine, and nervously put the car in the gear, as most people are around Police, Owens was nervous, his anxiety as it was, he did not get the car into reverse, but instead found drive, as he let up off the clutch while peering through the back window, his car lunged forward, he quickly went to push the brake, but again his nerves got the best of him, and he pushed the pedal to the floor… had it been the brake, he may have saved a life, but as it was the gas, and instead of saving a life, he crushed the hips of two men between the cars.

Mr. Fermon Simmons and Officer Charles Ernest were powerless to stop the two vehicles from crushing them between the two, and in an instant the pair were pinned between the cars. Mr. Owens immediately switched the car from 1st gear to reverse and backed his car away; but it was too late, the damage had already been done. When released from the massive trap of mangled steel and chrome, Patrolman Charles R Ernest could do nothing but fall to the ground in a horrific, and unbearable pain.

The collision had shattered the hips, pelvis and entire lower spine of both men. Patrolman Keirle immediately called for an ambulance and did his best to comfort his partner. The crew of Medic #1 (Ambulance #1) rushed to the scene and took the two men to University Hospital.

The hospital summoned Dr. John A. O’Conner, the official Departmental Doctor, to care for Officer Ernest. After a week in the hospital, and several surgeries, Doctor O’Connor determined Officer Ernest would need long-term care, and assigned Dr. Edward Wenzlaff as his primary doctor. When the immediate danger to his health had passed, Officer Ernest was taken from the hospital to his home with hopes of a full recovery.

At home with his wife Dorothy, and daughter, Mary were caring for him constantly; he seemed to be doing better. There was never a shortage of visitors. Unfortunately, things took a turn for the worse, and hopes would soon wane as there was a steady decline in his condition.

Though he had the benefits of the assigned physician to care for him, he did not progress the way Dr O'Conner had originally hoped he would. On January 20, 1965, after multiple surgeries, numerous therapies and 221 days of bed rest at his home, Officer Charles R Ernest would suffer a severe heart attack and die, all as a result of the initial injuries.

Officer Charles R. Ernest served the department for 18 years and one month, he was a well-respected Police Officer. During World War II he was a Sergeant in the Armory and faced the dangers of combat for little more than two years. In Baltimore he spent almost half his life in the Western District facing its dangers every day. In 1960, he was awarded the Silver Star after confronting an armed suspect and trading shots with him. A brave officer, he was, never cavalier about dangerous situations, ironically it was his keen sense of area awareness that kept him safe, a sense of awareness that was caught off guard by the usual routineness of a call like this. He could have never suspected that call for a simple traffic accident would take his life. Which went on to teach future generations of police that there is no such thing as a routine call.

As his brothers and sisters of the Baltimore Police Department we will not let him be forgotten, and we will take this time to remember him, think of him and thank him for his service and sacrifice.


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Officer Gerald M. Armiger

06/24/1994

Officer Gerald M. Arminger had a heart attack in the Southeastern District’s locker room while on duty.


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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

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