Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; Color has a deprecated constructor in /home/bcph911/public_html/Dec-2017/templates/dream/features/color.php on line 11
NYPD Lieutenant Samuel Battle

Pin It

EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Baltimore City Police History

Sam Battle NYPD Trained BPD 1912Lieutenant Samuel Battle, NYPD

How a New York City Police Lieutenant
Helped Integrate the Baltimore Police Department

In 1912, Samuel Battle was the First African American appointed to the NYPD. He rose to the rank of Lieutenant. Meanwhile, in Baltimore, African Americans had been pressuring Maryland Governor Harry Nice, Baltimore Mayor Howard Jackson, the Maryland General Assembly and the Baltimore City Council to hire black police officers. The effort was led by a Baltimore Real Estate Broker named Marse Colloway. Calloway had started a police training school to prepare African Americans to take the Civil Service Examination to be a Police Officer. Black leaders scheduled a rally at the Bethel AME Church (^) on Druid Hill Ave. They invited Governor Nice and Lt. Battle to speak. Battle, with permission from the NYPD, traveled to Baltimore to speak at the rally. Governor Nice, Mayor Jackson and Marse Calloway were in attendance with 1,500 people. When Governor Nice entered, Lt. Battle rose to give up his seat. Calloway said "Don't move, Lieutenant Battle, you are a gust speaker. The governor is only incidental. Let him sit to your left." Lieutenant Battle gave a rousing and moving speech and rallied the crowd who all signed a petition to have the BPD hire African American officers. The petition was presented to the governor, the mayor and the police commissioner. Marse Battle recalled "The very next day, several Negros took the examination for the police force and it was no too long before Negros were hired.

1 black devider 800 8 72

samuel j Samuel J. Battle

New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina, USA
DEATH - 6 Aug 1966 (Age 83) New York County (Manhattan), New York, NY
BURIAL - Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum - HartsdaleWestchester CountyNew YorkNY
MEMORIAL ID - 148450508 

First African-American appointed to the NYC Police Department on June 28, 1911. Promoted to Sergeant (1926) and later rose to the rank of Lieutenant (1935). Appointed NYC Parole Commissioner by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia in 1941 to fill the vacancy on the Parole Board as a result of the death of Lou Gehrig. He held the position for ten years before retiring.  In 1949 Battle engaged poet Langston Hughes to write his biography. Although never published, the manuscript still exists and is now the basis of a 2015 book by Arthur Browne, entitled, "One Righteous Man: Samuel Battle and the Shattering of the Color Line in New York." Mr. Battle was a close acquaintance of James Williams, father of Wesley Williams who broke through the color barrier in the NYC Fire Department. Although not the first African-American appointed, he was the first to be promoted to Lieutenant and was the "first" in each of his subsequent ranks of Captain and Battalion Chief. His story was chronicled, also in a 2015 book, entitled "Fire-Fight" by Ginger Adams Otis (who like Browne, was a NY Daily News reporter.)
1 black devider 800 8 72

1911 - First African-American Police Officer in New York City: Samuel J. Battle, following the 1898 incorporation of the five boroughs into the City of New York, and the hiring of three African-American officers in the Brooklyn Police Department. Samuel Battle was also the NYPD's first African-American Sergeant (1926), Lieutenant (1935), and Parole Commissioner (1941). 

1 black devider 800 8 72

The Story of New York’s First Black Police Officer, Told With the Help of Langston Hughes Samuel J. Battle in 1941.

It is odd that Samuel J. Battle, the first black officer in the New York Police Department, is not a larger part of our city’s lore. He was a giant man — 6-foot-3 and nearly 300 pounds — who more than 100 years ago led the integration of the department, then essentially an Irish-American enclave.

Mr. Battle’s arc from humble Southern roots through racist barriers in New York would be a familiar story, like the stories of other black pioneers. But he was largely forgotten until a veteran New York journalist followed a trail that led to a remarkable discovery.

On a summer day in 2009, Arthur Browne, a broad and thick-handed man himself with closely cut silver hair, was reading his newspaper when he came across an article that surprised him. The city was naming a Harlem intersection after Mr. Battle, whom the article called “the Jackie Robinson of the N.Y.P.D.” Mr. Browne, who had expertly covered the city in one way or another for 40 years, realized that he had never thought about how the Police Department was first integrated.

“It struck me as a lapse because there was so much controversy through the years about the Police Department’s relationship with the black community, and over the number of African-Americans on the force,” he said recently in his office at The Daily News, where he is now the editorial page editor. “It just struck me that I never thought about how it all began.” So he started digging.

Eventually, Mr. Browne located and called Tony Cherot, Mr. Battle’s grandson, who was living in California, and Mr. Cherot made a revelation. Did Mr. Browne know that his grandfather had hired Langston Hughes to write his biography, and that he had the manuscript?

“I was just blown away at the thought of it,” Mr. Browne said.

And Mr. Battle resurfaced, that much larger with his newly discovered connection to the Harlem Renaissance poet.

Mr. Browne’s coming book, “One Righteous Man: Samuel Battle and the Shattering of the Color Line in New York,” based on Hughes’s manuscript and Mr. Browne’s archival research, serves as a tribute to Mr. Battle’s wish to leave a legacy that would outlive his death.

In 1949, at the twilight of his career and at the eve of the civil rights movement, Mr. Battle was a man who knew what he had accomplished, and he hired Hughes in the hope that the acclaimed writer would tell his story. The son of former slaves from North Carolina, Mr. Battle entered the department at 28 years old in 1911, following intense lobbying by Harlem’s elite ministers and newspaper editors, who saw integration as a remedy for police violence against blacks.

Arthur Browne in front of Samuel Battle’s home in the Strivers’ Row section of Harlem.

Mr. Battle braved years of harassment and worked his way up to lieutenant. He left the force when Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia named him the first black member of the New York City Parole Commission in 1941. Mr. Battle served on the commission for 10 years, retiring in 1951.

Mr. Battle shared his memories with Hughes in a series of recorded interviews. But Hughes did not take the job seriously; with his sights set on more glamorous endeavors, he did little more than transcribe the recordings.

Mr. Cherot, 74, who was present for some of the interviews, said of his grandfather, “He had invested what he thought was important money so Langston would do Langston,” adding: “Langston didn’t do that. Langston actually quit on him. So he was disappointed.”

Poring over the old manuscript, Mr. Browne, 64, came to have great affection for Mr. Battle. “Once I came to grips with the history and to see where he fit,” he said, “I really believe he was a great man, and I had an obligation to tell that story.”

Mr. Browne joined The Daily News in the mid-1970s, during the glory years of splashy New York tabloid journalism — the era of Son of Sam; the 1977 New York City blackout; the Bushwick riots. Mr. Browne’s colleagues from that time recall him as a relentless and competitive reporter, very serious but with a sense of amusement about the comedy and tragedy that happened around him.

“Back in those days, when we worked at night, I would stop and marvel at him,” said Martin Gottlieb, then his colleague at The News and now the editor of The Record of New Jersey. One memory stuck out.

“There were two or three guys that may have been involved in a burglary or something in South Ozone Park,” Mr. Gottlieb said. “The guys jump a fence and wind up on Aqueduct racetrack and are running on the track. Arthur jumps over the fence and chases them around the track. We could listen to this in the office over the police radio, and it was bizarre.”

But Mr. Browne also developed the reputation of being not just tough but abrasive. He acknowledged that it had some basis. “I have confessed to a certain lack of emotional intelligence that led me not to understand the things that I was saying, doing or writing, that anyone would take offense at it or be upset about it,” he said.

His colleagues say Mr. Browne developed an encyclopedic knowledge of the city, covering City Hall at the end of Mayor Abraham D. Beame’s tenure and the start of Edward I. Koch’s, and working as an investigative reporter and later as a manager and editorial writer. In 2007, he was among writers at the paper awarded the Pulitzer Prize for editorials on behalf of ground zero workers whose health problems were neglected by the city and the country.

Langston Hughes, standing, with Mr. Battle, in an undated photo. Mr. Battle hired the poet to write his biography in 1949.

Credit Griffith J. Davis

“I used to think of The Daily News as the old New York cabby who would start talking to you,” said Joel Siegel, managing editor of NY1, the television news station, who worked with Mr. Browne at The News. “Somebody who was a little bit weary, but streetwise and smart, and he would tell it to you straight. Whatever the DNA is of The Daily News, he has it. There are other people who may have acquired it, but he has it.”

Mr. Browne came from a primarily Irish-American family with deep connections at the paper, which in those days, like the Police Department, was dominated by Irish-Americans. By family lore, his grandfather was one of the paper’s first employees, and aunts and uncles followed, as did his father. Mr. Browne got his first job there as a copy boy through a man his father knew.

“I did not realize when I was an early reporter at the paper what the race issues were,” Mr. Browne said. “I didn’t have a sense that this newspaper or any of the others were not well serving New York’s black community. Nor did I have any sense that the paper I was working for or any of the other papers had a terrible record on hiring black reporters, journalists, copy editors. It didn’t seem to be an issue. That’s the blindness.”

He had grown up in Freeport, a village on Long Island that he remembered as deeply segregated. “The east side of Main Street was black,” he said. “The west side of Main Street was white. And never were you supposed to cross. I grew up in a society where racism was openly expressed.”

“Not in my house,” Mr. Browne added. “And I don’t know why. My mother in particular was very, very strict about how you thought about people and how you spoke about people. But still, that was the world that I grew up in.”

Soon after he joined The News, a group of black journalists sued the paper for discrimination, a case they eventually won. “It was an awakening moment for everybody,” Mr. Browne said.

Mr. Cherot, Mr. Battle’s grandson, was surprised that a white person wanted to tell the story. “I scratched my head a little bit that he was interested, but after our discussions, it was obvious to me that he was a credible, sincere man,” Mr. Cherot said. “A story doesn’t need to be told by any sort of race; it’s your commitment.”

Mr. Browne recalled his childhood as he wrote the book. “I would think about the people who all surrounded me, what their mind-set was, and know that it was the mind-set of the white society that was Battle’s,” he said. “That was kind of a filter for all of this.”

“I thought it was a real privilege to channel Sam Battle with Langston Hughes’s help,” Mr. Browne said. “There are many things that I am proud of in my career. I cannot think of something that would be a capstone that gives me more pride than this.”

Correction: 

An article last Sunday about a biography by Arthur Browne of New York City’s first black police officer, Samuel J. Battle, erroneously attributed a distinction to the blackout that Mr. Browne covered in 1977, early in his reporting career. Though it was a major blackout, it was not New York’s first such blackout. (The first major one was in 1965.)

Correction: 

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of a picture caption with this article misidentified Langston Hughes. He is standing, on the left side of the photo, not on the right.

1 black devider 800 8 72

June 28, 1911: Samuel Battle became the first black person appointed to the New York City police force.

The battle would go on to become the first black sergeant, in 1926; the 1st black lieutenant, in 1935; and the city’s 1st black parole commissioner, in 1941.

After attending segregated schools in North Carolina, Battle moved north to Connecticut, and later to New York City. He took a job as a train porter and began studying for the New York City Police Department civil service exam.

Career:
His brother-in-law was Patrolman Moses P. Cobb, who started working for the Brooklyn Police force in the early 1890s was his mentor.

In 1911, the city’s population was about 2 percent black. He joined the force and was sworn in on March 6, 1911. Battle was assigned first to San Juan Hill, the neighborhood where Lincoln Center is today, which preceded Harlem as one of the key African-American neighborhoods. He was soon moved to Harlem, as the African-American population there was growing.

“Big Sam” as he was known — 6’3, 280 pounds — earned the respect of his fellow officers after saving one officer’s life in the early 1920s. They subsequently voted to allow him into the Sergeant’s Academy.

As the NYPD’s first black Lieutenant, during the intense Harlem Riots of 1935, he circulated fliers of himself with the young boy smiling who had allegedly been murdered in the basement of the Kress Department store.

In 1941, Battle began work as a parole commissioner, working with delinquent youths in Harlem. He initiated rehabilitation programs for Harlem’s youth as well, such as summer camps and sports activities.

During a 1943 race riot, triggered by the shooting of an African-American suspect by a white police officer, Battle, at the request of New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, was called in to quell the Harlem area where the riot erupted.

Battle retired as parole commissioner in 1951 but remained active in community activities for the Harlem area.

1 black devider 800 8 72

alg battle jpgHis parents were among the last generation born into Southern slavery, and his own birth in 1883 was notable for another benchmark: At 16 pounds, he was the biggest baby ever recorded in North Carolina.

“I guess I’ve always wanted to be large, and I have been large,” Samuel Jesse Battle recalled decades later.  HERE

But his personal growth was threatened when, as a teenager, he was caught pilfering cash from a safe belonging to his boss, R. H. Smith, a landlord who predicted that within a year, the young man would be in prison.

“That was the turning point of my life,” said Battle, who avoided prosecution because the boss was a friend of his father, a Methodist minister. “I said, ‘From this day on, I shall always be honest and honorable, and I’m going to make Mr. Smith out a liar.’ ”

On June 28, 1911, a century ago Tuesday, Samuel Battle largely delivered on his resolutions. Having grown to 6-foot-3 and 285 pounds, he became the first black person appointed to the New York City police force. He would go on to become the first black sergeant, in 1926; the first black lieutenant, in 1935; and the city’s first black parole commissioner, in 1941.

In 1911, the city’s population was about 2 percent black, and a number of black officers were already on patrol in Brooklyn, including Battle’s brother-in-law and mentor, Moses Cobb, but they had been hired by the City of Brooklyn before it merged with New York in 1898. The Police Department considers Wiley G. Overton, sworn in by Brooklyn in 1891, as the city’s pioneer black officer.

But Battle was the first black person appointed to New York’s combined 10,000-member force, ranking 199th of 638 applicants on the police test. The department will mark his appointment on Tuesday during Cadet Corps graduation ceremonies.

What a difference a century makes. Today, blacks are 23 percent of the city’s population, and 18 percent of all police officers. Black, Hispanic and Asian New Yorkers make up nearly 48 percent among all ranks, and among police officers they have been a majority since 2006.

Among higher-ranking officers, promoted on the basis of competitive civil service tests, minority officers constitute 39 percent of sergeants, up from 19 percent a decade ago; 25 percent of lieutenants, up from 13 percent; and 17 percent of captains, up from 5 percent. Of the 43 blacks who have passed the test for captain since then, nearly half have been promoted to higher ranks.

Samuel Battle (he hated being called Sam; “every Tom, Dick and Harry who shines shoes, they used to call him Sam,” he said) moved to New York for good in 1901. He was hired as a houseboy at the Sagamore Hotel at Lake George — which, he recalled, did not admit Jews — and as a $32-a-month red cap at Grand Central Terminal. For most of his career, he lived in Harlem.

He considered working for the Post Office or the Customs Service, but decided on the police force because, he said, “it would be a permanent place in which I could support my wife and family without worry.”

Photo

Samuel J. Battle, shown as a lieutenant in 1941, was appointed as the first black officer in the New York Police Department a century ago Tuesday. Credit The New York Times

When he applied, Battle was rejected by police surgeons, supposedly because of a heart murmur, but he passed a medical retest after prominent blacks protested to city officials. He suffered the silent treatment from fellow officers at his West 68th Street station house. A threatening note with a racial epithet and a hole the width of a bullet was left on his bunk.

In an interview with the Columbia University Center for Oral History in 1960, six years before he died, Battle recalled that he never complained to outsiders about his treatment from co-workers. If a colleague had something against him, Battle challenged him to meet in the cellar and “take it out on my black behind.” Nobody did. His comrades were won over in 1919 when Battle dashed into a crowd of rioters at 135th Street and Lenox Avenue to rescue a white officer. “The white officers worked in an all-Negro neighborhood, practically, and they needed me as much as I needed them and sometimes more,” Battle recalled.

In 2009, when the Harlem intersection was named in Battle’s honor, the police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, said the episode “was just one example among many of why Officer Battle was so respected and admired by his colleagues.”

“In fact, just a few days after this incident,” Mr. Kelly said, “they voted unanimously to admit him to a prep course for a sergeant’s exam.”

Early in his career, Battle was pointed out by tour guides as “New York’s first colored policeman.” Later, he was banished to Brooklyn, for raiding a politically connected establishment. He served as mentor to a young patrolman, William O’Dwyer, who would become mayor.

In 1935, Battle played a pivotal role in quelling a riot in Harlem, ignited by the arrest of a 16-year-old shoplifter whom store employees subdued and released through a back door. False rumors spread that the youth had been fatally beaten. By finding the boy, having him photographed and circulating his smiling image, Battle ended the riot.

In an earlier riot on the West Side, though, when white officers were beating black rioters, Battle “got even,” he said, by “whipping white heads.”

He also participated in the 1931 opening of a Harlem station house, where the tap dancer Bill Robinson promised a gift to the officer who made the first arrest. Battle shoved Robinson aside, he recalled, “and he said something to me, and I grabbed him and took him into the station house and had him booked.” After Robinson discovered that the arrest was a prank, he gave Battle a hat as a gift anyway.

In the Columbia interview, Battle recalled that in the 1940s “there were many cases of mistreatment of the populace by the police.” He blamed prejudice on parents. “All the old ones should be dead and put in the ocean!” said Battle. who was in his mid-70s. “Then we’d have a good world to live in.”

In 1936, celebrating his 25th anniversary on the force, he said that while he could not imagine the elimination of prejudice, it seemed to be declining as blacks improved educationally and financially.

“What we want is an equal opportunity to enjoy life and to make our own way,” he said. His advice: “Make your own opportunities. When you see them, take hold of them and never give up.”

1 black devider 800 8 72
In 1911, the city’s population was about 2 percent black, and a number of black officers were already on patrol in Brooklyn, including Battle’s brother-in-law and mentor, Moses Cobb, but they had been hired by the City of Brooklyn before it merged with New York in 1898. The Police Department considers Wiley G. Overton, sworn in by Brooklyn in 1891, as the city’s pioneer black officer.

But Battle was the first black person appointed to New York’s combined 10,000-member force, ranking 199th of 638 applicants on the police test. The department will mark his appointment on Tuesday during Cadet Corps graduation ceremonies.

What a difference a century makes. Today, blacks are 23 percent of the city’s population, and 18 percent of all police officers. Black, Hispanic and Asian New Yorkers make up nearly 48 percent among all ranks, and among police officers they have been a majority since 2006.

Among higher-ranking officers, promoted on the basis of competitive civil service tests, minority officers constitute 39 percent of sergeants, up from 19 percent a decade ago; 25 percent of lieutenants, up from 13 percent; and 17 percent of captains, up from 5 percent. Of the 43 blacks who have passed the test for captain since then, nearly half have been promoted to higher ranks.

Samuel Battle (he hated being called Sam; “every Tom, Dick and Harry who shines shoes, they used to call him Sam,” he said) moved to New York for good in 1901. He was hired as a houseboy at the Sagamore Hotel at Lake George — which, he recalled, did not admit Jews — and as a $32-a-month red cap at Grand Central Terminal. For most of his career, he lived in Harlem.

He considered working for the Post Office or the Customs Service, but decided on the police force because, he said, “it would be a permanent place in which I could support my wife and family without worry.”

Samuel J. Battle, shown as a lieutenant in 1941, was appointed as the first black officer in the New York Police Department a century ago Tuesday. CreditThe New York Times

When he applied, Battle was rejected by police surgeons, supposedly because of a heart murmur, but he passed a medical retest after prominent blacks protested to city officials. He suffered the silent treatment from fellow officers at his West 68th Street station house. A threatening note with a racial epithet and a hole the width of a bullet was left on his bunk.

In an interview with the Columbia University Center for Oral History in 1960, six years before he died, Battle recalled that he never complained to outsiders about his treatment from co-workers. If a colleague had something against him, Battle challenged him to meet in the cellar and “take it out on my black behind.” Nobody did.

His comrades were won over in 1919 when Battle dashed into a crowd of rioters at 135th Street and Lenox Avenue to rescue a white officer. “The white officers worked in an all-Negro neighborhood, practically, and they needed me as much as I needed them and sometimes more,” Battle recalled.

In 2009, when the Harlem intersection was named in Battle’s honor, the police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, said the episode “was just one example among many of why Officer Battle was so respected and admired by his colleagues.”

“In fact, just a few days after this incident,” Mr. Kelly said, “they voted unanimously to admit him to a prep course for a sergeant’s exam.”

Early in his career, Battle was pointed out by tour guides as “New York’s first colored policeman.” Later, he was banished to Brooklyn, for raiding a politically connected establishment. He served as mentor to a young patrolman, William O’Dwyer, who would become mayor.

In 1935, Battle played a pivotal role in quelling a riot in Harlem, ignited by the arrest of a 16-year-old shoplifter whom store employees subdued and released through a back door. False rumors spread that the youth had been fatally beaten. By finding the boy, having him photographed and circulating his smiling image, Battle ended the riot.

alg samuel j battle jpg

In an earlier riot on the West Side, though, when white officers were beating black rioters, Battle “got even,” he said, by “whipping white heads.”

He also participated in the 1931 opening of a Harlem station house, where the tap dancer Bill Robinson promised a gift to the officer who made the first arrest. Battle shoved Robinson aside, he recalled, “and he said something to me, and I grabbed him and took him into the station house and had him booked.” After Robinson discovered that the arrest was a prank, he gave Battle a hat as a gift anyway.

In the Columbia interview, Battle recalled that in the 1940s “there were many cases of mistreatment of the populace by the police.” He blamed prejudice on parents. “All the old ones should be dead and put in the ocean!” said Battle. who was in his mid-70s. “Then we’d have a good world to live in.”

In 1936, celebrating his 25th anniversary on the force, he said that while he could not imagine the elimination of prejudice, it seemed to be declining as blacks improved educationally and financially.

“What we want is an equal opportunity to enjoy life and to make our own way,” he said. His advice: “Make your own opportunities. When you see them, take hold of them and never give up.”

1 black devider 800 8 72

 * -  First annual conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Church

African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME Church), black Methodist denomination originating in the United States, formally organized in 1816. It developed from a congregation formed by a group of blacks who withdrew in 1787 from St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia because of restrictions in seating; blacks had been confined to the gallery of the church. Those who withdrew formed the Free African Society, the forerunner of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, and built Bethel African Methodist Church in Philadelphia. In 1799 Richard Allen, a former Delaware slave, was ordained its minister by Bishop Francis Asbury of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1807 and again in 1815, Allen successfully sued in the Pennsylvania courts to establish Bethel’s independence from white Methodists. In 1816 Asbury consecrated Allen bishop of the newly organized AME Church, which accepted Methodist doctrine and discipline. The church speaks of Richard Allen, William Paul Quinn, David A. Payne, and Henry M. Turner as the “Four Horsemen” instrumental in the establishment of the church.

Prior to the American Civil War, the AME Church was largely limited to the free states of the Northeast and Midwest, and congregations were established in many of the major cities in those areas. However, the most significant period of growth occurred in the final months of the Civil War and in the subsequent Reconstruction. The title of a sermon by Theophilus G. Steward, “I Seek My Brethren,” became a call to evangelize newly freed slaves in the collapsing Confederacy, and congregations grew rapidly south of the Mason and Dixon Line. By 1880 AME membership had reached some 400,000. African Methodism then spread to Africa itself through the work of Bishop Henry Turner, who visited Liberia and Sierra Leone in 1891 and South Africa in 1896.

The AME Church has played a significant role in the higher education of African Americans in the United States. Several historically black colleges and universities, including Wilberforce University, are or were previously affiliated with the church, and there are three AME seminaries. Additionally, the African Methodist Episcopal University was established in Liberia in 1995.

The denomination elected its first female bishop, Vashti Murphy McKenzie, in 2000. In 2012 the AME Church entered into full communion with the United Methodist Church and several other predominantly African American churches, including the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. The AME Church is Methodist in church government, and it holds a general conference every four years. In 2018 the church claimed more than 2,500,000 members and 7,000 congregations across North America, the Caribbean, and sub-Saharan Africa and in Guyana in South America. Its headquarters are in Tennessee.

1 black devider 800 8 72

https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/battle-samuel-james-1883-1966/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_J._Battle

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/27/nyregion/recalling-samuel-battle-who-became-first-black-on-nypd.html

https://baltimorecitypolicehistory.com/samuel-battle-remembers 

Devider color with motto

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

WD ( Officer and Sergeant), SWD, CCT#1, 
Tac QRT, NWD, E&T.

Pin It

Wanted

Copies of: Baltimore Police Department class photos, pictures of officers, vehicles, equipment, newspaper articles relating to our department. Also wanted Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, Hot Sheets Reports, and or Brochures. Information on retired or deceased officers, fallen or injured officers and anything that may help us to preserve the history and proud traditions of this agency.
Fields marked with * are required
Upload file... Number of files left: 3

Files:

    User Login Form

    X

    Right Click

    No right click